Notices
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: what is a stable ion??

  1. #1 what is a stable ion?? 
    New Member Mikita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4
    I don't get it. I've read about what it does and how it is formed but I don't know what it means and what it does...


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Isotope Zelos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,755
    a ion that is stable enough to exist
    logicly


    I am zelos. Destroyer of planets, exterminator of life, conquerer of worlds. I have come to rule this uiniverse. And there is nothing u pathetic biengs can do to stop me

    On the eighth day Zelos said: 'Let there be darkness,' and the light was never again seen.

    The king of posting
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: what is a stable ion?? 
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,169
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikita
    I don't get it. I've read about what it does and how it is formed but I don't know what it means and what it does...
    I don't know what you have read about it. Why don't you summarise that here so that we know where to begin with our explanation.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4 stable ion? 
    New Member Mikita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    4
    It says in my textbook that stable ions are like, ionic compounds or something that either gain or lose an electron to become "stable". But what does stable itself mean in this scenario?? For instance, you can't just randomly take electrons from an atom and then call it stable regardless of the number you took or what the atom is now equivalent to... like, I can't just take 1 electron from Beryllium and expect it to be stable to lithium, can I? And then take 2 electrons from that to make it stable to hydrogen, can I? And my textbook asks a question about drawing Bohr diagrams for the stable versions of Boron, Chlorine, Nitrogen and Beryllium. I know what and how to draw Bohr diagrams...but what the heck does stable mean here?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Isotope Zelos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,755
    It says in my textbook that stable ions are like, ionic compounds or something that either gain or lose an electron to become "stable". But what does stable itself mean in this scenario??
    oh that, it means they have a complete octet, 8 electrons in their outer shell

    most elements are looking for this octet and archive this either by becoming ions or make covalent bonds

    hydrogen/helium are the only atoms that dont get octet, they need to have 2 electrons only
    I am zelos. Destroyer of planets, exterminator of life, conquerer of worlds. I have come to rule this uiniverse. And there is nothing u pathetic biengs can do to stop me

    On the eighth day Zelos said: 'Let there be darkness,' and the light was never again seen.

    The king of posting
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman César's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Spain, Europe
    Posts
    61
    hydrogen/helium are the only atoms that dont get octet, they need to have 2 electrons only
    According to this, Li, Be, B, C and N make octets? Would you mind explaining how?

    Li 1s2,2s1
    Be 1s2,2s2
    B 1s2,2s2p1
    C 1s2,2s2p2
    N 1s2,2s2p3

    Best regards,

    César
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Isotope Zelos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,755
    i didnt say they make a octet, i said they want to make a octet. except hydrogen/helium that makes 2 electrons isntant, those close to them can become stable ions on 2 electronsLike N<sub><2/sub> makes a octet by sharing 3 of their electrons with the other one
    I am zelos. Destroyer of planets, exterminator of life, conquerer of worlds. I have come to rule this uiniverse. And there is nothing u pathetic biengs can do to stop me

    On the eighth day Zelos said: 'Let there be darkness,' and the light was never again seen.

    The king of posting
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    墨子 DaBOB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,674
    Yes it has to do with making octets.

    Stable is the opposite of reactive. A stable molecule is less likely to interact with (or destroy) other molecules.
    Do not try and bend the spoon. That's impossible. Instead... only realize the truth. There is no spoon. Then you'll see that it is not the spoon that bends, it is only yourself. -Spoon Boy
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Isotope Zelos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,755
    exacly
    I am zelos. Destroyer of planets, exterminator of life, conquerer of worlds. I have come to rule this uiniverse. And there is nothing u pathetic biengs can do to stop me

    On the eighth day Zelos said: 'Let there be darkness,' and the light was never again seen.

    The king of posting
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Freshman César's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Spain, Europe
    Posts
    61
    Zelos,

    what I tried to show with my question is that not only hydrogen and helium do not form octets to be stable (octet meaning a group of eight). It is only from some compounds of N onwards when a tendency for the octet appears. In Li the first impulse is to let the electron in 2p1 go to achieve 1s22s2 which is the electronic structure of helium. As a matter of fact it can be said that a ion is more estable the more its electronic structure resembles that of the closest noble gas.

    Best regards,

    César
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Isotope Zelos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,755
    yes ceasar it is to archive nobel gas form, thats mostly 8 electrons in the outer shell except those close to helium that wants 2, lithium for exemple drops a electron to get helium structure
    I am zelos. Destroyer of planets, exterminator of life, conquerer of worlds. I have come to rule this uiniverse. And there is nothing u pathetic biengs can do to stop me

    On the eighth day Zelos said: 'Let there be darkness,' and the light was never again seen.

    The king of posting
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12 Stability of Neucleus 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikita View Post
    It says in my textbook that stable ions are like, ionic compounds or something that either gain or lose an electron to become "stable". But what does stable itself mean in this scenario?? For instance, you can't just randomly take electrons from an atom and then call it stable regardless of the number you took or what the atom is now equivalent to... like, I can't just take 1 electron from Beryllium and expect it to be stable to lithium, can I? And then take 2 electrons from that to make it stable to hydrogen, can I? And my textbook asks a question about drawing Bohr diagrams for the stable versions of Boron, Chlorine, Nitrogen and Beryllium. I know what and how to draw Bohr diagrams...but what the heck does stable mean here?

    It depend on proton and neutron ratio of it. there are certain ratios make them stable since the balancing of electrostatic and other forces. study here too

    http://chemed.chem.wisc.edu/chempaths/GenChem-Textbook/Nuclear-Stability-748.html

    T
    hank you
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,438
    6 year old thread. Safe to say he probably figured it out by now.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    I'm 10 years old.
    Posts
    270
    one that grows in a stable ^__^
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Planet X
    Posts
    34
    An ion becomes negative if it gains an electron and becomes positive when you lose one. It becomes stable when you have the same amount of electrons and protons, creating a neutral charge. These electron changes can occur through covalent and ionic bonds between two or more elements. Does this help?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Scunthorpe, UK
    Posts
    10,655
    Quote Originally Posted by TheNewEinstein View Post
    It becomes stable when you have the same amount of electrons and protons, creating a neutral charge.
    Thus becoming not an ion.
    By definition.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •