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Thread: Organizing the Periodic Table

  1. #1 Organizing the Periodic Table 
    Forum Junior epidecus's Avatar
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    The periodic table is arranged according to each element's unique atomic structure and chemical properties. Elements of atomic number 57-71 and 89-103 are separated into their own block, with respective rows called the Lanthanides and the Actinides.

    Is this separation done for convenience of interpretation, or accuracy of grouping? It's never been clear to me which is the case. Contributing answers much appreciated.


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    Elements are divided into three major classifications. Metals, non-metals and metalloids. The metals form the first 12 groups of the periodic table, and the heavier elements in groups 13, 14 and 15 include alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, transition metals, rare earth metals and other metals. The other metals are the metals in groups 13, 14 and 15. The metalloids form stairsteps in groups 13, 14, 15 and 16. Non-metals fill in the columns anchored by the other metals (14, 15 and 16), while the halogens represent column 17 and the noble gases form group 18.




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  4. #3  
    Forum Junior epidecus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    Elements are divided into three major classifications. Metals, non-metals and metalloids. The metals form the first 12 groups of the periodic table, and the heavier elements in groups 13, 14 and 15 include alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, transition metals, rare earth metals and other metals. The other metals are the metals in groups 13, 14 and 15. The metalloids form stairsteps in groups 13, 14, 15 and 16. Non-metals fill in the columns anchored by the other metals (14, 15 and 16), while the halogens represent column 17 and the noble gases form group 18.

    Okay, thanks

    As for the separation of the Lanthanides and Actinides, does it hold some physical significance? I've been told the wide-version of the periodic table has them arranged in a more proper fashion. If so, then why does the standard version have them separated like that?
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    those are f orbitals, they are separated for convenience because the table would be very long if they were put together.
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    Forum Junior epidecus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxycodone View Post
    those are f orbitals, they are separated for convenience because the table would be very long if they were put together.
    So does that mean the standard version is slightly made inaccurate for convenience? I've always wondered...
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  7. #6  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by epidecus View Post
    So does that mean the standard version is slightly made inaccurate for convenience? I've always wondered...
    It is more like those maps of the USA where they show Alaska and Hawai'i in separate boxes rather than waste a lot of empty paper.

    If you included those elements in the table, as normal, it would just get really wide with not much other information in the middle.
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    ***** Participant Write4U's Avatar
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    http://www.filtersfast.com/articles/...odic-table.gif

    As an old bookkeeper, this looks pretty well organized, maintaining a chronology.

    The lanthanide series consists of the 14 elements, with atomic numbers 58 through 71, that follow lanthanum on the periodic table of elements. These 14, along with the actinides—atomic numbers 90 through 103—are set aside from the periodic table due to similarities in properties that define each group.
    I find it interesting that each type consists of 14 atomic numbers. It seems to confirm a certain elemental relationship.
    Last edited by Write4U; September 20th, 2012 at 05:04 PM.
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    Forum Professor arKane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Write4U View Post
    http://www.filtersfast.com/articles/...odic-table.gif

    As an old bookkeeper, this looks pretty well organized, maintaining a chronology.

    The lanthanide series consists of the 14 elements, with atomic numbers 58 through 71, that follow lanthanum on the periodic table of elements. These 14, along with the actinides—atomic numbers 90 through 103—are set aside from the periodic table due to similarities in properties that define each group.
    I find it interesting that each type consists of 13 atomic numbers. It seems to confirm a certain elemental relationship.
    I thought you could use a better picture. This is one of the better tables I've seen.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Professor arKane's Avatar
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    Oops, found another one I like.

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  11. #10  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    There is a full-width periodic table at the bottom of some Wikipedia element pages, for example: Lanthanum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Oh, this is even better: the main page for this template allows you to get all sorts of different views, such as period of discovery: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templat...ery_periods%29

    Cool.
    Last edited by Strange; September 20th, 2012 at 07:13 PM.
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  12. #11  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    When I look at a periodic table I can understand why some people think there must be a god.
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  13. #12  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    When I look at a periodic table I can understand why some people think there must be a god.
    And a very well-organised one who loves organising and filing things.
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  14. #13  
    ***** Participant Write4U's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    When I look at a periodic table I can understand why some people think there must be a god.
    And a very well-organised one who loves organising and filing things.
    IMO, it also proves that there is no "irreducible complexity"
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    Forum Junior epidecus's Avatar
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    It really is a good example as to the reasoning behind some creationists. However, once one takes the time to think about it, he'll find that it's not a case of miracle, as the organization is based off natural, observed trends and properties in the elements. And these patterns themselves I'm sure are perfectly explained by atomic structure and quantum properties. I'm not sure why consistent patterns in nature should imply intelligent intervention?
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    Forum Junior epidecus's Avatar
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    Anyway, is the wide format, say, a more natural idealistic version than the standard one?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Write4U View Post
    http://www.filtersfast.com/articles/...odic-table.gif

    As an old bookkeeper, this looks pretty well organized, maintaining a chronology.

    The lanthanide series consists of the 14 elements, with atomic numbers 58 through 71, that follow lanthanum on the periodic table of elements. These 14, along with the actinides—atomic numbers 90 through 103—are set aside from the periodic table due to similarities in properties that define each group.
    I find it interesting that each type consists of 14 atomic numbers. It seems to confirm a certain elemental relationship.
    It's because for those atoms, the valence electrons are in the f orbital which contains a maximum of 14 electrons so the 14 atomic numbers are the atoms who fill the f orbital with 1, 2, 3...14 electrons.
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  18. #17  
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    Thanks everyone for your contributions.
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