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Thread: evaporation and dating of a liquid

  1. #1 evaporation and dating of a liquid 
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    Hello :-)

    I hope I'm not interrupting. I have a few questions I need to find an answer for for a story I'm trying to write. If anyone could help, it would be greatly appreciated :-) If these questions and my suggestions seem really stupid, my apologies :-)

    I would like to know how long a liquid, let's say some sort of plant extract, could keep (i.e. not evaporate). If it were really well sealed in an airtight recipient, would it not evaporate like forever? Can it survive let's say ten thousand or more years? Would there be a way to make sure the chemical composition doesn't change and that e.g. if it were drinkable like thousands of years ago, it would still be drinkable now?

    Secondly, would there be any method to date this liquid (tell how old it is)?

    Thank you very much!
    tobias


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  3. #2  
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    If the container is a closed-system type, in which the environment cannot affect the water in the container, then there is a chance that it can survive for thousand of years. That also depends on what container you have. The container should not affect the water or be affected by the environment also. Gold is unreactive so it is ideal to use it. These are just suggestions.


    "Understanding is better than memorizing."
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  4. #3  
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    thank you very much!

    any clue as to the dating question?

    thx
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  5. #4  
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    If it's a plant extract then radiocarbon dating may be the answer, pure water for example does not 'age' other than some of the molecules being affected by UV light and converting to Hydrogen peroxide H2O2 if you measured the amount of this and knew how much sunlight etc you could make a guess but it would probably be next to useless as you could only reliably give a minimum age. Incidentally your sample and container etc would need to be sterile and probably best frozen to ensure stability, the flesh of mammoths has been found from time to time frozen from many thousands of years ago.
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  6. #5  
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    thx very much!
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