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Thread: What chemical would dissolve in air, but not liquid?

  1. #1 What chemical would dissolve in air, but not liquid? 
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    I'm not sure if this is in the right forum so apologies if it isn't.

    I'm looking for two things. Firstly, some form of edible chemical or material treated with a chemical that would either turn translucent/transparent or break up when exposed to air, but be visible and cohesive when in an acidic liquid (i.e. fruit juice).

    Secondly, I'm looking for something that does the opposite of the above. Something that is translucent/transparent in liquid, but when exposed to air becomes visible. If these two things happen to be the same chemical, that would be great, but it's just as useful if they happen to be two separate things.

    The chemical and/or material must be safe for the human body as it would be in contact with juice that people would be drinking, although the chemical/material itself would not be the focus of what people were consuming.

    I'm in no way knowledgeable about chemistry so a simple explanation would be very much appreciated! Additionally, if you know of somewhere where I could read up further on such a chemical/material that would be great, as it'd back up my research.

    Many thanks for your help.
    Neil Martin


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  3. #2  
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    YOU are Nuts!


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  4. #3  
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    I can see where you're coming from, but I know of no such chemicals. My though is to find an unreactive gas that dissolves in water and work from it that way; by playing with its composition it may be possible to make it so it is coloured in air but not water, and vice versa.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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    Thanks for your advice, turtle. Gas sounds like an interesting idea. However, the chemical/gas would need to form specific visual messages (e.g. typography) and so I don't think a gas would be suitable. But thank you anyway because even if it doesn't work, it's still valuable research.
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  6. #5  
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    Mind me asking what exactly its for?
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  7. #6 Re: What chemical would dissolve in air, but not liquid? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anagoge
    I'm not sure if this is in the right forum so apologies if it isn't.

    I'm looking for two things. Firstly, some form of edible chemical or material treated with a chemical that would either turn translucent/transparent or break up when exposed to air, but be visible and cohesive when in an acidic liquid (i.e. fruit juice).

    Secondly, I'm looking for something that does the opposite of the above. Something that is translucent/transparent in liquid, but when exposed to air becomes visible. If these two things happen to be the same chemical, that would be great, but it's just as useful if they happen to be two separate things.

    The chemical and/or material must be safe for the human body as it would be in contact with juice that people would be drinking, although the chemical/material itself would not be the focus of what people were consuming.

    I'm in no way knowledgeable about chemistry so a simple explanation would be very much appreciated! Additionally, if you know of somewhere where I could read up further on such a chemical/material that would be great, as it'd back up my research.

    Many thanks for your help.
    Neil Martin

    There are a few inks that when exposed to air turn color. I believe some of them are edible.

    Here is something that might give you some ideas.

    http://www.funsci.com/fun3_en/acids/acids.htm#6


    http://www.funsci.com/fun3_en/acids/acids.htm#13

    There are a few invisible chemicals they put in spoof chewing gum that turns your mouth black.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  8. #7  
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    Look there are no chemicals that actually "dissolve" in air if
    you mean like in a fluid or even a solid. They are called gas mixtures! The END.
    Gases mix with each other no matter what. As above what the heck are you trying to do??
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney
    Look there are no chemicals that actually "dissolve" in air if
    you mean like in a fluid or even a solid. They are called gas mixtures! The END.
    Gases mix with each other no matter what. As above what the heck are you trying to do??
    Dry Ice kind of dissipates into the atmosphere from a solid.

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    William McCormick
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    Sublimes is the term you are looking for. still that is a gas into gas mixture and it never is visible as the OP requests.
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    Sublimation followed by diffusion, yes.

    Solvents are generally polar, but the majority of air molecules are elements, with no bond polarity. I'm not sure if polar gases can become solvents, but then, generally polar molecules have lower boiling points due to PD-PD forces from the bond polarity.

    I wonder though... does water vapour act as a solvent despite being in gas form?
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  12. #11  
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    get real, liquids solvate ( or not) depending on the species present other liquids ,solids, or gases . GASES MIX no matter what thus they form mixtures, not solutions.
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  13. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney
    Sublimes is the term you are looking for. still that is a gas into gas mixture and it never is visible as the OP requests.
    With a little water vapor it is visible. And I believe you might even get some dye to get picked up in the CO2 and water vapor. I believe you could find a dye that could change color, or become invisible as the CO2 drops the water. Or the water better disperses.

    I do not know if they use dye or just lighting effects on stage. I will look into that. Someone was telling me that they pump liquid CO2 and water vapor to make all that rolling ground smoke on stage.

    I know they use Lead acetate encapsulated water beads to create the high pressure heated fog that rises. But for the rolling ground smoke I believe they use the liquid CO2 and water vapor.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  14. #13  
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    How long is Chemboy going to let the Wild Willy show go on? Just send his crap straight to trash can and be done with it. Furthermore look a all the space wasted on this loon, it would be better if forum members just ignored his drivel and quit trying to reason with a stump. I sent a PM to Chemboy awhile back with no reply so I'm taking it to the forum enough is enough. opinion is for politics and religion,science deals in facts.
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  15. #14  
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    There might lye a bit of confusion as to what is being said Ė where vapour is mentioned, am I right in saying vapour is a gas at a temp where the substance can still exist as a liquid (or solid) and is typically in equilibrium with the liquid state?

    The dye would is most likely diffusing into the gas/vapour more so than

    Just send his crap straight to trash can and be done with it
    From what I have read I can see some arguments which arenít backed up fully, some points which may need to be corrected (I am not the man to do this, as I havenít touched phys-chem in a while). But nothing to me would suggest (with a quick review of the rules) William doing any damage bar perhaps bending rules, 4(a/e).

    Granted Iím only sort of sticking my nose in slightly Ė but in the nature of keeping the peace slightly, just adding my two cents.

    4(a) Don't reply to your own post if you forget to add something, i.e., post two consecutive posts. Instead, edit the initial message. If you need time to think, don't post a "Let me think.." message. Think, than post your message.
    4(e) Before replying, please ask yourself the following question: "Does my reply offer any significant advice or help contribute to the conversation in any fashion?" If not, do not post it as it will be considered spam.
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  16. #15  
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    Wow, thank you for the really helpful advice. It's really appreciated. I had expected to return to this post (For purposes of printing it out for my research) to find no further replies but it's great to see more information has been added. Thank you again.
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