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Thread: Home Titration

  1. #1 Home Titration 
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    I'm just learning about acid-base reactions and titrations. We did a titration at school with Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Hydroxide.
    I want to practice doing titrations at home but I'm unsure what acid, base and indicator to use.

    I don't want to use Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Hydroxide. Can I use everyday acids and bases? And if so what indicator do I need to use?


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    Quote Originally Posted by walker8476 View Post
    I'm just learning about acid-base reactions and titrations. We did a titration at school with Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Hydroxide.
    I want to practice doing titrations at home but I'm unsure what acid, base and indicator to use.

    I don't want to use Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Hydroxide. Can I use everyday acids and bases? And if so what indicator do I need to use?
    You can't lol. You need to use strong acid and strong base or it will not work. Like, if you use acetic acid with baking soda, the titration curve will be very different because it forms a buffer solution and obeys to Henderson Hasselbach equation. So to practice, you need to do with with HCl and NaOH but not at home. However, if you ONLY look to determine the final quantity, it could work if you have litmus papers, phenolphtalein or other acid-base indicators.

    A buffer solution will form intermediate species which resist pH variation so until all those species have been de-protonated or protonated, the pH will only slightly vary and it can be very misleading and hard to titrate because the color will turn all of a sudden and you won't know if you went over or not.


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    If you don't like high molarity, you could simply use dilluted Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Hydroxide.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

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    Oxycodone, how much oxycodone do you take to get this dingy?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxycodone View Post
    You can't lol. You need to use strong acid and strong base or it will not work. Like, if you use acetic acid with baking soda, the titration curve will be very different because it forms a buffer solution and obeys to Henderson Hasselbach equation. So to practice, you need to do with with HCl and NaOH but not at home. However, if you ONLY look to determine the final quantity, it could work if you have litmus papers, phenolphtalein or other acid-base indicators.

    A buffer solution will form intermediate species which resist pH variation so until all those species have been de-protonated or protonated, the pH will only slightly vary and it can be very misleading and hard to titrate because the color will turn all of a sudden and you won't know if you went over or not.


    Could I use vinegar and sodium hydroxide?

    I basically want to practice adding the standard to the analyte until the indicator changes colour without going one drop over.
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    Quote Originally Posted by walker8476 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Oxycodone View Post
    You can't lol. You need to use strong acid and strong base or it will not work. Like, if you use acetic acid with baking soda, the titration curve will be very different because it forms a buffer solution and obeys to Henderson Hasselbach equation. So to practice, you need to do with with HCl and NaOH but not at home. However, if you ONLY look to determine the final quantity, it could work if you have litmus papers, phenolphtalein or other acid-base indicators.

    A buffer solution will form intermediate species which resist pH variation so until all those species have been de-protonated or protonated, the pH will only slightly vary and it can be very misleading and hard to titrate because the color will turn all of a sudden and you won't know if you went over or not.


    Could I use vinegar and sodium hydroxide?

    I basically want to practice adding the standard to the analyte until the indicator changes colour without going one drop over.
    You still have a buffer solution lol:

    Chemistry: Buffers — FactMonster.com

    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    If you don't like high molarity, you could simply use dilluted Hydrochloric Acid and Sodium Hydroxide.
    This.
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