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Thread: Use of chlorinating agents in solvent extraction

  1. #1 Use of chlorinating agents in solvent extraction 
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    Hey everybody, signed up to ask a question, answer to which i have forgotten.

    In the solvent extraction of urinary organic acids, one typical procedure is to use an acid, to ensure that less of your acid exist in the dissociated form form and better recoveries from the organic phase used.

    However after adding acids, in most papers i see there is a typical addition of either a chlorinating agent, of sulphates. So if they used HCL, a usual step is to add HCL acid, a next step will be to osaturate the mixture with sodium chloride, or say if sulphuric acid is used they saturate the mixture with say sodium sulphate

    My Question is what is the reason for the NaCl?

    Thanks


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  3. #2 ...the salting out effect 
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    A friend just gave me another paper in which i think is the answer to my previous question. And i post here for reference and discussion

    Apparantely the addition of NaCL is for the salting out effect where the addition of salt reduces the availability of water molecules to act as solvent for the non electrolyte.


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  4. #3  
    Moderator Moderator AlexP's Avatar
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    don't know a lot about this, but that does make sense.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
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