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Thread: Removing breath vapor on cold days

  1. #1 Removing breath vapor on cold days 
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    Hi,
    excuse me if this is not the appropriate place for this question,
    I'm making a film, and I'm wondering is there a way to remove the vapor that occurs when actors exhale on a cold day? I've heard of people putting ice cubes in their mouths, but that's not really a fortunate solution for us since they will be doing it for ten days in a row.
    Thanks a lot!


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  3. #2  
    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    The mist/dropets (what you are calling "vapour" which it isn't ) is caused when water vapour (correct usage) moves from a warm area (inside your mouth/body) to a cold area (outside), the easiest way to stop the vapour condensing into liquid droplets (which is what you are meaning by the vapour I assume) is to raise the temperature or reduce the humidity of the outside air (or as in the ice cubes suggestion reduce the temperature in the mouth). If the ouside temperature is higher the liquid is less likely to condense into a mist, if the humidity is lower the droplets are less likely to form due to the low ambient partial pressure of water leading to an increased evaporation rate. So the spot light heaters you get in pub beer gardens just out of shot may be useful...


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  4. #3  
    precious sir ir r aj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    The mist/dropets (what you are calling "vapour" which it isn't ) is caused when water vapour (correct usage) moves from a warm area (inside your mouth/body) to a cold area (outside), the easiest way to stop the vapour condensing into liquid droplets (which is what you are meaning by the vapour I assume) is to raise the temperature or reduce the humidity of the outside air (or as in the ice cubes suggestion reduce the temperature in the mouth). If the ouside temperature is higher the liquid is less likely to condense into a mist, if the humidity is lower the droplets are less likely to form due to the low ambient partial pressure of water leading to an increased evaporation rate. So the spot light heaters you get in pub beer gardens just out of shot may be useful...
    well done.
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  5. #4  
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    Thanks a lot for your reply. We'll try raising the air temperature around the actors, if not they'll have to deal with the ice cubes
    Sorry for the incorrect terminology, English isn't my native language so mistakes happen.
    Thanks again, bye
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    Bullshit Intolerant PhDemon's Avatar
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    No problem, I hope it works out.
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