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Thread: Capturing smoke emissions

  1. #1 Capturing smoke emissions 
    Forum Freshman
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    Does anyone know of an effective way to capture the smoke from a fire, (typically an insualted fire, because it seems to me hard to collect from a bonfire.), such as filtering through liquid, or something else?

    The reason Im asking is both because I would like to conceal as much of any excess fumes I create when messing around with fire (as in, visually, which I'd figured would be practical for anyone living in suburbs or similiar), but also because I would like to capture the waste (likely to be created by incomplete combustion), and investigate further.

    I've been searching around the net, But besides "liquid smoke", (used i flavoring food), and tar production, I could not find anything which would turn the actual waste of smoke into a similar product.

    when burning wood, and making oxides, the primary content of the smoke seems to be CO2, and CO. It partially explains why smoke passing through for example plain water, will mostly remain as thick when leaving the water, as it was when it entered, since only 1.45g (wiki) of the CO2 is soluble in water.
    Passing the smoke through an oxide/hydroxide will turn it into a carbonate, but that is rather pointless if one is creating an oxide in the first place.

    One usage I could think of, is to increase carbon levels in soil, as soil with high carbon content hold nutrients much better than low carbon soil, but I must first find a Cheap way to gather the carbon bi-product made. Preferably i liquid form, but if solid carbon is easier, Im all ears.

    Of course, not ALL the smoke has to be captured, but the less smoke that shows from my fires, the better.

    Thanks in advance


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  3. #2  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
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    "insualted "

    ????


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  4. #3  
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    Insulated, like a kiln, or otherwhise contained so the smoke is easy to harness.

    I guess increasing the solubility in water is a good start. increasing the PH seems to be one way to do it, and for the purpose of using in agriculture, potassium is an obvious choice, but im quite unsure of how this would work. I lack a PH-meter (i know, its a must in chemistry), but I do know that potash is above PH 9, because it gives an exothermic reaction to aluminum.

    It would be nice to know if anyone have tried something similar, before I go ahead with trial, and (potentially uneeded) errors.
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  5. #4  
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    I used to do this in the laboratory. My purpose was to collect the smoke and vapors of various vegetation when it burned, and to analyze the products.

    The method was to draw off the combustion products through a paper filter and then pass it into glassware. The glass was chilled with dry ice and the products condensed on the inner walls of the glass. I could then test the residue on the filter paper and elute the condensate from the glass walls with suitable solvents.
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