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Thread: Glow in the dark..

  1. #1 Glow in the dark.. 
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    I am not sure of the technical term, but I would like to ask some questions about glow in the dark, and elements that glow in the dark.


    For example a glow stick, what reaction is caused when the tube is cracked and then shook?

    A watch face that glows in the dark, the glow and the material that glows, is that an element?

    If I was to take a piece of Platinum barium cyanide paper outside at night, would that glow?

    Forgive me if the Paper is incorrect, the guys voice on the video was muffled and I could just about make out Platinum barium cyanide paper, if that is what he said.

    Chemical reactions , what chemicals mix to glow in the dark?


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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I am not sure of the technical term, but I would like to ask some questions about glow in the dark, and elements that glow in the dark.
    Phosphorescence.


    For example a glow stick, what reaction is caused when the tube is cracked and then shook? Anyone?

    A watch face that glows in the dark, the glow and the material that glows, is that an element? Numerals were for many years painted with a radium compound (sulfide?) which glowed in the dark, somewhat dangerous, especially to the workers who used the stuff daily in painting the watch faces. Later TRITIUM gas was used to fill the watch crystal, as it glows in the dark. This, too, I believe, was outlawed.

    If I was to take a piece of Platinum barium cyanide paper outside at night, would that glow? Definitely NOT! Barium Platino-Cyanide was (is) used in the coating the screens of Fluoroscopes, as it FLUORESCES under the influence of X-Rays.

    Forgive me if the Paper is incorrect, the guys voice on the video was muffled and I could just about make out Platinum barium cyanide paper, if that is what he said.

    Chemical reactions , what chemicals mix to glow in the dark?
    Anyone?

    jocular


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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I am not sure of the technical term, but I would like to ask some questions about glow in the dark, and elements that glow in the dark.
    Phosphorescence.


    For example a glow stick, what reaction is caused when the tube is cracked and then shook? Anyone?

    A watch face that glows in the dark, the glow and the material that glows, is that an element? Numerals were for many years painted with a radium compound (sulfide?) which glowed in the dark, somewhat dangerous, especially to the workers who used the stuff daily in painting the watch faces. Later TRITIUM gas was used to fill the watch crystal, as it glows in the dark. This, too, I believe, was outlawed.

    If I was to take a piece of Platinum barium cyanide paper outside at night, would that glow? Definitely NOT! Barium Platino-Cyanide was (is) used in the coating the screens of Fluoroscopes, as it FLUORESCES under the influence of X-Rays.

    Forgive me if the Paper is incorrect, the guys voice on the video was muffled and I could just about make out Platinum barium cyanide paper, if that is what he said.

    Chemical reactions , what chemicals mix to glow in the dark?
    Anyone?

    jocular
    I thank you for Phosphorescence, I am not surprised I did not know the word to explain it. I was surprised to see a glow stick was on wikepedia I thought that was just the common name for them, Thank you Dyw for your links.

    I was asking about this due to X-rays and was looking for any similarity in chemical reactions that make Phosphorous light.

    I viewed a video explaining that the chap who invented the x-ray found it by accident as he noticed Barium Platino-Cyanide paper give off a green glow , that was leaked from his blue light test with the funny shaped light bulb and cathoids. I must start remembering what these items and tests are called, I do apologize for that,

    So watching this video and noticing the green light, instantly thought of chemical reaction in glow sticks. So presuming, well sort of knowing light is down to frequency with its different spectrum's , considered that maybe a chemical mix could create x/ray light.

    And viewing this that the sun make light, so the sun gives off X-rays although mixed in with all the frequency ...

    An invisible paint made by a chemical reaction...

    I do understand that this is far fetched to say the least, I just see a connection with the paper that turned green and maybe by frequency a chemical reaction in that paper that makes it happen.
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    i know i know!!!! IT IS FIREFLY (lightning bug) GUTS INSIDE A TUBE! haha i win i win!
    Don't argue with me. You will lose.
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    So watching this video and noticing the green light, instantly thought of chemical reaction in glow sticks. So presuming, well sort of knowing light is down to frequency with its different spectrum's , considered that maybe a chemical mix could create x/ray light.
    It is, as far as I know, impossible for a chemical reaction to create x-rays. There is not enough energy in chemical bonds.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    So watching this video and noticing the green light, instantly thought of chemical reaction in glow sticks. So presuming, well sort of knowing light is down to frequency with its different spectrum's , considered that maybe a chemical mix could create x/ray light.
    It is, as far as I know, impossible for a chemical reaction to create x-rays. There is not enough energy in chemical bonds.
    I was thinking more of a chemical that reacts to the suns energy and the x-ray frequency of light, from the sun,it can pick out as such the right frequency,and the chemical would look like it had disappeared creating a mirage. Similar to the chameleon, or animals or insects that just blend in.

    You say there is not enough energy in chemical bonds, what do you mean by this?

    Do you mean that chemicals have not got much energy output, or that the bond between the molecules is weak?

    Do any chemicals have isotopes? , I understand that these are the cause of radiation output, it that correct, an un eqaul amount of electrons and protons?
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    You say there is not enough energy in chemical bonds, what do you mean by this?
    The energy of a photon is proportional to its frequency. X-rays have high frequency and therefore require a lot of energy to create a photon. Chemistry involves the outer electrons of an atom which are relatively easy to remove from the atom (i.e. little energy required). I don't really understand the mechanisms by which x-rays are created, but I believe it involves the inner electrons of the atom which are more tightly bound (ie. more energy involved).

    Do any chemicals have isotopes? , I understand that these are the cause of radiation output, it that correct, an un eqaul amount of electrons and protons?
    An isotope is an atom with a different number of neutrons - the number of protons and electrons in an atom is always equal.

    So no, chemicals do not have isotopes. Although you can have chemicals containing different isotopes of atoms in them. For example, "heavy" water is water that contains an isotope of hydrogen with an extra neutron.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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    I understand that these are the cause of radiation output, it that correct, an un eqaul amount of electrons and protons?
    I've got a question.
    You say, you 'understand' the above. Where have you obtained such an understanding? I want to make sure I stay away from wherever it might be.
    Its the way nature is!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    [
    An isotope is an atom with a different number of neutrons - the number of protons and electrons in an atom is always equal. Are not IONS atoms having unequal numbers of protons and electrons?

    So no, chemicals do not have isotopes. Chemicals (compounds of several elements) have isoMERS. This simply refers to similar compounds having dissimilar arrangements of the atoms. Like ISO-Propyl (Rubbing) Alcohol, which is an Isomer of Propyl Alcohol..
    jocular
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    Are not IONS atoms having unequal numbers of protons and electrons?
    Ions are not isotopes. They do both start with the letter I. Isomers also begin with the letter I, but alas, they are not isotopes either.
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

    Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
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  13. #12  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Are not IONS atoms having unequal numbers of protons and electrons?
    Indeed. But I could be pedantic and say they are ions and atoms.

    Chemicals (compounds of several elements) have isoMERS. This simply refers to similar compounds having dissimilar arrangements of the atoms. Like ISO-Propyl (Rubbing) Alcohol, which is an Isomer of Propyl Alcohol.
    I was worried about sending theorist off on yet another tangent. Oh well, we'll see what happens. (But I hold you responsible for the chaos that ensues!)
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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    With regards to the watch face, yes, as Radium is commonly used.
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    I apologize I did mean ions, I have miss worded again. I apologize.

    Radium, so this glows green like the paper in the office that helped discover x-rays.

    So could we say that this is an element that picks up x-ray frequencies by its own tendency?,

    So in the dark, could this explain that the X-ray frequency of light travels through the planet to the darker side, been an x-ray, and Radium as the properties to reflect these frequencies? or absorbed or something along these lines....

    again do not think this is me just having wild assumptions, I am just asking the question.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Are not IONS atoms having unequal numbers of protons and electrons?
    Indeed. But I could be pedantic and say they are ions and atoms.

    Chemicals (compounds of several elements) have isoMERS. This simply refers to similar compounds having dissimilar arrangements of the atoms. Like ISO-Propyl (Rubbing) Alcohol, which is an Isomer of Propyl Alcohol.
    I was worried about sending theorist off on yet another tangent. Oh well, we'll see what happens. (But I hold you responsible for the chaos that ensues!)
    Well! I will repeat my friend Bob's iridescent remark, once made to us in feigned indignation: Bob: "Aw, shit!" "What's wrong, Bob?" "I bought the widow's husband's Oldsmobile, drove it home, then for the first time, looked under the hood: Aw, shit. No carburetor!"

    Chaos is now regarded as a good thing, yes? Chaos theory has explained how in the world millions of living muscle cells in a human heart can contract in appropriately-timed synchronism to bring about continued pumping action, repeated billions of times, even as untold numbers of cells die and are replaced. jocular
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    How'd he drive it home with no carb?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    How'd he drive it home with no carb?
    Fuel injection?
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

    Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
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    Bob had a remarkable dry sense of humor. He said what he did, because back then, every average "shade-tree mechanic" was afraid of Electronic Fuel Injection. I must believe Neverfly was being facetious, as no one exists today where carburetors are still exclusive, i think. jocular
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Bob had a remarkable dry sense of humor. He said what he did, because back then, every average "shade-tree mechanic" was afraid of Electronic Fuel Injection. I must believe Neverfly was being facetious, as no one exists today where carburetors are still exclusive, i think. jocular
    No, I wasn't... I guess we are just that old...
    I'm a little embarrassed. It didn't occur to me, when he complained that the carb was missing, that something else might have been in it's place.
    Not too embarrassed though. I'm none too fond of MPFI and I also hate automatic transmissions...

    My Chevy is a '63.
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  21. #20  
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    Why does last post say Wuyiyi is the last poster but the post does not show up when you open the thread?
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