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Thread: O Fe and C

  1. #1 O Fe and C 
    Forum Radioactive Isotope sculptor's Avatar
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    I brought this over from the earth sciences ---why has H2O stayed liquid:

    would an oxygen atom be more likely to join with an iron atom, or with a carbon atom?
    reference; early atmosphere


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    No , You are wrong

    water is existing in the three matter states

    when seawater evaporates , it gonna be a water vapor , " The gaseous state "

    And when it raises to the atmosphere it solidified , " The solid state "


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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    I brought this over from the earth sciences ---why has H2O stayed liquid:

    would an oxygen atom be more likely to join with an iron atom, or with a carbon atom?
    reference; early atmosphere
    You would have to do a full thermodynamic analysis to be sure (and I hated that when I studied chemistry) but I think the reaction favours iron oxide. But it is probably temperature dependant.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahmed2012 View Post
    And when it raises to the atmosphere it solidified , " The solid state "
    This comment wasn't really relevant to the question asked. However, it will only enter the solid state if it is cold enough (snow or hail) otherwise it will stay a liquid. Although there is also a proportion of gaseous water in the atmosphere.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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    The free energy change for the formation of iron oxide (Fe2O3) is -742 kJ/mol while the free energy change for the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) is -137 kJ/mol. This means that there is a greater tendency for iron and oxygen to react to form iron oxide compared to the tendency of carbon and oxygen to react to form carbon monoxide. The free energy for the formation of the oxide Fe3O4 is even higher at -1015 kJ/mol.

    Moreover, the activation energy for the reaction between carbon and oxygen is high, which is why coal (carbon) does not burn spontaneously in air or even in pure oxygen.
    "The end of the evolution of the chemical elements was the spark that started another evolution journey the evolution of life on Earth." From The Cosmic History of The Elements by M. Eesa
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    I brought this over from the earth sciences ---why has H2O stayed liquid:

    would an oxygen atom be more likely to join with an iron atom, or with a carbon atom?
    reference; early atmosphere
    Well, think of it this way: what's more likely to rust? An iron bar or a graphite bar? LOL
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