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  1. #1 molecules 
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    We say that in solid, the molecules are compact and the inter molecular distance increases successively for liquid and gas. Now, what I really wonder is that what exists between the inter molecular distance in gas? Is it vacuum or sth else?


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    Let's say the nitrogen gas is filled in a closed vessel. Then within the vessel, the gas is compressed to its liquid state. In that case, the molecules won't have that random motion. Now what about the remaining space of the vessel?


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    It begins to look a bit spammy... all of javedansari's posts contain a link to either tutorvista or tutorcircle (the same company) ...
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    Keen spotting. Seems he slipped past the usual blocks, eh?
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    KJW
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    Quote Originally Posted by prafulla View Post
    We say that in solid, the molecules are compact and the inter molecular distance increases successively for liquid and gas.
    That's not entirely correct. The volumes (for a given mass of a particular substance) of a solid and liquid are more-or-less the same. Most substances do expand on melting but a few, water being a notable example, contract on melting. For a gas, the volume depends largely on the temperature and pressure, whereas for solids and liquids, this dependency is much less. For a solid, the distance between molecules is determined by crystal packing geometry, whereas for a liquid, though the molecules are bound together, their arrangement is largely random (especially at larger scales). Gas molecule are essentially free of each other and will occupy whatever space is available to them.
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    KJW
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    Quote Originally Posted by prafulla View Post
    Let's say the nitrogen gas is filled in a closed vessel. Then within the vessel, the gas is compressed to its liquid state. In that case, the molecules won't have that random motion. Now what about the remaining space of the vessel?
    Not all gases can be liquefied by pressure alone. A gas can only be liquefied if the temperature is below the critical point, and for nitrogen, the critical point is well below room temperature.
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