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Thread: Need to know the best single or combined substances that holds an Ice form the longest in room temp.

  1. #1 Need to know the best single or combined substances that holds an Ice form the longest in room temp. 
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    As the title says. But FYI it needs to be able to freeze in a normal home freezer. Which substance/s can holds an Ice form, or a temperature at or below freezing the longest when set in room temperature (say 90f). FYI, the substance/s needs to be human safe, as if it leaked on your skin, or accidentally swallowed you have nothing to worry about.

    Thank you, James Jr.



    Edit: Anyone? I know water isn't the best. Just need to know what will hold a freeze (32f or below) the longest in room temperature, but be human safe.


    Last edited by James.Jr; July 29th, 2013 at 02:45 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by James.Jr View Post
    As the title says. But FYI it needs to be able to freeze in a normal home freezer. Which substance/s can holds an Ice form, or a temperature at or below freezing the longest when set in room temperature (say 90f). FYI, the substance/s needs to be human safe, as if it leaked on your skin, or accidentally swallowed you have nothing to worry about.

    Thank you, James Jr.

    Edit: Anyone? I know water isn't the best. Just need to know what will hold a freeze (32f or below) the longest in room temperature, but be human safe.
    The best "substance" is what you had mused about in your other thread -- a vacuum. That's how scientists store liquid nitrogen and other ultra-cold substances for long periods of time. The good ol' Thermos(tm) bottle is a consumer-grade version of a Dewar flask. It's a double-walled container, with a vacuum separating the two walls. The vacuum minimizes convective heat transfer, and keeping connections between the two walls thin (and connecting them only at the narrowest portion -- the neck) minimizes conduction. Radiation continues to operate, but using shiny surfaces helps reduce its effectiveness. Depending on construction details, you can store liquid nitrogen for a week or more in a Dewar. Keeping water/ice cold would not be a challenge.


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    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Make a thermos out of aerogel. Good to go.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  5. #4  
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    If you are looking for a material that can freeze, but becomes a liquid very slowly (melts) when you put it in a room temperature environment, I'd say mercury, or something else with a melting point not far below room temp would be your best bet.
    Ideally, you'd multiply specific heat by the temperature change needed to get it to its melting point, then choose the one with the highest value, as it would have to absorb more heat in order to melt.
    I picked murcury because it has a fairly high melting point, not much below room temperature. I don't know its specific heat, though.
    Last edited by TheUnknowable; August 9th, 2013 at 08:41 AM.
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    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Except that mercury tends to be dangerous.
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    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    It all depends what you mean by "longest".
    Steel freezes at well above room temperature, therefore it's not going to melt no matter how long you leave it in the room.
    And unless someone hits you with it it's not that dangerous.
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  8. #7  
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    Now that I reread it, seems like he only wants things with freezing points at or below the frezzing point of water, so specific heat is going to be the most important thing here.
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