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Thread: Elements

  1. #1 Elements 
    Forum Freshman TheWonderer's Avatar
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    The question that i want to ask here is:
    1. Are the qualities or attributes of all known elements known?
    2. Some elements are not found in nature but are lab created. How are they created?

    thx


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  3. #2  
    Forum Freshman Samuel P's Avatar
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    I'm not sure about the first one, but some elements are so unstable they only exist momentarily, meaning that not all their attributes can be configured.

    I think what they do is smash atoms together at half the speed of light, increasing there mass and therefore changed there properties and creating a new element. A new element is created because elements are defined by there proton and neutron number. As I've said though, they only exist momentarily!

    I'm not very knowledgeable about it all really thought


    Here's a little bit of information that I just found ^_^!

    http://www.hps.org/publicinformation/ate/q4086.html


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  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman TheWonderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel P
    I'm not sure about the first one, but some elements are so unstable they only exist momentarily, meaning that not all their attributes can be configured.

    I think what they do is smash atoms together at half the speed of light, increasing there mass and therefore changed there properties and creating a new element. A new element is created because elements are defined by there proton and neutron number. As I've said though, they only exist momentarily!

    I'm not very knowledgeable about it all really thought


    Here's a little bit of information that I just found ^_^!

    http://www.hps.org/publicinformation/ate/q4086.html
    well thanx for ur reply.. i now have idea about the forming of the elements. but as far as i know smashing of atoms together at half the speed of light is not for forming new elements but its for researching particles at CERN.
    Thx again
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  5. #4  
    Forum Freshman Samuel P's Avatar
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    Well it can form new elements, as it increases the mass of one element by combining it with another.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWonderer
    1. Are the qualities or attributes of all known elements known?
    Most of the attributes of the elements on the Periodic Table are known (if you mean boiling point, Heat of Fusion, melting point, lattice structure, etc.)

    However, attributes of some trans-uranium elements such as Ununpentium, Ununtrium, etc. are completely unknown for a simple reason: they decay far too quickly to be examined and only a few atoms of these elements are produced at a time. This makes the sample that we have far too small to analyze.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheWonderer
    2. Some elements are not found in nature but are lab created. How are they created?
    As Samuel P. said: by taking sample of atoms at both ends of a particle accelerator and colliding the atoms together at near the speed of light.
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  7. #6 Attributes 
    Forum Freshman TheWonderer's Avatar
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    Well thx reaper. but as far as i know the mass increases as the speed increases so how do they manage to collide atoms at nearly the speed of light?
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  8. #7 Re: Attributes 
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWonderer
    but as far as i know the mass increases as the speed increases so how do they manage to collide atoms at nearly the speed of light?
    With a lot of energy. Essentially, the closer you get to the speed of light, the more of the energy you put in is turned into mass, so less of the energy is used to increase the speed. As you appraoch the speed of light, so much of the energy is turned into mass that there is no change in speed.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman Samuel P's Avatar
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    I did not know that turtle. Thanks!
    I might enquire about it in the physics sub-forum. ^_^
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  10. #9  
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    I'd heard there is a lab-created element which is not a transuranic ...
    element number 43 - technetium ...

    I went and found some info on it by clicking on the symbol [Tc] of this periodic table:

    http://chemistry.about.com/library/blperiodictable.htm

    Technetium (Masurium)

    Atomic Number: 43

    Symbol: Tc

    Atomic Weight: 98.9072

    Discovery: Carlo Perrier, Emilio Segre 1937 (Italy) found it in a sample of molybdenum that had been bombarded with neutrons; erroneously reported Noddack, Tacke, Berg 1924 as Masurium.

    Electron Configuration: [Kr] 5s2 4d5

    Word Origin: Greek technikos: an art or technetos: artificial; this was the first element made artificially.

    Isotopes: Twenty-one isotopes of technetium are known, [etc]

    Properties: Technetium is a silvery-gray metal [etc]

    Uses: Technetium-99 is used in many medical radioactive isotope tests. [etc]

    Element Classification: Transition Metal

    Density (g/cc): 11.5

    Melting Point (K): 2445

    Boiling Point (K): 5150

    Appearance: silvery-gray metal

    Atomic Radius (pm): 136

    Covalent Radius (pm): 127

    Ionic Radius: 56 (+7e)

    Atomic Volume (cc/mol): 8.5

    Specific Heat (@20C J/g mol): 0.243

    Fusion Heat (kJ/mol): 23.8

    Evaporation Heat (kJ/mol): 585

    Pauling Negativity Number: 1.9

    First Ionizing Energy (kJ/mol): 702.2

    Oxidation States: 7

    Lattice Structure: Hexagonal

    Lattice Constant (): 2.740

    Lattice C/A Ratio: 1.604

    References: Los Alamos National Laboratory (2001), Crescent Chemical Company (2001), Lange's Handbook of Chemistry (1952), CRC Handbook of Chemistry & Physics (18th Ed.)
    The periodic table itself was just the first link (below the sub-index links) on:

    http://chemistry.about.com/od/period...e_Elements.htm

    - which was just the first link on Google [Search: physical and chemical properties periodic table] ...

    There does seem to be plenty of information available regarding the properties of the known elements (and their isotopes) ...

    the newly-discovered (and those still only theorised) super-heavies?
    well, if we knew everything, we'd be bored already ...
    but some properties can be (have been) assumed by extending trends based on their position on the periodic table ...
    Nature abhors perfection; cats abhor a vacuum.

    "I don't know; I'm making it up as I go ..." Dr H Jones (Jr).
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  11. #10  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel P
    I did not know that turtle. Thanks!
    I might enquire about it in the physics sub-forum. ^_^
    I would advise you to; the way I explained it is just how I understand it (from what I've picked up in a few conversations), and is probably wrong in some way, or inaccurate at least.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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