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Thread: Heat Absorbing Materials

  1. #1 Heat Absorbing Materials 
    Forum Bachelors Degree The P-manator's Avatar
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    Are there materials that can absorb/trap heat efficiently and accumulate that heat?


    Pierre

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  3. #2  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    Yes. Anything that does not conduct electricity also does not conduct heat. So nonconductors, insulators, will help you trap heat, as long as you find a method to circumvent the insulator when moving the heat to the trap. None of these are perfect though.


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  4. #3  
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    What are cheap examples of such materials?
    Pierre

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  5. #4  
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    Styrofoam. Any type of home insulation. A double paned window (because air is a poor conductor and a thin layer between the panes is used to insulate). Plastic in some cases. Rubber in other cases.
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  6. #5  
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    How good is plastic? How good is rubber?
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  7. #6  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    Really, it's in how well you use it, but here you go. This will give you an idea, and you want the low end of the scale.

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...les/thrcn.html


    I realize that plastic and rubber aren't on there, probably because they are so varied. I do know of plastics that have been engineered to actually conduct heat and electricity, but your average milkjug or newspaper wrapper is an insulator. So is rubber, which I would guess is a better insulator than plastic, however I have no data to back that up.

    I would highly suggest taking a basic physics course.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Bachelors Degree The P-manator's Avatar
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    You say the more heat it conducts the better?
    Pierre

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  9. #8  
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    "Myself"

    Really, it's in how well you use it, but here you go. This will give you an idea, and you want the low end of the scale.
    No. The less heat it conducts the better. The low end of the scale is what you want. The bottom of the chart. I was hoping it would give you a frame of reference.
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  10. #9 Re: Heat Absorbing Materials 
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    Quote Originally Posted by The P-manator
    Are there materials that can absorb/trap heat efficiently and accumulate that heat?
    Water is great for absorbing and accumulating heat. That's why people use it for cooling system so often. Water in a styrofoam container would probably work about as well as any more exotic materials.

    It takes about 15.8 kJ of energy to raise the temperature of a gallon of water by just 1 degree. In comparison, a stick of dynamite holds about 2,000 kJ of energy. So 10 gallons of water could absorb all the energy in a stick of dynamite and only rise about 13 degrees in temperature! Or, to look at it another way, a 200 kJ laptop battery will power a computer for a few hours. So you could power a computer for several hours with the heat from a gallon of water and the water temperature would only go down about 10-15 degrees. If you had 100 gallons of boiling water you could power a 100 watt lightbulb for over 350 hours with the energy released as it cooled back to room temperature.

    That's pretty good energy storage!
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  11. #10 Solar water heater 
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    If I was to use aluminum tube encased in plexiglass as a solar water heater, would that work, or is there a better way?
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  12. #11 Re: Solar water heater 
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    Quote Originally Posted by evilsorcerer1
    If I was to use aluminum tube encased in plexiglass as a solar water heater, would that work, or is there a better way?
    Most certainly you are an evil sorcerer. Only an evil sorcerer would practice necromancy on such a long dead thread. Check the date on the last post before your's. Gee, more than five year's ago.

    But hey, I Googled "Solar Water Heater" for you and came up with this; http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects...er_heating.htm.
    Have fun!
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  13. #12 Re: Heat Absorbing Materials 
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    what is the best material for absorbing heat for batteries
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  14. #13  
    Forum Sophomore ReMakeIt's Avatar
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    Depends on what you are doing with the heat...what is the purpose of absorbing?

    Are you trying to keep a material from melting?
    Are you trying to use the heat to do work?
    Make electricity?


    Other questions:
    What is the size of the apparatus?
    What is your budget?
    What is your temperature range?
    What is the time scale for a cycle?
    What chemicals are involved in your apparatus?

    All this should be known before selecting a material...
    The more you know about the parameters the better fit your material can be.
    sculptor likes this.
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  15. #14  
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    What material would you suggest to absorb heat and re-emit the heat efficiently with good thermal properties.
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  16. #15  
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    heat absorbing
    low tech = thermal mass = brick, stone, concrete, rocks, water, etc
    high tech = phase change materials
    and combinations thereof

    Like ReMakeIt said, Pierre:
    It really depends on how high a temperature, it's source, and what you want it to do.
    Last edited by sculptor; May 21st, 2013 at 04:00 PM.
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