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Thread: volume of gases

  1. #1 volume of gases 
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    Propane can be used as an alternative fuel to petrol.
    Propane burns according to the following equation.
    C3H8 + 5O2 → 3CO2 + 4H2O
    Calculate the mass and volume, at room temperature and pressure, of carbon dioxide
    produced by the complete combustion of 1.0 kg of propane.
    Show your working.
    [Ar : C, 12; H,1; O,16.]
    [At room temperature and pressure 1 mole of any gas has a volume of 24 dm3.]


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  3. #2  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
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    I won't do your homework for you.

    Show us what you've done so far, and I'll help you work it out for yourself


    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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  4. #3 Re: volume of gases 
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    Quote Originally Posted by STEPHANkIM5
    Propane can be used as an alternative fuel to petrol.
    Propane burns according to the following equation.
    C3H8 + 5O2 → 3CO2 + 4H2O
    Calculate the mass and volume, at room temperature and pressure, of carbon dioxide
    produced by the complete combustion of 1.0 kg of propane.
    Show your working.
    [Ar : C, 12; H,1; O,16.]
    [At room temperature and pressure 1 mole of any gas has a volume of 24 dm3.]
    Some important things to note:

    The relationship between pressure and temperature at constant volume can be explained by the constant gas law...

    pV = nRT therefore P is proportional to T and Pi/Ti = Pf/Tf
    The final pressure can therefore be explained by...
    Pf = PiTf/Ti


    According to the perfect gas law you can compute the amount of gas from pressure, and temperature and volume. Once this has been calculated the
    mass of the gas can be calculated from the amount and the molecular mass:

    Utilizing pV = nRT

    so with simple algebra n = pV/RT

    Now ask yourself how many moles of carbon dioxide do your have?
    Can you convert from moles to grams? - if not here is a good example and this is an important formula to remember - http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you...moles_to_grams

    now you have another hint given to you in this problem: you are told that you have complete combustion.. i.e. the maximum yield attainable by the stoichiometry was reached...

    hope this helps..
    good luck.
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