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Thread: Na or NaO

  1. #1 Na or NaO 
    Forum Bachelors Degree The P-manator's Avatar
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    Can I get Na or NaO relatively easily and using not very complex/unfindable chemicals?


    Pierre

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  3. #2  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    You can isolate Na by using a not too complex material to come by, table salt.

    It would be best to review electrolysis on your own and know that breathing Chlorine is a very uncomfortable and toxic experience.

    Also, keep the sodium away from water unless you want problems.


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  4. #3 Experiments 
    Forum Bachelors Degree The P-manator's Avatar
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    Thanks.

    I found out that NaO is not an independant compund so I have given up there. However, I have something interesting that I fell upon in my research. These are theoretical experiments and I am wondering if they would work (under normal conditions).

    With NaCO3 I tried to find some answers:

    NaCO3 + H2SO4 --> NaHSO4 + HCO3- (What happens to the HCO3 anion?)

    NaCO3 + HCl --> NaOH + Cl + CO2 (I am not at all sure about this one. I had to re-do it a couple of times and I still don't know.)

    NaCO3 + H2O2 --> NaCO + H2O (This one I am pleased with, but I'm probably not right.)

    Then with CuSO4 I wanted to see if I could isolate the Cu:

    CuSO4 + H2SO4--> CuO2 + S2O4 + H2O2 (A lot of guessing work. Not at all sure on this one.)

    CuSO4 + 2HCl --> CuCl2 + H2SO4 (This one took a lot of re-doing as well and I have no clue about it.)

    CuSO4 + H2O2 --> Cu + H2SO6 (This one I think I might have found my goal, but once again it's scrappy.)
    Pierre

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  5. #4  
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    Na: electrolysis of brine (membrane cell)

    NaO: do you mean NaO2, Na2O, or Na2O3?
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  6. #5  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    P-Manator, I don't really have time to address your reactions but there are many many problems, and I didn't see one that would proceed as you are expecting. Please don't do these experiments by yourself, and if you do please be sure to wear eye protection and keep your face away from the containers, paying mind not to breath fumes.

    You'd be well served by attending an advanced inorganic chemistry course.

    Good luck.
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