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Thread: Nitric acid

  1. #1 Nitric acid 
    Forum Masters Degree thyristor's Avatar
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    Hi!
    I have a question to which I have been trying to find an asnwer for quite a long time, but I can't find any. I did some research at Google, but I couldn't find any satisfactory answer. Maybe it's just that I don't quite understand what they mean.
    Anyway, what I would like to know is why nitric acid can corrode copper, while sulphuric acid and hydrocloric acid can't. I too realize it must have got something to do with the , just like it says on wikipedia. The only thing is, I don't know how.
    I'd be grateful for a reply.


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  3. #2  
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    Were did you get that sulfuric acid doesn't corrode copper where do you think copper sulphate comes from?True HCl leaves pure copper alone but is hell on the oxide. another rule of thumg is that almost ALL metal nitrates are soluble in H20hence the greater activety of HN03.


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  4. #3 Re: Nitric acid 
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    Quote Originally Posted by thyristor
    Hi!
    I have a question to which I have been trying to find an asnwer for quite a long time, but I can't find any. I did some research at Google, but I couldn't find any satisfactory answer. Maybe it's just that I don't quite understand what they mean.
    Anyway, what I would like to know is why nitric acid can corrode copper, while sulphuric acid and hydrocloric acid can't. I too realize it must have got something to do with the , just like it says on wikipedia. The only thing is, I don't know how.
    I'd be grateful for a reply.
    They use a ferric chloride solution to etch brass and copper. You can strengthen it with either more hydrochloric acid, or by the addition of nitric acid. By adding nitric acid, you drop out some of the metals, into a solid metallic oxide, and strengthen the solution, or bring it back to strength.


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    William McCormick
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    There is another aspect, all these acids available today are solutions of the acid itself. The acid is often much stronger or even a solid in pure form. By applying this solution of the acid to a metal, you create a corrosive environment with plenty of oxygen from the water to corrode the metal.

    This takes place with all metals exposed to water. The acid creates electricity, and a corrosive environment that can setup a chemical factory at the site of the contamination.

    Any acid or corrosive can cause this effect. Even vats that held and heated acids for years. Often disintegrate out in the weather in a months time. Water is mean.


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    William McCormick
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  6. #5  
    Forum Masters Degree thyristor's Avatar
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    Ok, thanska for your replies.
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