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Thread: CO2 Scrubbers

  1. #1 CO2 Scrubbers 
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    Hi. I'm not educated when it comes to Chemistry so please don't bash me for anything I ask here no matter how dumb it may sound. :wink:

    I was wondering how many different ways CO2 can be removed from an enclosed occupied space and the length of time they would scrub the CO2 before they would have to be replaced.

    I'm trying to figure out the best way to build one for a Personal 1-2 Man Submersible/Submarine that I have been thinking about building.

    Also safety is a big issue so please explain the safest way to handle the chemicals when making the scrubber and replacing them when needed.

    I was also wondering if the CO2 scrubbers that are used for manned space missions the same as the navy uses in nuclear subs or are they different?


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  3. #2  
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    I believe the simplest, cheapest type of CO2 scrubbers uses calcium hydroxide or some other hydroxide salt. It reacts with CO2 to make carbonate and water. I believe these are what they use on most space missions. I don't know how nuclear subs do it.


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  4. #3  
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    Thx I searched calcium hydroxide and it does remove CO2 but as i read it also mentioned Sodium Hydroxide which led me to this link and answered the question about space missions and submarines quite well.

    http://www.answers.com/topic/sodium-....22scrubber.22

    Atmospheric CO2 "scrubber"
    Within contained atmospheres containing animal life (such as the International Space Station with its astronauts or within a submerged submarine with its crew) normal respiration by the occupants generates carbon dioxide.[11][12] This can rise to high enough concentration to create a toxic atmosphere and so must be restrained to non-toxic levels.[13] The property of sodium hydroxide to absorb and convert carbon dioxide has been noted above as an inconvenience, but is in this case applied as a solution to this problem. The contained atmosphere is circulated through a contacting medium containing either dry hydroxide or which is washed with a water solution of the substance. One example is treating calcium hydroxide with sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide to form Soda lime.
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