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Thread: Why does water splash.

  1. #1 Why does water splash. 
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    After searching on the internet and a several other resources for a few days now, time is running short on a project I have due soon. I can not come up with an adequate hypothesis to support my claims about water splashing.

    HELP!


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    errr water is a liquid since its atom dont hold up like solid when it drop it have to spread all over the place since nothing cant hold them together. thats wat i think :-D


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    Yes.

    Being a liquid its atoms are not as strongly knit together, so the atoms to keep their shape. When you drop it, it forms a drop-shape in the air. When it hits the ground the atoms spread out, bounce back up, and become undone from the main mass of water you first dropped.
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    Quote Originally Posted by The P-manator
    Yes.

    Being a liquid its atoms are not as strongly knit together, so the atoms to keep their shape. When you drop it, it forms a drop-shape in the air. When it hits the ground the atoms spread out, bounce back up, and become undone from the main mass of water you first dropped.
    Why does it bounce back up?
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  6. #5 Re: Why does water splash. 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven B
    After searching on the internet and a several other resources for a few days now, time is running short on a project I have due soon. I can not come up with an adequate hypothesis to support my claims about water splashing.

    HELP!
    I am wondering whether this might be a homework question, I'll treat it as if it is

    Consider the problem from the point of view of force and the force(s) on the individual areas of the fluid - Suppose you dropped a long handled china pot as the pot hits the deck the handle will try to keep falling - the handle will detach from the pot - how does the energy dissipate.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven B
    Why does it bounce back up?
    Because of the kinetic energy. Why does a tennis ball bounce back up? Same principle.
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    But what excactly does kinetic energy have to do with it? When I simply say, "Kinetic energy causes it to bounce back up" he would tell me, "What makes it"? :/ *sadface*
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    It has something to do with the molecular strength of the object. Water, as we have determined, has little. When the object is travelling it has a certain amount of energy. When it hits something, some of the energy is absorbed by the impact, but some causes the object to bounce back. I think that's what I read somewhere.
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    Why when you jump into a pool of water does it splash back up, instead of just displacing?

    Is it the same thing?

    Imagine dropping a group of losely glued together tennis balls... what happens?


    Err... I know nothing.




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    That's what I was trying to explain.
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    Is no one answering this.

    I'm thinking newton's third law of motion + bonds between water particles.
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  13. #12  
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    One more answer
    Quote Originally Posted by jp1989
    Is no one answering this. ... ....
    Because it couldn’t flow intact
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    Well, if its properties were such that it didn't splash, then it simply wouldn't flow either. So that's not really a 'why.'

    Really I'd say the strength of the hydrogen bonding between the molecules of water is simply weak enough to be overcome by the kinetic energy involved in a water drop or whatever striking a surface, so it breaks apart and splashes.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
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    I think he's asking why a small portion of the water will shoot high up into the air. Obviously there's some mechanism that allows a disproportionate amount of the falling object's kinetic energy to transfer into a small amount of the water that it's falling into, so that a little bit of it is flung high into the air while the rest of it just flows around and gets a little turbulent...but exactly what that mechanism is, I have no idea.
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    You never stated you hypothesis, thus how are we to concurr or correct?
    Actually it 's a simple transfer of momentum and kinetic enegy, think about it and get back to us.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney
    You never stated you hypothesis, thus how are we to concurr or correct?
    Actually it 's a simple transfer of momentum and kinetic enegy, think about it and get back to us.
    exactly!!!

    it would take ages to explain the 'bounce' - is this what you are looking for specifically???

    things can and do bounce - if we were able to zoom in to the 'splash' you may even see the boundary layer is far more violent then it looks from your 'blurred' perspective (light is too big a wave length for you to see 'atoms')...................with lots of bouncing!!! - some will bounce more than others at a localised level which will be seen by you (the observer) to be travelling faster or slower then other areas for a number of a great many reasons - that could be defined as the movement and direction of the 'splash' (using Particle theory and the Atomic model as the basis to represent your argument).

    maybe this is more of a physics question then chemistry!!!!?????
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  18. #17 Re: Why does water splash. 
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    The answer to this is very simple. Water is virtually incompressible, so when something with the need to displace other water ( a.k.a. has kinetic energy and hits a body of water. ) comes in contact with other water, it doesn't compress it, but displaces it. The only way to do this is for the water directly around to shoot up, because water underneath a gravitational pull must reduce its surface area to reduce surface energy, so it's already taken up all the area parallel to it. When this water comes down, the water around it has to shoot up ( including the area the original drop fell. ) This process continues until all of the kinetic energy has converted to heat from friction in-between water molecules.
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  19. #18  
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    Cool, thanks Joanofarc43 that truly answered the question: not bounce, splash.

    I'm unsure about the role of gravity though. See Youtube - Waves in a Large Free Sphere of Water (in microgravity!).
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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    We should also explain about the polar forces between the water molecules. (aka "Hydrogen Bonding") Since the O atom has larger orbitals than the H atoms, (or, more electronegativity) it tends to hog the electrons it shares with the H - the H atoms don't get their electrons to orbit themselves very long with a much smaller orbital radius.

    This makes a water molecule polar - sure it has a neutral charge, but the 'bottom' of it is more negative due to the large Oxygen hogging the electrons. The upper mickey mouse ears - the Hydrogens - tend to be more positive. This makes a polar molecule that interacts with other water molecules, tending to make them more 'sticky' with each other - it's how you get a bead of water on a surface - the tension of polar molecules draws it into a sphere to some extent.

    That's why you'll get a 'fountain' of water coming up from the central shockwaves of a splash.

    Water is cool. It's unique. As my old Chem prof told us once, "It's just barely a liquid." the next hour - in the study center during our free time - was an informal but irreplaceable lecture on water.
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    Quote Originally Posted by C_Sensei
    We should also explain about the polar forces between the water molecules. (aka "Hydrogen Bonding") Since the O atom has larger orbitals than the H atoms, (or, more electronegativity) it tends to hog the electrons it shares with the H - the H atoms don't get their electrons to orbit themselves very long with a much smaller orbital radius.

    This makes a water molecule polar - sure it has a neutral charge, but the 'bottom' of it is more negative due to the large Oxygen hogging the electrons. The upper mickey mouse ears - the Hydrogens - tend to be more positive. This makes a polar molecule that interacts with other water molecules, tending to make them more 'sticky' with each other - it's how you get a bead of water on a surface - the tension of polar molecules draws it into a sphere to some extent.

    That's why you'll get a 'fountain' of water coming up from the central shockwaves of a splash.

    Water is cool. It's unique. As my old Chem prof told us once, "It's just barely a liquid." the next hour - in the study center during our free time - was an informal but irreplaceable lecture on water.
    hehe......................and how many more do we want to add??!! local temperature & pressure differences.............etc, etc........ difficult question to answer with short quick posts!!
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    true - but a high school teacher is probably looking for only the basic principles.
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    Randomly found this in a Google search and loved the thought exercise! To me, it sounds a bit like how do planes fly or why does the shower curtain float into the shower because it's just one mechanism producing the result.

    The falling object's mass, shape, and velocity will produce a splash with a distinct profile built from several mechanisms.

    #1, Newton & fluid dynamics
    I believe Joanofarc43 pretty well nailed down one source of splash.
    Let's say a bowling ball contacts and displaces water molecules they will slow down the ball with equal and opposite reactions before traveling on to collide with the next water molecule and some of the energy from the ball is lost in this way. For a small number of water molecules, the net result of the reactionary forces of their collisions will send them hurtling back toward the ball at a variety of angles.

    As they contact the ball, the shape and motion of it will allow these water molecules to form a wave traveling along the ball, but in the opposite direction. The waves along the ball will meet on the opposite side with the net result forcing the wave up. As any portion of wave reaches the surface of water, its inertia will carry it into the air in direction it was already traveling for a short time.

    Try to imagine the splash from a bowling ball as the wave collides on the trailing end of it (a powerful, but narrowly focused cone of splash.) Compare this to the splash from a heavy flat disc like a barbell weight. The wave around the disc will reach the surface before it meets itself and the splash instead looks like a cone traveling quickly outwards.

    #2, a mechanism from fluid dynamics, less Newtonian...
    As the falling object gets larger and faster, it becomes more likely that its inertia will carry it through the space faster than Newton's reactionary wave can fill the space back in. In this way a bowling ball displaces the water as it enters the space, but as it continues on it creates a vacuum in the space it had just occupied.

    Water then rushes in from all sides (except the top) to fill the void and meeting with great energy in the center. Since there is no significant wave from above the vacuum, the net vector of this collision will be a large wave which shoots up and out of the water. We could call this the "Thunder Splash," because just like the sound created after a lightning strike, it is the rush of fluid to fill the vacuum that creates the effect


    At least that's what makes sense to me, but I could be completely wrong
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    About the why it bounce question.
    Imagine two water molecules, one on top of the other, falling to a hard surface. Their attractive force and repelsive force balance each other. The bottom molecule hits the surface, but the top molecule keep falling until the repeling force overcome its downward momentum, then it accelerates up. We see that as bouncing.
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