Notices
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Mustard gas

  1. #1 Mustard gas 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    53
    Hello, before I ask my question, I will like to say that I have made a conscious effort to try and find the answer to this question through search engines for 1 hour, before conceding that there is no answer online.

    I wish to discuss the 2 physical properties of mustard gas (1,5-dichloro-3-thiapentane) that seems to contradict each other

    First mustard gas appears to have a relatively high b.p. (for a covalent compound) of 217 degree celsius. The reasoning I came up with is that due to shape of molecule and polar bond between Cl and C, the molecules has a net dipole and experiences dipole-dipole forces.

    However, here is the paradox, Mustard gas is extreamly insoluble in water and is soluble in fats (making it dangerous). Why is this so? Isn't polar molecues likely to dissolve in water? Especially with the presence of chlorine, the molecule can undergo hydrogen bonding with water right?

    Thank you in advance for hearing my question.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,893
    The high boiling point is mostly caused by the molecule's high mass. Heavier molecules will usually have higher boiling points than lighter molecules, and mustard gas is pretty heavy. C12H26 is completely non-polar, but has about the same boiling point because it has about the same mass.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    53
    I see, thank you very much.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •