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Thread: How close can one solid state object be to another solid state object?

  1. #1 How close can one solid state object be to another solid state object? 
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    Would a Photon of 6.261 * 10-34 joule seconds (according to Planck's constant) go through an Electron with a charge of 1.602 * 10-19 joules (according to electron volt) and generate a repulsive magnetic force with the distance of half a micrometre 10-7 lasting a Femto second 10-15 with an infrared cm 10-3 wavelength?

    In less technical terms, for example, how close is the cup to the cup mat it sits on? I think I read somewhere that the closest one solid thing can be to another is 1 micrometre 10-6 but I would like to know what the right answer is.

    I know for instance of the Exclusion Principle which states that nothing solid can touch because the Electrons of both repell each other and I know that magnetism works by light passing through magnets and carrying the additional magnetism temporarily. Also as for examples in nature I read that mylenated sheathes are a micrometre apart along the axon of neurons, and that the chloropest on the underside of leaves which harbour carbon dioxide temporarily, form a micrometre area of distance between them. Also I think I read somewhere that the capillaries of amphibians (who breathe dissolved O2 in water from their skin) are a micrometre apart from their skin.


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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_Isaac_10 View Post
    Would a Photon of 6.261 * 10-34 joule seconds (according to Planck's constant) go through an Electron with a charge of 1.602 * 10-19 joules (according to electron volt) and generate a repulsive magnetic force with the distance of half a micrometre 10-7 lasting a Femto second 10-15 with an infrared cm 10-3 wavelength?

    In less technical terms, for example, how close is the cup to the cup mat it sits on? I think I read somewhere that the closest one solid thing can be to another is 1 micrometre 10-6 but I would like to know what the right answer is.

    I know for instance of the Exclusion Principle which states that nothing solid can touch because the Electrons of both repell each other and I know that magnetism works by light passing through magnets and carrying the additional magnetism temporarily. Also as for examples in nature I read that mylenated sheathes are a micrometre apart along the axon of neurons, and that the chloropest on the underside of leaves which harbour carbon dioxide temporarily, form a micrometre area of distance between them. Also I think I read somewhere that the capillaries of amphibians (who breathe dissolved O2 in water from their skin) are a micrometre apart from their skin.
    Yes, well, the size of an atom is generally taken to be determined by the closest approach that other atoms can typically make to it. We express this by means of various measures of what is called the "atomic radius" of an element: Atomic radius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Atomic radii vary of course, but are often in the order of what we used to call an Angstrom or 10 ⁻⁰ metres, or so.


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    I pressed like on this comment but I don't think it's registering that. Thank you for this response, you have helped me a lot.
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    There is a malfunction with the Like button at present.
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