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Thread: Chemical formula of the fire?

  1. #1 Chemical formula of the fire? 
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    What is the chemical formula of a flame, for example the flame of a lighter. Yes, it is energy, but what kind of elements is it composed by?


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    As as I know there isn't a chemical formula for a flame, the flame is just the visible portion of fire. Fire is the rapid oxidation of a material in the exothermic chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products. Almost anything can produce fire it is just a question of getting enough oxygen to react with another substance. Depending on the substances alight, and any impurities outside, the colour of the flame and the fire's intensity will be different.


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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    A flame is just hot gas due to combustion so it doesn't really have a chemical formula. However, a lighter burns butane (I think) so the formula for the burning of that is:
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    As as I know there isn't a chemical formula for a flame, the flame is just the visible portion of fire. Fire is the rapid oxidation of a material in the exothermic chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products. Almost anything can produce fire it is just a question of getting enough oxygen to react with another substance. Depending on the substances alight, and any impurities outside, the colour of the flame and the fire's intensity will be different.
    What does "the flame is just the visible portion of fire" mean? Is there also an invisible part of fire? Sorry but these topics make me very curious
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madets View Post

    What does "the flame is just the visible portion of fire" mean? Is there also an invisible part of fire? Sorry but these topics make me very curious
    lol, there isn't an invisible part of fire, but we can't always see the changes taking place with fuel source of the fire, where as the flame is what we can see of the chemical reaction that is taking place.
    Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it. - confucius
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Madets View Post

    What does "the flame is just the visible portion of fire" mean? Is there also an invisible part of fire? Sorry but these topics make me very curious
    lol, there isn't an invisible part of fire, but we can't always see the changes taking place with fuel source of the fire, where as the flame is what we can see of the chemical reaction that is taking place.
    Clear, thank Chris!
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    The flame is light... gammas rays of photons presumably. The gamma rays must be locked up inside the particals that go into the chemical reaction (fire) and realised or 'liberated' into the atmosphere by the chemical reaction.

    Can any body tell me what is a spark that comes from a flint? is it an ellectron? is it due to an atom(s) in the flint splitting?
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    Chemical formula of fire is:

    CH4(O.H.)(OH.)(CH3.)(O.)2(O2)(HCO.)(M.)(CxHx.)

    It's highly reactive radical species.
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    Quote Originally Posted by question for you View Post
    The flame is light... gammas rays of photons presumably. The gamma rays must be locked up inside the particals that go into the chemical reaction (fire) and realised or 'liberated' into the atmosphere by the chemical reaction.

    Can any body tell me what is a spark that comes from a flint? is it an ellectron? is it due to an atom(s) in the flint splitting?
    Not gamma. Gamma rays are not within the visible radiation spectrum.

    When you strike a piece of steel against flint, the particles of iron in the steel spontaneously oxidize when exposed to the oxygen in the air. It's the same reaction as rusting, but happens a lot faster. Rusting occurs slower because of the layer of oxide that forms at the surface.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by question for you View Post
    The flame is light... gammas rays of photons presumably. The gamma rays must be locked up inside the particals that go into the chemical reaction (fire) and realised or 'liberated' into the atmosphere by the chemical reaction.

    Can any body tell me what is a spark that comes from a flint? is it an ellectron? is it due to an atom(s) in the flint splitting?
    Not gamma. Gamma rays are not within the visible radiation spectrum.

    When you strike a piece of steel against flint, the particles of iron in the steel spontaneously oxidize when exposed to the oxygen in the air. It's the same reaction as rusting, but happens a lot faster. Rusting occurs slower because of the layer of oxide that forms at the surface.
    Hahaha! Gamma! Nuclear flint, gfg! ^_________________________________________________ ____________________^
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    Quote Originally Posted by question for you View Post
    The flame is light... gammas rays of photons presumably. The gamma rays must be locked up inside the particals that go into the chemical reaction (fire) and realised or 'liberated' into the atmosphere by the chemical reaction.
    Definitely not gamma rays, or they would not be visible. And there isn't enough energy released by chemical reactions to release gamma rays. Just photons of visible light from the heat of reaction.

    Can any body tell me what is a spark that comes from a flint? is it an ellectron? is it due to an atom(s) in the flint splitting?
    I think it just a very hot piece of the flint.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Quote Originally Posted by question for you View Post
    The flame is light... gammas rays of photons presumably. The gamma rays must be locked up inside the particals that go into the chemical reaction (fire) and realised or 'liberated' into the atmosphere by the chemical reaction.
    Others have already corrected you, but I'll add two bits anyway. Gamma rays are not emitted by ordinary fire (the energies are orders of magnitude too low in fire to do so). In addition, such rays are not "locked up" inside particles beforehand. Photons (of which gamma rays are composed) are created at the time of emission. They aren't held in a "photon storage warehouse" ahead of time.

    As to the original question about visible and invisible emission from flames, a typical flame emits electromagnetic energy over a very broad frequency range, from long-wave infrared to ultraviolet. Very hot flames can emit dangerous amounts of UV light, which is why welders need to wear goggles to protect their eyes.

    Can any body tell me what is a spark that comes from a flint? is it an ellectron? is it due to an atom(s) in the flint splitting?
    Someone -- Strange, I think -- has answered this for you. The spark you see from flint is not an electron (you can't see electrons), but a bit of flint that is hot enough to incandesce. Atoms aren't splitting (but they are splitting from each other, meaning that some of the chemical bonds that hold the flint together are breaking).
    Write4U and question for you like this.
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Credit where it is due: Harold's answer was better (and first).
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Thank you all for those answer
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    Quote Originally Posted by webmaster View Post
    Hello,
    C3H8 + 5O2 --> 3CO2 + 4H20 i think it is...
    For propane, yes.
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
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    Fire or flame is called a catalyst in a chemical reaction. It is just a form of energy that involves no chemistry itself. Normally such burning here on earth is a form of oxidation. Paper, for instance, can spontaneously combust when brought to a temperature of 451 degrees Fahrenheit and above. The cellulose in the paper combines chemically with oxygen at or above that temperature under an ambient atmospheric pressure of normal oxygen content. So the continued fire and observable flame thereafter is the embodiment of the heat energy given off by this chemical chain reaction called burning.
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    Quote Originally Posted by forrest noble View Post
    Fire or flame is called a catalyst in a chemical reaction.
    That wording makes it sound a bit like flame or fire is a "thing"; but certainly heat is required to cause or start some chemical reactions. And that heat may make itself visible (as a flame).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by forrest noble View Post
    Fire or flame is called a catalyst in a chemical reaction.
    That wording makes it sound a bit like flame or fire is a "thing"; but certainly heat is required to cause or start some chemical reactions. And that heat may make itself visible (as a flame).
    Yes, I consider both words "flame" and "fire" as "things" since both are nouns and are not persons or places
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