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Thread: no attraction

  1. #1 no attraction 
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
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    if a gas exhibited absolutely no attraction (which isn't possible, because it will always have at least London Dispersion forces, right?), would it be possible to turn it into a liquid or solid with a low enough temperature/high enough pressure?


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    Forum Senior anand_kapadia's Avatar
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    what does attraction mean here.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Sophomore Matt Lacey's Avatar
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    I imagine so, but the pressure you'd need would be enormous.
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Lacey
    I imagine so, but the pressure you'd need would be enormous.
    ok. and i'm guessing it'd evaporate or sublime the instant you released the pressure or raised the temp.?

    Quote Originally Posted by anand_kapadia
    what does attraction mean here.
    attraction between gas molecules, caused by London Dispersion forces. basically, at any one time, the electrons of an atom or molecule might be more highly concentrated on one side of it, making it more negative on that side, and more positive on the other side. This occurs in all the gas molecules, so their positive and negative ends will attract each other. This is the force by which nonpolar molecules stick together (for example, octane).
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  6. #5 Re: no attraction 
    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    if a gas exhibited absolutely no attraction (which isn't possible, because it will always have at least London Dispersion forces, right?), would it be possible to turn it into a liquid or solid with a low enough temperature/high enough pressure?
    Er, do you not know what bottled butane and propane is ?
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  7. #6 Re: no attraction 
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leohopkins
    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    if a gas exhibited absolutely no attraction (which isn't possible, because it will always have at least London Dispersion forces, right?), would it be possible to turn it into a liquid or solid with a low enough temperature/high enough pressure?
    Er, do you not know what bottled butane and propane is ?
    i would imagine it's butane and propane that's been placed in a bottle. What's your point exactly? They'd still exhibit attraction due to london dispersion forces...
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    Forum Professor leohopkins's Avatar
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    My point is that the butane / propane is LIQUID inside the bottle because it has been put under pressure.

    Ive never heard of "London dispersion forces" ? If they have go nothing to do with the public order act then what are they ?
    The hand of time rested on the half-hour mark, and all along that old front line of the English there came a whistling and a crying. The men of the first wave climbed up the parapets, in tumult, darkness, and the presence of death, and having done with all pleasant things, advanced across No Man's Land to begin the Battle of the Somme. - Poet John Masefield.

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  9. #8  
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    I think your missing the point of the question. The OP was asking whether you can liquify or solidify a hypothetical molecule which exibits no intermolecular forces.

    As chemboy said a molecule like this is not possible as non polar molecules still exibit London dispersion/Van der Waals forces. This intermolecular force is the reason why, like you said, butane / propane is found as liquid at standard pressure.

    Theres a good explanation here... http://www.chemguide.co.uk/atoms/bonding/vdw.html#top for how London Dispersion forces work
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