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Thread: Rydberg's Formula

  1. #1 Rydberg's Formula 
    Forum Junior AndresKiani's Avatar
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    So we have the Rydberg's Formula for 1 electron system such as Hydrogen or Helium Ion or any other one electron system.

    DeltaE = -2.18 x 1018(1/nfinal2 - 1/ninitial2)

    Though I came across, I new formula for the first time just now.

    DeltaE = (-Z2/n2)R ---> R = -2.18 x 1018 J or 3.39 x 1015 Hz

    So I'm guessing that the second equation can be used for both 1 electron and multi-electron systems? What is this formula called btw?


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  3. #2  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    So we have the Rydberg's Formula for 1 electron system such as Hydrogen or Helium Ion or any other one electron system.

    DeltaE = -2.18 x 1018(1/nfinal2 - 1/ninitial2)

    Though I came across, I new formula for the first time just now.

    DeltaE = (-Z2/n2)R ---> R = -2.18 x 1018 J or 3.39 x 1015 Hz

    So I'm guessing that the second equation can be used for both 1 electron and multi-electron systems? What is this formula called btw?
    I'm rusty on the details of all this, but I rather think your second formula is Rydberg's formula for hydrogen-like atoms (i.e. ions with only one electron left). Have a look here: Rydberg formula - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Once you have more than one electron present, you get electron-electron repulsions and so the relationship of energy to nuclear charge becomes impossible to calculate exactly.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Junior AndresKiani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    So we have the Rydberg's Formula for 1 electron system such as Hydrogen or Helium Ion or any other one electron system.

    DeltaE = -2.18 x 1018(1/nfinal2 - 1/ninitial2)

    Though I came across, I new formula for the first time just now.

    DeltaE = (-Z2/n2)R ---> R = -2.18 x 1018 J or 3.39 x 1015 Hz

    So I'm guessing that the second equation can be used for both 1 electron and multi-electron systems? What is this formula called btw?
    I'm rusty on the details of all this, but I rather think your second formula is Rydberg's formula for hydrogen-like atoms (i.e. ions with only one electron left). Have a look here: Rydberg formula - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Once you have more than one electron present, you get electron-electron repulsions and so the relationship of energy to nuclear charge becomes impossible to calculate exactly.
    Yeah.. I just saw this formula and I was thinking that Z would be replaced by any atomic number. But as you said, for multi e- systems we would have to calculate the full electromagnetic field and its interactions which is a pain.
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  5. #4  
    exchemist
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by exchemist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    So we have the Rydberg's Formula for 1 electron system such as Hydrogen or Helium Ion or any other one electron system.

    DeltaE = -2.18 x 1018(1/nfinal2 - 1/ninitial2)

    Though I came across, I new formula for the first time just now.

    DeltaE = (-Z2/n2)R ---> R = -2.18 x 1018 J or 3.39 x 1015 Hz

    So I'm guessing that the second equation can be used for both 1 electron and multi-electron systems? What is this formula called btw?
    I'm rusty on the details of all this, but I rather think your second formula is Rydberg's formula for hydrogen-like atoms (i.e. ions with only one electron left). Have a look here: Rydberg formula - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Once you have more than one electron present, you get electron-electron repulsions and so the relationship of energy to nuclear charge becomes impossible to calculate exactly.
    Yeah.. I just saw this formula and I was thinking that Z would be replaced by any atomic number. But as you said, for multi e- systems we would have to calculate the full electromagnetic field and its interactions which is a pain.
    Yes, especially since, to make matters even worse, s, p, d, f etc orbitals have different shapes and degrees of penetration of one another's envelopes. Hence the individuality of the chemical elements, of course…....
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  6. #5  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    But as you said, for multi e- systems we would have to calculate the full electromagnetic field and its interactions which is a pain.
    Awards prize for the understatement of the millennium
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AndresKiani View Post
    But as you said, for multi e- systems we would have to calculate the full electromagnetic field and its interactions which is a pain.
    Awards prize for the understatement of the millennium
    I certainly wouldn't know how the Hartree-Fock to go about it.
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  8. #7  
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    Your Gaussian is as good as mine...
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Your Gaussian is as good as mine...
    Touché! Very good.
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