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Thread: Things that activated carbon can filter?

  1. #1 Things that activated carbon can filter? 
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    Hello, I'm a high school student and I have to design my own experiment but I need some help. I am making my own activated carbon and testing how well it filters water of impurities by dying some sort of chemical, putting it in water, filtering the solution through the activated carbon, and testing the remaining solution using a spec 20 to see how well the carbon filtered it. My question is, what are possible chemicals that I can dissolve in the solution that the carbon can filter out, and what type of dyes would work well to dye this chemical? Your help is EXTREMELY appreciated!!! Thank you!


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  3. #2  
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    It might be an idea to try several different additives without knowing whether or not they'll work- it would add another dimension to your experiment as you could speculate on why they were/weren't filtered.


    Dramatisation; may not have happened.
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  4. #3  
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    Hi there,

    The most common household water filters use what are known as activated carbon granules (sometimes called active carbon or AC) based on charcoal. Charcoal is like a cross between the graphite "lead" in a pencil and a sponge. It has a huge internal surface area, packed with nooks and crannies, that attract and trap chemical impurities through a process called adsorption (where liquids or gases become trapped by solids or liquids). But while charcoal is great for removing many common impurities (including chlorine-based chemicals introduced during waste-water purification, some pesticides, and industrial solvents), it can't cope with "hardness" (limescale), heavy metals (unless a special type of activated carbon filter is used), sodium, nitrates, fluorine, or microbes.

    Hope you will now be cleared a bit.

    Regards,
    - Levitsky hawlk.
    Levitsky hawlk

    Fisher Scientific
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  5. #4  
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    Filtration refers to the removal of solids from a liquid (or a gas). Activated carbon will filter solids, but if you are dissolving your chemical in water it is no longer a solid and you will be testing for adsorption, not filtration. Also, if you dye the chemical before dissolving it, what will you be measuring on the outlet from the carbon - the concentration of the chemical or the concentration of the dye? For instance, if you take table salt and dye it with an organic dye then dissolve it in water, the carbon will probably let most of the salt solution through, but capture much of the dye so the dye concentration tells you nothing about how much salt was captured.

    You can find a list of chemicals that activated carbon will adsorb at several websites, including this one:

    http://www.lenntech.com/library/adso...adsorption.htm

    OK, I just noticed the date of the OP. And the post above this one is spam.
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  6. #5  
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    Can use copper sulfate solution, CuSO4.
    Then prepare some sodium hydroxide NaOH.
    These two substances can produce cupric hydroxide Cu (OH) 2; also copper oxide CuO.
    To test the carbon adsorption, carbon adsorption effect of ordinary low. You try
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