Notices
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Sodium Fluoride

  1. #1 Sodium Fluoride 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3
    Which ion in sodium fluoride is the most responsible for the reduction in tooth decay?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3
    oh, right, the fluoride ion


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3
    I guess the question should have been,

    what actions are peformed by the fluoride to aid in decay prevention?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4 demineralization 
    Forum Sophomore REV ROSWELL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    OHSOVERYFAREASTTENNESSEE
    Posts
    153
    I feel that floride does not help with the prevention of dental carries. The commonly accepted science is that is dental carries are caused by demineralization of the tooth surface by bacteria.

    Hmmmm....Maybe maybe not....[/color][/b]
    SPACE TIME IS THE BLOOD OF GOD
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    38
    maybe its the alkali neutralizing the acid that kills ur teeth?
    no time for lots of things
    must save time
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Sophomore REV ROSWELL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    OHSOVERYFAREASTTENNESSEE
    Posts
    153
    Yes could be, hey, should I just brush with some caustic soda?

    Maybe when we were true omnivores, is that correct spelling'? anyway maybe all the sticks and brush that we were eating, as well as the plant alkaloids kept out teeth clean, and hand in a non virirga way.

    ps this is a semi serious post., most of was intended to be hurmrous.

    : { >
    SPACE TIME IS THE BLOOD OF GOD
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman Leukocyte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    56
    from wikipedia:

    Fluoride ions replace hydroxide ions in calcium hydroxyapatite, Ca5[(PO4)3OH], in teeth, forming calcium fluoroapatite, Ca5[(PO4)3F], which is more chemically stable and dissolves at a pH of 4.5, compared to 5.5 pH for calcium hydroxyapatite. This is generally believed to lead to fewer cavities, since stronger acids are needed to attack the tooth enamel.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •