Notices
Results 1 to 27 of 27
Like Tree4Likes
  • 1 Post By AlexG
  • 1 Post By Strange
  • 1 Post By Neverfly
  • 1 Post By Strange

Thread: Can you see Oxygen Molecules under a microscope?

  1. #1 Can you see Oxygen Molecules under a microscope? 
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Hello, I am not certain whether this is a Physics question, or a Chemistry question.

    Today I started to look at Molecular bonding, and different reactions of elements that create bonding of Atoms.


    The other night I viewed water through a microscope, and was convinced I could see ball like shapes attached by a bar, is this the Oxygen molecule?.

    The reason I ask is to get more of an understanding before I continue.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,848
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    The other night I viewed water through a microscope, and was convinced I could see ball like shapes attached by a bar, is this the Oxygen molecule?.
    No, you cannot see oxygen molecules under a microscope. They are (much) smaller than the wavelength of light and therefore cannot be seen. What you are seeing may be small bubbles, dust, some sort of small organism... It depends where the water came from.


    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    The other night I viewed water through a microscope, and was convinced I could see ball like shapes attached by a bar, is this the Oxygen molecule?.
    No, you cannot see oxygen molecules under a microscope. They are (much) smaller than the wavelength of light and therefore cannot be seen. What you are seeing may be small bubbles, dust, some sort of small organism... It depends where the water came from.
    Thank you Strange for your answer, the water I used was water from my tap. That as put me put me off drinking it. I did not view it the conventional way, I unscrewed the top lense and poured water into the microscope then replaced the lense. So yes was maybe a contamination of dust.
    Thank you for clearing this up, I can now stay on the right path with my learning.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    What kind of microscope are we talking about? You shouldn't have to remove any lenses to view water on a slide. I was also cringing at "poured water onto the microscope".
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Anti-Crank AlexG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,809
    I unscrewed the top lense and poured water into the microscope then replaced the lense
    arKane likes this.
    Its the way nature is!
    If you dont like it, go somewhere else....
    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
    Philosophically more pleasing, more psychologically easy
    Prof Richard Feynman (1979) .....

    Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig, es ist nicht einmal falsch!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I did not view it the conventional way, I unscrewed the top lense and poured water into the microscope then replaced the lense. So yes was maybe a contamination of dust.
    I am now convinced that you are not a troll...
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I can now stay on the right path with my learning.
    Not by pouring water into sensitive equipment you're not... But at least you uhmm... well.
    I can't. I really can't. I almost wanna say "Awww" and hug you.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    What kind of microscope are we talking about? You shouldn't have to remove any lenses to view water on a slide. I was also cringing at "poured water onto the microscope".
    It is not the best of microscopes, a single viewer, I was not viewing the water on a slide, I was trying to enhance through refraction ,light.

    So I filled the top section of the microscope with water. I sore what looked like the Oxygen molecule I had seen on pictures recently.

    But logically I thought there is no way, molecules are too small, so thought I would ask the question, to clear up the wrong thought path.

    I sore , I can only explain as dark sphere shaped blobs, connected by a single arm.........o-o-o, like that but connected together.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I did not view it the conventional way, I unscrewed the top lense and poured water into the microscope then replaced the lense. So yes was maybe a contamination of dust.
    I am now convinced that you are not a troll...
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I can now stay on the right path with my learning.
    Not by pouring water into sensitive equipment you're not... But at least you uhmm... well.
    I can't. I really can't. I almost wanna say "Awww" and hug you.
    Thank you Never. I love science, I wish I could go back and do it all over again and I would of studied more as a youngster.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,848
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I was trying to enhance through refraction ,light.
    It didn't occur t you that the microscope and lens designers might have already determined the best way of using refraction (the use of the right combination of lenses, for example) already.

    I am amazed you saw anything. You certainly won't have seen anything meaningful. Now take the microscopy apart and leave it somewhere warm (not hot) to dry out. Maybe it will still work.

    I sore , I can only explain as dark sphere shaped blobs, connected by a single arm.........o-o-o, like that but connected together.
    It may have been the soul of the dead microscope.
    Dywyddyr likes this.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Apocalyptic Paradise
    Posts
    6,613
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Thank you Never. I love science, I wish I could go back and do it all over again and I would of studied more as a youngster.
    I enjoy scientific study. It's not the only thing I enjoy... but it is a passion.
    But I'm going to be blunt, Theorist.

    The study of things scientific is like building something. You must learn how to build what it is you wish to build before you set about construction of it. Else-wise, you can meet with disaster.
    Here, you have been repeatedly witnessed to try to build first. To the frustration of almost everyone that tries to show you how to build.

    It wasn't a high dollar microscope. But even so, please try to enjoy your enthusiasm while also stopping to think about whether you've gotten ahead of yourself.

    That was when the frustration took a turn for me- Who on Earth would think to put water inside of a microscope and then take a look?

    But you asked about it and considered that you probably had gotten ahead of yourself and you listened - so it's a good sign. Try to do more of it.
    Strange likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I was trying to enhance through refraction ,light.
    It didn't occur t you that the microscope and lens designers might have already determined the best way of using refraction (the use of the right combination of lenses, for example) already.

    I am amazed you saw anything. You certainly won't have seen anything meaningful. Now take the microscopy apart and leave it somewhere warm (not hot) to dry out. Maybe it will still work.

    I sore , I can only explain as dark sphere shaped blobs, connected by a single arm.........o-o-o, like that but connected together.
    It may have been the soul of the dead microscope.

    Yes, I did consider that the designers had designed the product to the best conventional use. How ever, sometimes unconventional methods give the best results.

    The microscope is plastic except the lenses, it is a cheap one, I had no concerns of rust, it was simple to dry out. The top lense just unscrews so there was no force involved or breaking of the apparatus.

    It as an underneath light on it, I added extra light, a torch, magnifying the light through the water, well that was my thoughts on to enhance it..like you said though, dust maybe or some other contamination,

    You have far more powerful microscopes than this, so logic says ,if you tell me you cannot see Oxygen molecules, then I believe dust or contamination to be the result.

    Either way , it was great viewing with light, light creating a strange vortex at the same time, but I put this down to refraction.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,848
    I guess you deserve some credit for experimenting.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    o-o-o, like that but connected together.
    Oxygen wouldn't bind together like that. In water, it would be H30 or OH or H20. O3 would be ozone and if you've got that in significant quantities in your house, you should move immediately.

    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I wish I could go back and do it all over again and I would of studied more as a youngster.
    Not to be rude, but "I'm too old" is bulls*it. I think it was Aristotle who once said, "Education is the best provision for old age." If you plan to keep getting older, you might as well keep being educated as it carries with you for all your life.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,848
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I love science, I wish I could go back and do it all over again and I would of studied more as a youngster.
    Many places run adult education courses (I don't know what country you are in, never mind location, so I can't comment specifically). These are often cheap and a good way to learn. I have done quite a few at my local university on subjects I never studied at college, such as Art History.
    Last edited by Strange; February 8th, 2013 at 10:25 AM.
    Flick Montana likes this.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I love science, I wish I could go back and do it all over again and I would of studied more as a youngster.
    Many places run adult education courses (I don't know what country, never mind location, so I can't comment specifically). These are often cheap and a good way to learn. I have done quite a few at my local university on subjects I never studied at college, such as Art History.
    Absolutely. At my university, we even have a program that let's you build your own degree using specific programs. You work directly with advisors who tailor it to your exact wants.

    Some community colleges offer continuing education if you don't want a degree. Plenty of adults who feel like they missed out on an education head back and take one or two night classes at a time just for their own benefit.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    o-o-o, like that but connected together.
    Oxygen wouldn't bind together like that. In water, it would be H30 or OH or H20. O3 would be ozone and if you've got that in significant quantities in your house, you should move immediately.

    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    I wish I could go back and do it all over again and I would of studied more as a youngster.
    Not to be rude, but "I'm too old" is bulls*it. I think it was Aristotle who once said, "Education is the best provision for old age." If you plan to keep getting older, you might as well keep being educated as it carries with you for all your life.
    I thank you for your help, I live in the UK, it is not that easy to get adult courses in the area where I live. But yes I think I will look into this and see if I can get a course organized.

    I looked up the H30, OH, and h2o molecules. The OH shape and bonding looked similar to what I thought I sore. I researched a bit further to see that carbon monoxide as this bonding effect.

    Would high levels of Carbon monoxide in the air effect water like this, if the water was standing for several minutes?,

    Would the molecules out of the air attach to molecules in the water, or do the molecules that attach to Hydrogen have to be in the water to start with?.

    And please quote me if I have the wrong word with Hydrogen.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,848
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Would high levels of Carbon monoxide in the air effect water like this, if the water was standing for several minutes?,

    Would the molecules out of the air attach to molecules in the water, or do the molecules that attach to Hydrogen have to be in the water to start with?.

    And please quote me if I have the wrong word with Hydrogen.
    First, no (optical) microscope can see atoms. They are "smaller than light". Second, the way you were "using" your microscope means that you were not magnifying things (significantly) anyway.

    I am pretty sure that what you saw were: Floaters
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Would high levels of Carbon monoxide in the air effect water like this, if the water was standing for several minutes?,

    Would the molecules out of the air attach to molecules in the water, or do the molecules that attach to Hydrogen have to be in the water to start with?.

    And please quote me if I have the wrong word with Hydrogen.
    First, no (optical) microscope can see atoms. They are "smaller than light". Second, the way you were "using" your microscope means that you were not magnifying things (significantly) anyway.

    I am pretty sure that what you saw were: Floaters
    It was not floaters what I thought I sore. I have looked at your link and was not that, like you said contamination maybe.

    My question was to get a better concept of how and what process is needed to bond molecules.

    I will just put some questions for yes or no answers.

    1. For Molecules to bond in water, do the molecules have to be in the water to start with or can external source Molecules bond with the surface layers of water?

    2.If I held a carbon rod in a cloud of Hydrogen gas, would the carbon electrons become excited?

    3.Two unknown elements of the periodic table, that do not exsist, if put next to each other, may explode?

    4.Energy is needed to create reaction?

    5.What is the difference between fision and fusion?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  20. #19  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,848
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    1. For Molecules to bond in water, do the molecules have to be in the water to start with or can external source Molecules bond with the surface layers of water?
    It is not clear what you mean by "For Molecules to bond in water". Do you mean for a chemical reaction to take place in water? Or for something to dissolve in water? r react with the water?

    2.If I held a carbon rod in a cloud of Hydrogen gas, would the carbon electrons become excited?
    Nothing would happen.

    3.Two unknown elements of the periodic table, that do not exsist, if put next to each other, may explode?
    There are no unknown elements in the periodic table. The number of protons/electrons increases by 1 as you go up the table. There are no gaps for unknown elements.

    If they don't exist then how are you going to put them next to each other?

    There are certainly elements that will react violently together if they come in contact. I imagine that dropping soidum metal into chlorine gas would be quite dramatic.

    4.Energy is needed to create reaction?
    It depends. Some reactions need energy input to take place. Others release energy.

    5.What is the difference between fision and fusion?
    Fission is where the nucleus of an atom splits to form two smaller atoms.
    Fusion is where two atoms are joined to make a larger atom.

    Both can release energy depending on the amount of energy in the initial versus the final atoms.

    Fusion is what produces energy in the sun: hydrogen atoms combine to form helium.

    NOTE: fusion and fission are nuclear reactions not chemical reactions.

    Chemistry just involves the electrons in atoms; not changes to the nucleus.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
    Reply With Quote  
     

  21. #20  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Thank you Strange for clearing those questions up and the clarification.

    And yes I think my water question could of been worded better. And you answered that with the carbon rod in the hydrogen gas question I think.

    And thank you for clearing up fission and fusion, and the difference between Chemistry and Physics.

    And I meant hypothetically exist for two unknown elements, but again you answered my question with the other quotes, thank you.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  22. #21  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    951
    Can we just move this to the trashcan and move on?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  23. #22  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney View Post
    Can we just move this to the trashcan and move on?
    Yes it can go to the trash can, I have my answers.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  24. #23  
    ***** Participant Write4U's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,245
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney View Post
    Can we just move this to the trashcan and move on?
    Yes it can go to the trash can, I have my answers.
    The shapes you saw probably were imperfections in the microscope lens itself. You did say it was a cheapie instrument.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  25. #24  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Write4U View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney View Post
    Can we just move this to the trashcan and move on?
    Yes it can go to the trash can, I have my answers.
    The shapes you saw probably were imperfections in the microscope lens itself. You did say it was a cheapie instrument.
    I agree the microscope, was not the best microscope, and did consider all the possibilities of contamination. However, I could not see it all the time, It was a when I squinted as there is only the smallest of peep hole.

    It may of simply of been dust...

    I suppose I could try the experiment again.

    I think though , the results would be just contamination.

    I will let you know, I am curious now, so I am going to re run the test and make sure my apparatus is dust free firstly. Then recreate the same test.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  26. #25  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Flatland
    Posts
    5,437
    Regardless of how well you clean the instrument, I promise you that you will not see molecular bonds.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
    Reply With Quote  
     

  27. #26  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,525
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Regardless of how well you clean the instrument, I promise you that you will not see molecular bonds.
    I did take your first answers as fact Flick. However, I am curious, so I did re-run the same test.

    Result- This time I sore nothing like what I had previous seen.

    Conclusion - Contamination

    The second test , I did not see what I had seen in the first test. This time however, I did see something different.

    This time the water leaked through my microscope, and left, I can only explain as a mosaic looking residue.

    This was interesting viewing, even though I was not sure what I was viewing.

    On tilting the microscope , on an angle to the side, so I could just catch a glimpse of what I was viewing, this seemed to turn a 2d image, into a 3d image. The flat 2d mosaic effect, becoming 3d hills.

    Refraction of light at its best.

    I have not thought anything of this, except refraction.

    I thank you all, and will continue with my learning.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  28. #27  
    Cooking Something Good MacGyver1968's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    2,051
    An atom of hydrogen is one angstrom wide...that's .1 nm. Visible light is somewhere around 400 nm in wavelength. The atom is a factor of 4000 smaller. You could never see it with light.
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Looks like the IPCC is now going under the microscope
    By Wild Cobra in forum Environmental Issues
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: June 14th, 2010, 09:28 PM
  2. Microscope to see bacteria
    By icewendigo in forum Biology
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 7th, 2010, 08:30 PM
  3. Microscope Inquiries
    By monkeyboy in forum Biology
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 3rd, 2009, 06:43 PM
  4. USB Microscope
    By carlosbrolotobar in forum Biology
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 23rd, 2008, 04:17 PM
  5. microscope images
    By hannah in forum Biology
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 30th, 2006, 09:07 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •