Notices
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Liquid that holds heat

  1. #1 Liquid that holds heat 
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1
    Hi!

    Does anybody know of a material that can take in a big amount of heat enough to be used for heating other objects ( ex.: volcano rocks ) and be in liquid state ?

    Thanks in advance for any answer!


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    131
    Are u looking for a pure substance or something perhaps insulated in some way or some combination of things that together would stay as a liquid and retain heat

    by that I mean would it have to be a pure substance(no mixture of things)


    Just here to Learn =)

    Not Thinking is a sign of laziness, everyone has to make a choice at some point in their lives, either they reach a degree of non thinking where being stupid is just easier or they start thinking and enjoy the life they have now
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,255
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Ph.D. Leszek Luchowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Gliwice, Poland
    Posts
    807
    Are you thinking about something like this?
    Leszek. Pronounced [LEH-sheck]. The wondering Slav.
    History teaches us that we don't learn from history.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,255
    Quote Originally Posted by drowsy turtle
    My mistake, I skimmed over the first post and missed the part about liquid state.

    I'd certainly go for a metal, though.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,590
    To melt rocks you would need to get to 2000F or so, and would need a furnace lined with refractory bricks with a gas or oil burner. Heat transfer liquids exist that can go up to say 800F, but as far as I know there are none that can go up to 2000F.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,255
    Depends on the type of rock.

    Rocks with a high silica content (acidic/silicic rocks) melt at much lower temperatures; of around 600-700 C. Mafic/Basic rocks melt at around 1000-1200 C.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,590
    Quote Originally Posted by drowsy turtle
    Depends on the type of rock.

    Rocks with a high silica content (acidic/silicic rocks) melt at much lower temperatures; of around 600-700 C. Mafic/Basic rocks melt at around 1000-1200 C.
    Thanks. I didn't realize there were rocks with such low melting point. (I had to check, naturally. Not that I doubted you. )

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu.../meltrock.html
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    951
    The amount of heat stored depends on the heat capacity.
    If you want a high heat fluid, gallium has the widest liquidus range of any metal.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10 Re: Liquid that holds heat 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    49
    Quote Originally Posted by justnelly13
    Hi!

    Does anybody know of a material that can take in a big amount of heat enough to be used for heating other objects ( ex.: volcano rocks ) and be in liquid state ?

    Thanks in advance for any answer!
    Hello,

    Ethylene glycol and some liquid silicone compounds come to mind...
    there are plenty of thermal liquids out there...
    Consult a pchem or engineering book for a more complete list..

    see link: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/th...ds-d_1260.html

    and

    see link: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ie50540a047

    and

    see link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...0b63f331a633ba

    you'll need access to SciFinder or your University's online journals to access this information... The may also have a hard copy in the University's chemistry and/or physics library..

    hope this helps..
    Good luck. : )
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    951
    More aptly , whats the application?
    The whole question would make more sense.
    It's kind of like asking what is a hrd substance , I want to to cut smething.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Senior Booms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    The perceptual schematic known as earth
    Posts
    361
    Your question is very vague, details as to what you need to know for would help


    the question relates to Thermal Mass (heat capacity) and high Heat capacity is based mostly on density


    So to answer your question you would want A very Dense substance, the purer it is the better, So some form of Metal would hold the most heat, Iron would be a good one although I would Reccomend Scheelite as the best, it's used to create mock diamonds and contains wolfram (tungsten) if you could successfully melt it, it could easily melt rocks for you
    It's not how many questions you ask, but the answers you get - Booms

    This is the Acadamy of Science! we don't need to 'prove' anything!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    951
    LOL!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Senior Booms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    The perceptual schematic known as earth
    Posts
    361
    Quote Originally Posted by Leszek Luchowski
    Are you thinking about something like this?


    HAHAHAHAHAH 'stevenson' stole that idea from Artemis Fowl!
    It's not how many questions you ask, but the answers you get - Booms

    This is the Acadamy of Science! we don't need to 'prove' anything!
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •