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Thread: What would happen?

  1. #1 What would happen? 
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    What would happen if all the known elements of the periodic table, were to be heated at the same time in one big container , the container been one of the elements?


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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    What would happen if all the known elements of the periodic table, were to be heated at the same time in one big container , the container been one of the elements?
    How much would you like to heat them?

    Would the container be thought of as a "pressure-cooker"?

    jocular


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    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    What would happen if all the known elements of the periodic table, were to be heated at the same time in one big container , the container been one of the elements?
    How much would you like to heat them?



    Would the container be thought of as a "pressure-cooker"?



    jocular
    Hot enough to start to a reaction....

    Yes I would think it would have to be a pressure cooker type situation or a distillery.
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    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Elements would react with other elements in a manner that resulted in lowest energy configurations. However, given that at varying temps some of these elements are in all three phases, the rxns would bias themselves accordingly. Given that there are also an infinite number of chemical rxns based upon the amount of each element, there is no way to predict what would form without knowing more variables.

    What is the temp? What is the molarity? What is the pressure? etc.

    Basically, the whole universe is an example of every known naturally-occurring element interacting in a vacuum at a very low temperature.
    Dywyddyr likes this.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    Would all the isotopes of each element be included in this witche's brew? Some do not exist in nature at all; what about those?

    Hey! Maybe this is finally the long-sought route to making gold from brain-farts! jocular
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Elements would react with other elements in a manner that resulted in lowest energy configurations. However, given that at varying temps some of these elements are in all three phases, the rxns would bias themselves accordingly. Given that there are also an infinite number of chemical rxns based upon the amount of each element, there is no way to predict what would form without knowing more variables.

    What is the temp? What is the molarity? What is the pressure? etc.

    Basically, the whole universe is an example of every known naturally-occurring element interacting in a vacuum at a very low temperature.
    Why low temperature, I thought space had no temperature or are you referring to our atmosphere?
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Elements would react with other elements in a manner that resulted in lowest energy configurations. However, given that at varying temps some of these elements are in all three phases, the rxns would bias themselves accordingly. Given that there are also an infinite number of chemical rxns based upon the amount of each element, there is no way to predict what would form without knowing more variables.

    What is the temp? What is the molarity? What is the pressure? etc.

    Basically, the whole universe is an example of every known naturally-occurring element interacting in a vacuum at a very low temperature.
    Why low temperature, I thought space had no temperature or are you referring to our atmosphere?
    Some say that there's heat left in the space from the explosion and heat that remained after the big bang, the assumed temperature would be 3K (-270C or three degrees Celsius above Absolute Zero).

    Assuming the temperature in space is absolute zero, or no temperature as you may say, is impossible to achieve.

    Absolute zero is a theoretical temperature where the thermal kinetic energy of the molecules in a body goes to zero. This cannot be achieved through artificial or natural means, because there is no way to remove the last small amount of thermal energy. The coldest temperature in space is about 3K above absolute zero. This is defined as the Cosmic Background (or Microwave Background) Radiation that was first detected by Penzias and Wilson using the Holmdel Horn Antenna in New Jersey, USA in 1965. This radiation quite literally is the echo of the Big Bang.

    I must also emphasize that we're speaking of the Observable Universe, the part of the universe that we can actually see which is small compared to what some scientists assume the size of the universe is (infinity?) and claim the universe has no "edge" since the universe should expand until it collapses as some scientists would suggest.

    You might as well would like to read this PDF file I found on NASA's website: What Is the Temperature of Space?
    Last edited by Hassnhadi; March 8th, 2013 at 03:21 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Why low temperature, I thought space had no temperature or are you referring to our atmosphere?
    High and low are relative terms, so I was using them accordingly. The temperature in the vacuum of space is still a couple kelvin on average, but I imagine it varies so I didn't use a specific number.

    EDIT: Or what Hassnhadi said. I never read past the post I quote. I should probably do that.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hassnhadi View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Elements would react with other elements in a manner that resulted in lowest energy configurations. However, given that at varying temps some of these elements are in all three phases, the rxns would bias themselves accordingly. Given that there are also an infinite number of chemical rxns based upon the amount of each element, there is no way to predict what would form without knowing more variables.

    What is the temp? What is the molarity? What is the pressure? etc.

    Basically, the whole universe is an example of every known naturally-occurring element interacting in a vacuum at a very low temperature.
    Why low temperature, I thought space had no temperature or are you referring to our atmosphere?
    Some say that there's heat left in the space from the explosion and heat that remained after the big bang, the assumed temperature would be 3K (-270C or three degrees Celsius above Absolute Zero).

    Assuming the temperature in space is absolute zero, or no temperature as you may say, is impossible to achieve.

    Absolute zero is a theoretical temperature where the thermal kinetic energy of the molecules in a body goes to zero. This cannot be achieved through artificial or natural means, because there is no way to remove the last small amount of thermal energy. The coldest temperature in space is about 3K above absolute zero. This is defined as the Cosmic Background (or Microwave Background) Radiation that was first detected by Penzias and Wilson using the Holmdel Horn Antenna in New Jersey, USA in 1965. This radiation quite literally is the echo of the Big Bang.

    I must also emphasize that we're speaking of the Observable Universe, the part of the universe that we can actually see which is small compared to what some scientists assume the size of the universe is (infinity?) and claim the universe has no "edge" since the universe should expand until it collapses as some scientists would suggest.

    You might as well would like to read this PDF file I found on NASA's website: What Is the Temperature of Space?
    Thank you for the link, I did notice that mass generates more heat than mass on earth would generate.


    quoted from link-The temperatures that objects experience in space are often quite extreme compared to what the same objects would experience here on Earth. For instance, NASA’s bulky white spacesuits that astronauts wear on spacewalks can have
    a temperature difference of up to 275 degrees F from one side to the other. This can happen if an astronaut has one
    side of the suit facing the sun with the other side facing deep space.

    I presume this means moving object<mass>?

    Would the temperature change be the fact that the suit on one side deflects light, building up more heat, similar to the shadow?

    Doe's this show that light, heat passes straight through us and some how our bodies help to neutralize the heat?

    What chemicals is there in the body that could create cold, like a thermostat...is there any chemical in the body that resembles any known chemistry that produces the cold?
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I did notice that mass generates more heat than mass on earth would generate.
    What? Maybe you misread.

    I presume this means moving object<mass>?
    No. It means what it says: one side is in direct sunlight, the other is in shadow.

    Would the temperature change be the fact that the suit on one side deflects light, building up more heat, similar to the shadow?
    What?

    Doe's this show that light, heat passes straight through us
    No.

    and some how our bodies help to neutralize the heat?
    No.

    What chemicals is there in the body that could create cold, like a thermostat...is there any chemical in the body that resembles any known chemistry that produces the cold?
    NOTHING produces cold. Cold does not exist. You have been told this previously. And, apparently, you have no idea what a thermostat is.
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    I still cannot believe the degree of utter ignorance being displayed can be real.
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

    Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexG View Post
    I still cannot believe the degree of utter ignorance being displayed can be real.
    Please define ignorance, I am reading the links and asking questions about the links, asking questions is not ignorance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I did notice that mass generates more heat than mass on earth would generate.
    What? Maybe you misread.

    I miss worded again sorry , I mean what it actually said, just misquoted again. I meant to say, that the heat mass experiences in space.

    I presume this means moving object<mass>?
    No. It means what it says: one side is in direct sunlight, the other is in shadow.

    Yes I know that, but presumed all mass moves in space due to gravity.

    Would the temperature change be the fact that the suit on one side deflects light, building up more heat, similar to the shadow?
    What?

    Meaning something obstructs the light, heat, from reaching the other side of the mass/object.


    Doe's this show that light, heat passes straight through us
    No.

    Around us?

    and some how our bodies help to neutralize the heat?
    No

    Just a wild thought, sorry, considered our temperature in the human body.


    What chemicals is there in the body that could create cold, like a thermostat...is there any chemical in the body that resembles any known chemistry that produces the cold?
    NOTHING produces cold. Cold does not exist. You have been told this previously. And, apparently, you have no idea what a thermostat is.
    Reworded, our body core temperature changes heat , up and down, something warms the blood up, something makes it less warmer at times. Is this not so?
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I miss worded again sorry , I mean what it actually said, just misquoted again. I meant to say, that the heat mass experiences in space.
    So why would you think that "mass in space experiences more heat than on Earth"?

    Yes I know that, but presumed all mass moves in space due to gravity.
    WTF does that have to do with heating?

    Meaning something obstructs the light, heat, from reaching the other side of the mass/object.
    THE OBJECT ITSELF.

    Around us?
    What?
    It's COLD ON THE SHADOW SIDE!

    Just a wild thought, sorry, considered our temperature in the human body.
    Our temperature is generated internally, because we "burn" food.

    Reworded, our body core temperature changes heat , up and down, something warms the blood up, something makes it less warmer at times. Is this not so?
    Our temperature is generated internally, because we "burn" food. We cool down because heat is taken away by convection, conduction and radiation.
    There is no such thing as "cold".
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I miss worded again sorry , I mean what it actually said, just misquoted again. I meant to say, that the heat mass experiences in space.
    So why would you think that "mass in space experiences more heat than on Earth"?

    Atmosphere I would think makes the difference, as atmosphere blocks some of the radiation I think.....not fact I know .just a guess. And do not want to get to deep into what I actually think as you know it sounds like madness.

    Yes I know that, but presumed all mass moves in space due to gravity.
    WTF does that have to do with heating?

    Again was down to some deep thinking and probable mindless garbage.

    Meaning something obstructs the light, heat, from reaching the other side of the mass/object.
    THE OBJECT ITSELF.

    Around us?
    What?
    It's COLD ON THE SHADOW SIDE!

    You said there was no cold......

    Just a wild thought, sorry, considered our temperature in the human body.
    Our temperature is generated internally, because we "burn" food.

    Reworded, our body core temperature changes heat , up and down, something warms the blood up, something makes it less warmer at times. Is this not so?
    Our temperature is generated internally, because we "burn" food. We cool down because heat is taken away by convection, conduction and radiation.
    There is no such thing as "cold".
    What about when our temperature drops?

    And is not my body temperature the same as your body temperature even if you live in a hot climate and \I lived in the north pole?
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Atmosphere I would think makes the difference, as atmosphere blocks some of the radiation I think.
    Now you're getting into individual objects.
    The Earth gets as much heat from the Sun as does anything else in space (at the same distance).

    You said there was no cold......
    There is no "cold" as something in itself. Cold is a lack of heat. On the shadow side there is no heat.

    What about when our temperature drops?
    We cool down because heat is taken away by convection, conduction and radiation.

    And is not my body temperature the same as your body temperature even if you live in a hot climate and \I lived in the north pole?
    Only if you're insulated - you lose heat to the surroundings.
    Why do think you feel cold on a cold day?
    How do people die of hypothermia?
    We cool down because heat is taken away by convection, conduction and radiation.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Atmosphere I would think makes the difference, as atmosphere blocks some of the radiation I think.
    Now you're getting into individual objects.
    The Earth gets as much heat from the Sun as does anything else in space (at the same distance).

    You said there was no cold......
    There is no "cold" as something in itself. Cold is a lack of heat. On the shadow side there is no heat.

    What about when our temperature drops?
    We cool down because heat is taken away by convection, conduction and radiation.

    And is not my body temperature the same as your body temperature even if you live in a hot climate and \I lived in the north pole?
    Only if you're insulated - you lose heat to the surroundings.
    Why do think you feel cold on a cold day?
    How do people die of hypothermia?
    We cool down because heat is taken away by convection, conduction and radiation.
    Thank you for the clarification, so our blood can boil as such, that can happen?
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    Genius Duck Moderator Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    In space blood boiling is not so much anything to do with temperature as the low pressure.
    The lower the pressure (of the atmosphere - and in space there's no atmosphere so no pressure) the lower the boiling point.
    Body temp therefore would enough to cause boiling.
    Note that your blood would only boil if you were cut - it won't boil inside your body because the body (skin etc) maintains pressure (and thus keeps the boiling point high).
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    I agree with flick montana its like universe is an example
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