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Thread: Testing my chemistry!

  1. #1 Testing my chemistry! 
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    Hello to my fellow forum members, of late I have not looked at chemistry, so off the top of my head, will see if what I remember is correct, without looking it up.
    Below are several statements, could you please correct me if my memory serves me wrong.


    1. Chemistry is the study of Atoms and their reactions, but is focused only on the electron and not the nucleus of the an Atom.

    2. You can only have 7 electron layers

    3. The layer of the electron shell closest to the nucleus of an atom is called the 1s layer.

    4. The second layer is called 2s

    5. The 3rd layer then becomes the P layers.

    6. The 3rd layer is the Pi-bonding layers

    7. Electron layers can contain no more than 8 Electrons

    8. Mostly chemical reactions involve H.

    9. Chemical bonding can have different shapes such as the chair and boat formation.

    10. If I put salt in water, the salt is salute.

    11. h20 is 2 hydrogen and 1 oxygen

    12. Co2 is one carbon and 2 oxygen

    13. Gases have different densities and different buoyoncy

    14. He , is the most buoyant gas

    15. H + H makes He

    16. Energy is needed for the bonding process

    I thank you in advance for corrections.


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    Malignant Pimple shlunka's Avatar
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    Your first sentence is a comma splice.


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    More chain yanking.
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

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    Statement 15 it wrong correct it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natassha View Post
    Statement 15 it wrong correct it.
    You will get used to that from Theorist... Although in this case, he may have meant if nuclear fused, rather than chemically bonded. (Which wouldn't be testing his Chemistry...)
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    numbers 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10(solute not salute),13,14,15,16, maybe more but i think the others are okay
    Last edited by fiveworlds; March 16th, 2013 at 01:50 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    1. Chemistry is the study of Atoms and their reactions, but is focused only on the electron and not the nucleus of the an Atom.
    OK

    2. You can only have 7 electron layers
    3. The layer of the electron shell closest to the nucleus of an atom is called the 1s layer.
    4. The second layer is called 2s
    5. The 3rd layer then becomes the P layers.
    6. The 3rd layer is the Pi-bonding layers
    7. Electron layers can contain no more than 8 Electrons
    9. Chemical bonding can have different shapes such as the chair and boat formation.
    Grossly simplified and not completely accurate. But physical chemistry is complicated and, for your needs, irrelevant. So I am not going to say more.

    8. Mostly chemical reactions involve H.
    No. only reactions involving hydrogen involve hydrogen.

    10. If I put salt in water, the salt is salute.
    Yes ... anything dissolved (in anything) is a solute. The thing it is dissolved in is the the "solvent". (Not really chemistry, but ... meh)

    11. h20 is 2 hydrogen and 1 oxygen
    Close: H2O is 2 hydrogen and 1 oxygen (i.e. water),

    12. Co2 is one carbon and 2 oxygen
    Close: CO2 is one carbon and 2 oxygen (i.e. carbon dioxide)

    13. Gases have different densities and different buoyoncy
    14. He , is the most buoyant gas
    OK. (Physics, not chemistry but whatever)

    15. H + H makes He
    Only in nuclear fusion, not chemistry. In chemistry, H + H = H2

    16. Energy is needed for the bonding process
    Yes... I suppose.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    16 no strange some reactions are exothermic etc
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    HydrogenH2) = 0.090 kg/m3
    HeliumHe) = 0.178 kg/m3
    Thus helium is almost twice as dense as hydrogen. However, buoyancy depends upon the difference of the densities (ρgas) - (ρair) rather than upon their ratios. Thus the difference in buoyancies is about 8%, as seen from the buoyancy equation

    Lifting gas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    the density of a gas is also dependent on the amount of pressure acting on it so the density of hydrogen under one pressure could equal the density of helium under a diff pressure
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    Thank you all for the corrections. I am sorry for mixing in Physics . Looking at number 15 on my list, H + H = H2, I stand corrected. I was looking at it from a fusion point of view.

    Is it right to say that chemistry only joins electrons in a bonded state and physics changes it into something else by multiplying the nucleus?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natassha View Post
    Statement 15 it wrong correct it.
    Thank you, I did mix up my Chemistry with Physics with the statement.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    16 no strange some reactions are exothermic etc
    Thank you could you please explain in a simple way exothermic or just an example of exothermic?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    1. Chemistry is the study of Atoms and their reactions, but is focused only on the electron and not the nucleus of the an Atom.
    OK

    2. You can only have 7 electron layers
    3. The layer of the electron shell closest to the nucleus of an atom is called the 1s layer.
    4. The second layer is called 2s
    5. The 3rd layer then becomes the P layers.
    6. The 3rd layer is the Pi-bonding layers
    7. Electron layers can contain no more than 8 Electrons
    9. Chemical bonding can have different shapes such as the chair and boat formation.
    Grossly simplified and not completely accurate. But physical chemistry is complicated and, for your needs, irrelevant. So I am not going to say more.

    8. Mostly chemical reactions involve H.
    No. only reactions involving hydrogen involve hydrogen.

    10. If I put salt in water, the salt is salute.
    Yes ... anything dissolved (in anything) is a solute. The thing it is dissolved in is the the "solvent". (Not really chemistry, but ... meh)

    11. h20 is 2 hydrogen and 1 oxygen
    Close: H2O is 2 hydrogen and 1 oxygen (i.e. water),

    12. Co2 is one carbon and 2 oxygen
    Close: CO2 is one carbon and 2 oxygen (i.e. carbon dioxide)

    13. Gases have different densities and different buoyoncy
    14. He , is the most buoyant gas
    OK. (Physics, not chemistry but whatever)

    15. H + H makes He
    Only in nuclear fusion, not chemistry. In chemistry, H + H = H2

    16. Energy is needed for the bonding process
    Yes... I suppose.

    Thank you Strange for your post, and yes in deed a simpified view, but can you imagine if I tried to explain any complicated view lol.

    Thank you for the correction of solute. And explaining that the liquid I use to disolve in, is the solvent.

    Would my water and salt then be called a solution?

    And why would this not be chemistry?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    HydrogenH2) = 0.090 kg/m3
    HeliumHe) = 0.178 kg/m3
    Thus helium is almost twice as dense as hydrogen. However, buoyancy depends upon the difference of the densities (ρgas) - (ρair) rather than upon their ratios. Thus the difference in buoyancies is about 8%, as seen from the buoyancy equation

    Lifting gas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Thank you for the link, I have added it to my many bookmarks for reference and to try to understand and learn.
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    Moderator Comment:
    @ Theorist. Now that you have demonstrated that you can make a post that is almost completely correct I expect this standard to be maintained. Future sloppy posts of the type you have become known for will be interpreted as lazy and thus showing disrespect for the members.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Thank you all for the corrections. I am sorry for mixing in Physics . Looking at number 15 on my list, H + H = H2, I stand corrected. I was looking at it from a fusion point of view.

    Is it right to say that chemistry only joins electrons in a bonded state and physics changes it into something else by multiplying the nucleus?
    That's not even right, either. Your #15 was H+H=He, and that's not true because the most abundant form of hydrogen has a nucleus consisting of a proton and no neutrons. A helium nucleus has 2 protons and 2 neutrons.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    16 no strange some reactions are exothermic etc
    Thank you could you please explain in a simple way exothermic or just an example of exothermic?
    A hot pack. You break it, a chemical rxn takes place, heat is produced.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    16 no strange some reactions are exothermic etc
    Thank you could you please explain in a simple way exothermic or just an example of exothermic?
    A hot pack. You break it, a chemical rxn takes place, heat is produced.
    The glow stick?
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Moderator Comment:
    @ Theorist. Now that you have demonstrated that you can make a post that is almost completely correct I expect this standard to be maintained. Future sloppy posts of the type you have become known for will be interpreted as lazy and thus showing disrespect for the members.
    Thank you John, and point taken on the rather lazy posts.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Thank you all for the corrections. I am sorry for mixing in Physics . Looking at number 15 on my list, H + H = H2, I stand corrected. I was looking at it from a fusion point of view.

    Is it right to say that chemistry only joins electrons in a bonded state and physics changes it into something else by multiplying the nucleus?
    That's not even right, either. Your #15 was H+H=He, and that's not true because the most abundant form of hydrogen has a nucleus consisting of a proton and no neutrons. A helium nucleus has 2 protons and 2 neutrons.

    Could you please elaborate more, I do not understand what you mean?
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Is it right to say that chemistry only joins electrons in a bonded state
    and physics changes it into something else by multiplying the nucleus?
    Physics covers many subjects. In this context, nuclear physics deals with changes to the nucleus.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Thank you could you please explain in a simple way exothermic or just an example of exothermic?
    An exothermic reaction is one where energy is released during the reaction. Fire is an obvious examples. Some reactions absorb energy when they take place; they are called "endothermic".

    In all cases there is "energy in the bonds" but the amount of energy before and after varies. Again, this is physical chemistry and you would need to study full time for several months to begin to understand it. (And then only if you had all the necessary background in physics and chemistry. Which you don't.)
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    16 no strange some reactions are exothermic etc
    Thank you could you please explain in a simple way exothermic or just an example of exothermic?
    A hot pack. You break it, a chemical rxn takes place, heat is produced.
    The glow stick?
    Yes, that as well.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Could you please elaborate more, I do not understand what you mean?
    (Normal) hydrogen is 1 proton + 1 electron. Helium is 2 protons + 2 neutrons + 2 electrons.

    Therefore, to fuse hydrogen to helium you need to find the extra neutrons. One option is to fuse an isotope of hydrogen that has 1 proton + 1 neutron + 1 electron. This isotope is called deuterium.

    I'm not sure if you can directly fuse two deuterium atoms to produce a helium atom (fusion reactions are not something I have ever studied).
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fiveworlds View Post
    16 no strange some reactions are exothermic etc
    Thank you could you please explain in a simple way exothermic or just an example of exothermic?
    A hot pack. You break it, a chemical rxn takes place, heat is produced.
    The glow stick?
    Yes. It releases energy as light instead of heat.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Thank you could you please explain in a simple way exothermic or just an example of exothermic?
    An exothermic reaction is one where energy is released during the reaction. Fire is an obvious examples. Some reactions absorb energy when they take place; they are called "endothermic".

    In all cases there is "energy in the bonds" but the amount of energy before and after varies. Again, this is physical chemistry and you would need to study full time for several months to begin to understand it. (And then only if you had all the necessary background in physics and chemistry. Which you don't.)
    Thank you Strange I understand what you mean by exothermic. Is it right to say exothermic is the opposite of chemical bonding?

    Meaning for example Benzine, to make the reaction we add energy, where as a glow stick chemical reaction makes the energy?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Could you please elaborate more, I do not understand what you mean?
    (Normal) hydrogen is 1 proton + 1 electron. Helium is 2 protons + 2 neutrons + 2 electrons.

    Therefore, to fuse hydrogen to helium you need to find the extra neutrons. One option is to fuse an isotope of hydrogen that has 1 proton + 1 neutron + 1 electron. This isotope is called deuterium.

    I am a little bit confused, I thought in the periodic table, that adding atomic numbers together give you the element.

    So H been atomic number 1, added together gives you atomic number 2, which is He? is this not always the case then?

    I'm not sure if you can directly fuse two deuterium atoms to produce a helium atom (fusion reactions are not something I have ever studied).

    I am a little bit confused, I thought in the periodic table, that adding atomic numbers together give you the element.

    So H been atomic number 1, added together gives you atomic number 2, which is He? is this not always the case then?
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Thank you Strange I understand what you mean by exothermic. Is it right to say exothermic is the opposite of chemical bonding?
    No. Exothermic is the opposite of endothermic.

    Meaning for example Benzine, to make the reaction we add energy
    What reaction? I would be pretty sure that some reactions involving benzene will be exothermic and others will be endothermic.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I am a little bit confused, I thought in the periodic table, that adding atomic numbers together give you the element.

    So H been atomic number 1, added together gives you atomic number 2, which is He? is this not always the case then?
    The atomic number is the number of protons. Most atoms also have some neutrons (typically a similar number to the number of protons). Some elements can have different forms (isotopes) with different numbers of neutrons (but the same number of protons, because it is the same element).
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post

    Thank you Strange I understand what you mean by exothermic. Is it right to say exothermic is the opposite of chemical bonding?
    No.

    In order to beak bonds, we have to put energy in. Creating bonds releases energy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I am a little bit confused, I thought in the periodic table, that adding atomic numbers together give you the element.

    So H been atomic number 1, added together gives you atomic number 2, which is He? is this not always the case then?
    The atomic number is the number of protons. Most atoms also have some neutrons (typically a similar number to the number of protons). Some elements can have different forms (isotopes) with different numbers of neutrons (but the same number of protons, because it is the same element).
    Thank you strange, I do know this from previous posts, I apologize again, I can see that my simplified views are a little bit too simple, in fact I am missing the bits out that make the sense in my explanations.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post

    Thank you Strange I understand what you mean by exothermic. Is it right to say exothermic is the opposite of chemical bonding?
    No.

    In order to beak bonds, we have to put energy in. Creating bonds releases energy.
    Thankyou flick that is how I sore it, but again explaind it terrible. Is that still not an opposite ?, one we put energy in, the other enegy is released, such as light from the glow stick.
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    [QUOTE=Strange;403408]
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Thank you Strange I understand what you mean by exothermic. Is it right to say exothermic is the opposite of chemical bonding?
    No. Exothermic is the opposite of endothermic.

    Meaning for example Benzine, to make the reaction we add energy[/QUOT

    What reaction? I would be pretty sure that some reactions involving benzene will be exothermic and others will be endothermic.
    Reworded - to make benzine we add energy/heat to carbon and H,
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    Exothermic and endothermic are opposite, but I would not mixed terminology. Breaking bonds is not the opposite of anything except forming bonds.
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    The thing is, there is never just breaking bonds or creating bonds. A chemical reactions means that some bonds are broken, atoms move around and other bonds are made.

    Overall, there might be more energy released by creating bonds then is used breaking them: an exothermic reaction. Or, there might be more energy used breaking bonds that is released by creating them: an endothermic reaction.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Exothermic and endothermic are opposite, but I would not mixed terminology. Breaking bonds is not the opposite of anything except forming bonds.
    Is endothermic the process where we add energy, and exophermic the process it creates its own energy?

    -added- it is the other way around
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Reworded - to make benzine we add energy/heat to carbon and H,
    Not really. I doubt you could make benzene that way.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Exothermic and endothermic are opposite, but I would not mixed terminology. Breaking bonds is not the opposite of anything except forming bonds.
    Is endothermic the process where we add energy, and exophermic the process it creates its own energy?

    -added- it is the other way around
    Endothermic rxns are where energy is added (on the reactant side) and exothermic is where energy is released (as a product). Energy is not created in these rxns, it is released. Energy is stored as potential energy in bonds.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Exothermic and endothermic are opposite, but I would not mixed terminology. Breaking bonds is not the opposite of anything except forming bonds.
    Is endothermic the process where we add energy, and exophermic the process it creates its own energy?

    -added- it is the other way around
    Endothermic rxns are where energy is added (on the reactant side) and exothermic is where energy is released (as a product). Energy is not created in these rxns, it is released. Energy is stored as potential energy in bonds.
    Thank you Flick, I think I am understanding it correctly.

    We add energy, Endothermic, to, two elements, this creates a reaction, the energy is then stored for future use.

    Where as exothermic, needs no energy added, two chemicals react to each other, and this does not store the energy, but releases the energy.

    Is that a clear understanding?, if not back to the drawing board.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I am a little bit confused, I thought in the periodic table, that adding atomic numbers together give you the element.

    So H been atomic number 1, added together gives you atomic number 2, which is He? is this not always the case then?
    This explains how hydrogen fuses into helium.
    Proton

    If you combine two hydrogen nuclei, you get a very unstable form of helium called a diproton. It consists of two protons, and usually it immediately dissociates back to two separate protons. However, it can undergo a beta-plus decay which changes one of the protons to a neutron and produces deuterium. Then the deuterium can fuse with a normal hydrogen nucleus to make helium.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I am a little bit confused, I thought in the periodic table, that adding atomic numbers together give you the element.

    So H been atomic number 1, added together gives you atomic number 2, which is He? is this not always the case then?
    This explains how hydrogen fuses into helium.
    Proton

    If you combine two hydrogen nuclei, you get a very unstable form of helium called a diproton. It consists of two protons, and usually it immediately dissociates back to two separate protons. However, it can undergo a beta-plus decay which changes one of the protons to a neutron and produces deuterium. Then the deuterium can fuse with a normal hydrogen nucleus to make helium.
    Thank you for the link, I can see my mistake, that I missed out the deuterium stage of process, my apologies.

    Is H2, deuterium?
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  44. #43  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Is H2, deuterium?
    H2 is a hydrogen molecule consisting of two hydrogen atoms (this is the normal form in which hydrogen exists).

    2H is hydrogen with an atomic weight of 2, in other words, deuterium.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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  45. #44  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Strange omitted to point out that difference is the addition of a neutron to the nucleus.
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