Notices
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: covalent -> ionic

  1. #1 covalent -> ionic 
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    will an atom that is covalently bonded tend to form an ionic bond if presented with the opportunity so that it will 'own' an electron rather than share one? the one point against this that i've thought of is just that covalent and ionic bonds are apprx. of equal strength... Where i'm getting this, and why i'm wondering about it is...

    Na<sup>0</sup> + H2O ---> NaOH + H2


    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    墨子 DaBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,674
    I'm not sure I understand your question but I can assure you that (generally) ionic bonds are much stronger than covalant bonds. Correct me if I'm wrong.


    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    Quote Originally Posted by DaBOB
    I'm not sure I understand your question but I can assure you that (generally) ionic bonds are much stronger than covalant bonds. Correct me if I'm wrong.
    I suppose this could be incorrect, but at the bottom of the first paragraph of the "Ionic bond" article on wikipedia it says that ionic bonds are "similar in strength to covalent bonds."

    Given the equation i mentioned, I'm just basically asking why the O in water gives up an H to bond with the unionized sodium.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Sophomore Matt Lacey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Southampton, England
    Posts
    119
    There's an electrochemical driving force for this reaction:

    Na --> Na<sup>+</sup> + e<sup>-</sup>, E<sup>o</sup><sub>SHE</sub> = -2.70 V

    2H<sup>+</sup> + 2e<sup>-</sup> --> H<sub>2</sub>, E<sup>o</sup><sub>SHE</sub> = 0.00 V (by definition)

    Let me know if you need further explanation.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,838
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Lacey
    There's an electrochemical driving force for this reaction:

    Na --> Na<sup>+</sup> + e<sup>-</sup>, E<sup>o</sup><sub>SHE</sub> = -2.70 V

    2H<sup>+</sup> + 2e<sup>-</sup> --> H<sub>2</sub>, E<sup>o</sup><sub>SHE</sub> = 0.00 V (by definition)

    Let me know if you need further explanation.
    i do need further explaination... wish i had taken AP chem
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Sophomore Matt Lacey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Southampton, England
    Posts
    119
    It's basically to do with electrical potential energy. The oxidation of sodium and subsequent reduction of hydrogen releases energy which has a potential of 2.7 V, which makes this a favourable reaction.

    This page might give you some useful info on Electrochemistry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrochemistry
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •