Notices
Results 1 to 47 of 47
Like Tree4Likes
  • 1 Post By Neverfly
  • 1 Post By Neverfly
  • 1 Post By shlunka
  • 1 Post By RamenNoodles

Thread: Questions on scents and odors.

  1. #1 Questions on scents and odors. 
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    908
    Simple questions that i dont even understand.

    what causes odors/scents?
    why does water have no smell?
    why does honey(of high viscosity liquids) have a scent even though they have so high viscosity and surface tension?

    and now about ants..
    are they able to track the position of sweet foods if no scent is emitted?


    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    If thy right nipple offend thee, pluck it off! Goes for the other, too!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanawe123 View Post
    what causes odors/scents?
    Your sense of smell is triggered by small molecules of the substance reaching the sensory organs within your nose. This is interpreted by the brain as a specific pattern. While the smell of sulfur would have the same recognizable pattern among animals, it is rather likely that it's embedded in us on a genetic level. This is successful as brains that had different interpretations of smell would be at most risk of starvation, mating misses, etc since they couldn't get the smell right to find the food or the mate.
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanawe123 View Post
    why does water have no smell?
    It does have a scent.
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanawe123 View Post
    why does honey(of high viscosity liquids) have a scent even though they have so high viscosity and surface tension?
    Because small molecules still separate from the complex sugars and travel through Brownian motion to reach your nose.

    Quote Originally Posted by ryanawe123 View Post
    and now about ants..
    are they able to track the position of sweet foods if no scent is emitted?
    Ants do things a bit differently. Forward Observer ants scout the area for useful substances and as they walk, they leave a trail of chemical sent behind them. When they find a goodie, they follow their own sent back to the anthill and alert others (Complex behavior of chemicals and antenna brushing) about the goodie and which scented trail to follow.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,489
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanawe123 View Post
    what causes odors/scents?
    Vlatile chemicals that stimulate receptors in the olfactory organ.
    Olfaction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    why does water have no smell?
    Probably because water is everywhere, including our bodies and so it would be distracting to smell it continuously.

    why does honey(of high viscosity liquids) have a scent even though they have so high viscosity and surface tension?
    Because honey is a complex mixture of many things. Some are volatile.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    908
    but can a single ant know the position if no scent is emitted?
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    If thy right nipple offend thee, pluck it off! Goes for the other, too!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    908
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Probably because water is everywhere, including our bodies and so it would be distracting to smell it continuously.
    i wish to smell water!!!

    but.. does air have a smell? -_-
    no. im not trying to ask a stupid question..
    it intrigues me.
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    If thy right nipple offend thee, pluck it off! Goes for the other, too!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    908
    coming to think more of #3, its awkward to want to know the scent on things that we smell continually...
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    If thy right nipple offend thee, pluck it off! Goes for the other, too!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    908
    where?
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    If thy right nipple offend thee, pluck it off! Goes for the other, too!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Scunthorpe, UK
    Posts
    10,655
    RAWRRRR!
    Chomp.

    Chew, chew, chew.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Freshman missarane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    41
    According to wikipedia water has no smell. I don`t think it is because it`s everywhere and we can`t smell it, plenty of stuffs are everywhere including in our bodies and we can still smell it.
    I`d say it`s more it`s chemical composition that makes it unsmelly.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Key West, Florida, Earth
    Posts
    4,789
    I smell chlorine in my tap water at home. I also can smell ocean water and its refreshing aroma.
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Freshman missarane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    41
    I forgot to mention pure*** water...
    God I miss sumer and the beach right now.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Key West, Florida, Earth
    Posts
    4,789
    Remove please, duplicate post, thanks.
    Attached Images
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Key West, Florida, Earth
    Posts
    4,789
    Yes, the ocean is a great place to relax and unwind, I just returned from a 2 week stay in Montego Bay in Jamaica, and it was very relaxing there, I went before the Spring Breakers were there and had few other guests at the resort I stayed at. Even took a horseback ride into a cove right off the beach.

    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Freshman missarane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by missarane View Post
    plenty of stuffs are everywhere including in our bodies and we can still smell it.
    .
    Do you have any examples?

    Hidrochloric acid for example. It is in our bodies, in plenty of stuffs we use like: cleaning products, food additives etc.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Forum Freshman missarane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Hydrochloric acid is in your stomach, how would you expect to smell it, and trust me I work in a chemistry lab and you can smell HCl, it's not pleasant!

    Yep it is in your stomach, I pointed that it exists in our bodies LIKE WATER, and you can totally smell it outside.
    So the fact that it exists everywhere does not influence the fact that we can smell it or not. Just as some hydrocarbons do not have smell and sulf it`s added to them because they can be very harmful.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Freshman missarane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    41
    Yes,my point is that pure water has no smell but not because it is in our nose and we are used to it, it just does not have smell.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,561
    water vapor WOULD have a smell, if humans had developed/retained the specific olfactory receptors that responded to bonding with water molecules. without receptors that bond with the water, there is no olfactory response generated.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    601
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanawe123 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Probably because water is everywhere, including our bodies and so it would be distracting to smell it continuously.
    i wish to smell water!!!

    but.. does air have a smell? -_-
    no. im not trying to ask a stupid question..
    it intrigues me.
    have you ever traveled? you can distinctly tell a difference when traveling to other places. scents are very good at eliciting memories, and i often associate smells of the air with places i've been. the air here smells a lot different than the air at a beach, or air in haiti, etc. i would attribute your lack of sensing air (and water) to sensory adaptation.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #19  
    Forum Freshman missarane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by missarane View Post
    Yes,my point is that pure water has no smell but not because it is in our nose and we are used to it, it just does not have smell.
    Nope, but the old wasp(?) got there with the answer before me. Generally compounds of group six elements with hydrogen (H2S, H2Se) are vVERY smelly, water is the only one that isn't we have evolved not to be able to smell it....


    I really do not get your point...
    Are you telling me that water does not have smell because no chemo receptors? Yeah that is what I`m saying for like 4 posts now in an inverted way: it`s chemical structure makes it unsmelly to humans.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #20  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    I have no idea what you guys are going off on. I can smell water.
    I can smell it in the bottle from a spring, I can smell it in a creek, I can smell it in the jug.
    I can taste it, too. It has a flavor.
    Now, maybe I'm smelling the minerals IN the water. I don't know. But if you're going into that much detail- I'll remind you that it was Ryanawe that asked the question and simple answers would be better. Not saying Ryan is simple- but biting off more than he can chew won't help increase his understanding any.
    seagypsy likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #21  
    Forum Freshman missarane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    41
    Water is a liquid at standard temperature and pressure. It is tasteless and odorless. The intrinsic colour of water and ice is a very slight blue hue, although both appear colorless in small quantities. Water vapour is essentially invisible as a gas.
    via wiki
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #22  
    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3,107
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    I have no idea what you guys are going off on. I can smell water.
    I can smell it in the bottle from a spring, I can smell it in a creek, I can smell it in the jug.
    I can taste it, too. It has a flavor.
    Now, maybe I'm smelling the minerals IN the water. I don't know. But if you're going into that much detail- I'll remind you that it was Ryanawe that asked the question and simple answers would be better. Not saying Ryan is simple- but biting off more than he can chew won't help increase his understanding any.
    NF is also very put off by water. He hates it passionately. And only deals with it as much as he absolutely has to lol. When you hate something you become sensitive to its presence. He drinks what he must and showers daily but that's as much as he is willing to tolerate lol. He is none too happy about the rain right now. Its like being married to a cat.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #23  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,561
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    I have no idea what you guys are going off on. I can smell water.
    I can smell it in the bottle from a spring, I can smell it in a creek, I can smell it in the jug.
    I can taste it, too. It has a flavor.
    Now, maybe I'm smelling the minerals IN the water. I don't know. But if you're going into that much detail- I'll remind you that it was Ryanawe that asked the question and simple answers would be better. Not saying Ryan is simple- but biting off more than he can chew won't help increase his understanding any.
    you are smelling the impurities in the water most likely, and not the water itself, which we do not have olfactory receptors that react to it.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #24  
    Forum Professor scoobydoo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,240
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    you are smelling the impurities in the water most likely, and not the water itself, which we do not have olfactory receptors that react to it.
    What about smelling (or sensing) moisture in the air, such as humidity or a nearby source of water? How does that work?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  26. #25  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    Might that not be true for many things?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  27. #26  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,561
    Quite possibly
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  28. #27  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    Then I smell water, damnit!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  29. #28  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,561
    Maybe you have a few receptors which react to water, the much simpler and more biologically/chemically feesable awnser is you smell the impurities in the water. lol
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  30. #29  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Scunthorpe, UK
    Posts
    10,655
    Yeah. I was about to come in heavily on NF's side because I can usually smell "water in the air" before it rains.
    But a quick Google saved me some embarassment and it turns out, in fact, that impending rain affects soil moisture levels (now THAT strikes me as weird) and it's that mositure - plus the impurities it brings UP from the ground - that is smelt.
    Not sure about an explanation for me smelling snow on its way though...
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  31. #30  
    Forum Professor scoobydoo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,240
    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    ... it turns out, in fact, that impending rain affects soil moisture levels (now THAT strikes me as weird) and it's that mositure - plus the impurities it brings UP from the ground - that is smelt.
    Does that mean we aren't able to smell an incoming rain on the open sea no where near a land mass? If Paleoichneum is correct about us not possessing olfactory receptors to detect water, perhaps it is the contrasting and/or absence of the ambient smell/odor in prelude to rain. Any thoughts?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  32. #31  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    I think so, really. I said in the post above that maybe I am smelling minerals in the water.

    But in the end, I do think a lot of scents are a combination of molecules. That we associate scents with some things but the cause of the scent on a molecular level is something we wouldn't expect.

    Water, as an evaporate that moves in the air and as a solvent, is present in most things. I would speculate that it acts as a carrier.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  33. #32  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,561
    Yes, water is most assuredly a carrier molecule that will facilitate the transport of other molecules to the olfactory receptors. At see you will get a change in the air composition as the storm moves closer, as will happen with impending snow. In each case the atmospheric pressure will rise/fall and this will result in an increase or decrease in total particulate/vapor levels of the air. As such you will "smell" the incoming weather as a change in the air composition.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  34. #33  
    Forum Professor scoobydoo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,240
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    In each case the atmospheric pressure will rise/fall and this will result in an increase or decrease in total particulate/vapor levels of the air. As such you will "smell" the incoming weather as a change in the air composition.
    So it's the differences in air composition and increase/decrease in particulates it may be carrying that our noses are detecting and not the presence of water/moisture per se. Did I get this right?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  35. #34  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,561
    The pressure changes the total water carrying capacity of the atmosphere, which results in an increase or decrease in water molecules in the air
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  36. #35  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    Ok, so how come I can smell nonsense on the forum?
    Dywyddyr likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  37. #36  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Scunthorpe, UK
    Posts
    10,655
    ^ What he said!
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  38. #37  
    Malignant Pimple shlunka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dogbox in front of Dywyddyr's house.
    Posts
    1,784
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    I've visited farms, bullshit is quite odouriferous...
    But it's so fun to play in.
    RamenNoodles likes this.
    "MODERATOR NOTE : We don't entertain trolls here, not even in the trash can. Banned." -Markus Hanke
    Reply With Quote  
     

  39. #38  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    908
    1) Does a substance, being tasteless, mean it is odorless?
    2) Does a substance, being odorless (and does emit airborne particles), mean it is tasteless?

    3) are there substances that have a taste, but no smell (and does emit airborne particles)?
    4) are there substances that have a smell, but no taste?
    Last edited by RamenNoodles; April 10th, 2013 at 08:13 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    If thy right nipple offend thee, pluck it off! Goes for the other, too!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  40. #39  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Key West, Florida, Earth
    Posts
    4,789
    Does a substance, being tasteless, mean it is odorless?
    Does a substance, being odorless (and does emit airborne particles), mean it is tasteless?

    are there substances that have a taste, but no smell (and does emit airborne particles)?
    are there substances that have a smell, but no taste?


    What do you think, answer it first yourself then I will respond to what you say.
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
    Reply With Quote  
     

  41. #40  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    908
    1) i dont know
    2) i think its possible
    3) maybe some foods? i cant think of any specifically.
    4) i don't know any.
    Neverfly likes this.
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    If thy right nipple offend thee, pluck it off! Goes for the other, too!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  42. #41  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Key West, Florida, Earth
    Posts
    4,789
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanawe123 View Post
    1) i dont know
    2) i think its possible
    3) maybe some foods? i cant think of any specifically.
    4) i don't know any.
    So you don't research what you do not understand before asking questions?

    You should start trying to look up answers that you'd like to understand about yourself first before asking others to do your research for you. Google, Bing and Dogpile are all fine sources that everyone uses to find things out and then if you can't find out something you should come here and ask but please try to learn something on your own.
    When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.
    Jimi Hendrix
    Reply With Quote  
     

  43. #42  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,489
    We can sense some basic tastes with the tongue (sweet, salty, sour, etc) but everything else (rosemary, violets, bacon) depends on our sense of smell.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
    Reply With Quote  
     

  44. #43  
    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    601
    without our sense of smell, eating wouldn't be so wonderful!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  45. #44  
    has lost interest seagypsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    3,107
    Quote Originally Posted by mat5592 View Post
    without our sense of smell, eating wouldn't be so wonderful!
    losing sense of touch also destroys the pleasure of eating. textures of food definitely make a difference in whether your like something or not.
    Speaking badly about people after they are gone and jumping on the bash the band wagon must do very well for a low self-esteem.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  46. #45  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    908
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    So you don't research what you do not understand before asking questions?
    what keywords do you expect me to type in google???

    if i type in the words "tasteless" and "odorless" tasteless odorless - Google Searchthe only results i get are chemicals that are tasteless and odorless.

    i dont even know whats the opposite of tasteless. tasting? tasteful? tastable?
    then opposite of odorless... odoring? odorful? odorable?

    please understand why i dont google for things i ask here..
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    If thy right nipple offend thee, pluck it off! Goes for the other, too!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  47. #46  
    Forum Masters Degree mat5592's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    601
    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by mat5592 View Post
    without our sense of smell, eating wouldn't be so wonderful!
    losing sense of touch also destroys the pleasure of eating. textures of food definitely make a difference in whether your like something or not.
    true. it seems a lot of our senses go into our (or mine at least) love of food.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  48. #47  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Totnes in Devon, Mumbai and StAlban-Auriolles in Southern France
    Posts
    120
    The reason why we do not smell pure water is because there is a high concentration of water molecules in the nose and smell receptors are very easily poisoned by continuous exposure to those molecules. I used to work in a printing ink plant and never noticed any smell after a while, however, visitors always commented on the strong smell of petroleum solvents.
    The smell of rain is called Petrichor and yes, is a smell of volatiles released from dry soil when wetted by rain, not the water itself.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 15th, 2012, 04:27 PM
  2. A Few Questions...
    By marcut in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: November 9th, 2008, 05:19 PM
  3. some questions
    By anand_kapadia in forum Chemistry
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: March 1st, 2007, 02:58 AM
  4. 2 questions...
    By shawngoldw in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: November 15th, 2006, 05:54 AM
  5. Chemistry defeats the "Godzilla of odors"
    By antares in forum Chemistry
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 25th, 2006, 07:56 PM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •