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Thread: Ether properties?

  1. #1 Ether properties? 
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    Ether properties?

    Does anyone know about its endothermic and exothermic reactions?

    I'm kind of new here. So hi.


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    Which ether would that be?


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    Well the Gas.
    Sorry I don't what different ether's there is.
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    I'm assuming you mean diethyl ether and it's not a gas. It's a low-boiling point liquid.
    What do you mean exactly by exothermic and endothermic reactions? If you want an exothermic reaction, well it's flammable, very flammable!!
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  6. #5  
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    What about its endothermic properties. I'm looking at cooling?
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlweb
    What about its endothermic properties. I'm looking at cooling?
    It can be used as a refrigerant, but this isn't a reaction. It makes use of thermodynamic properties, not chemical properties.
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    How can it be used as refrigerant?
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    Look up "Joule-Thompson effect".
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    Isn't ether also the homologous series containing R-O-R sequences? There are a wide range of ethers therefore.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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    Quote Originally Posted by drowsy turtle
    Isn't ether also the homologous series containing R-O-R sequences? There are a wide range of ethers therefore.
    I think that's right, although It's ages since I did organic chemistry. I don't know which ether was used as a refrigerant. It isn't used for that today, but was in the early days of refrigeration.
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    R-O-R is correct, CH3-O-CH3 is dimethyl ether, the simplest and lowest boiling there are fluoroethers with BPs in the 500F range , it all goes up from here.Not really known as a refrigerant. the lower MW ethers do have reasonably low BPs and cool off stuff by evaporation. Freons are a better bet for refrigerant use.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney
    R-O-R is correct, CH3-O-CH3 is dimethyl ether, the simplest and lowest boiling
    I learned it as methoxyl-methane, I think.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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    What ever, Methyloxyl group is -OCH3, kinda like calling water Hydrogen hydroxide, dihydrogen oxide, oxygen dihydride , hydroxyl hydrogen........ getting dizzy yet?
    Has nothing to do with the original ???
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney
    What ever, Methyloxyl group is -OCH3, kinda like calling water Hydrogen hydroxide, dihydrogen oxide, oxygen dihydride , hydroxyl hydrogen........ getting dizzy yet?
    Has nothing to do with the original ???
    Agreed, we diverged.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
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    This is ether basically. Link below.

    I am not sure about this because I have never manufactured it. However I believe it has no odor. When used as an ethereal ether, it is actually a mix of methyl ether and an essential oil, so you can tell the room is reaching a fuel air mix that will detonate a city block.

    It is these little things they omit in day to day life that often kill chemists and engineers. You can make ether a couple different ways. Sometimes by accident. If that is the case, you may not be able to smell it or identify it by its smell.

    Methyl ether is actually a gas, but essential oils help keep it contained as a volatile liquid. The problem with ether is that it contains oxygen. So a little more oxygen and it can become very unstable. Where acetones require a large amount of oxygen to become unstable.

    In the presence of peroxides almost any ether can detonate upon heating. Containers coated in zinc and cadmium often contain high amounts of oxygen, in the metal containers surface. After long storage the ether can absorb this oxygen, form peroxides and detonate. That is why they have HAZMAT come and remove old drums of chemicals.

    While working for the EPA I suggested a call to the bomb squad when we came across old cans of ethyl ether, that had formed peroxides inside. Even the bomb squad did not know it was possible, until they read our material on it.




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    William McCormick
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    I was just reading that the addition of sodium sulfite will remove peroxides from ethers.

    And it stated that by using acidified sodium or potassium iodide solutions, in mixture with a sample of the suspected un- pure ether, will turn the substance brown indicating peroxides are present.


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    You can use ether, but I would not recommend it as a refrigerant. Because it can form peroxides. Today there are not enough skilled refrigeration experts around that could successfully assure that no oxygen contamination had taken place.

    You could also use ammonia however the same problem exists, except that you have to watch for aromatic hydrocarbon contamination.

    You can just create a partial vacuum over these substances and they will evaporate and leave a puddle of subzero fluid that can be used to cool. Then you can compress the gas and use a small condenser, with high pressure, or use a very large condenser with reduced pressures. To remove the heat.

    Imagine a propane powered ammonia refrigeration system, being damaged by accident. Leaking ammonia and propane into a room. With a subsequent spark.

    Even today with the need to cut costs, I see more and more poor procedures being used in the refrigeration and air conditioning business. Myself not excluded. So that even some of the very forgiving substances are getting contaminated.

    Most people would not believe the small amount of contamination that can be introduced into a system, to cause it to run at extreme high pressures. Most often this causes a lack of cooling.

    We get there and know right away from the pressures what happened. After we check the system for other faults. Like a dirty condenser, or plugged liquid line, filter dryer. If you get ice after your high side filter dryer, it is probably clogged.

    Today we use about five or six standard Freons. The most common still today is R22, but that is slated to be phased out. With 410-A, for Air Conditioning units. And in some cases 404-A for ice machines and similar equipment.

    R-12 is all but gone. A container I believe costs over one thousand dollars to purchase. That was replaced with R-135. They have something called Hot Shot that replace R-12. It runs at slightly different pressures but is effective. I believe it might cause a little more strain on the compressors though.

    All of the above usually work under pressure. Meaning that in the evaporator, there is always a positive pressure caused by the pumping system. And a much higher then atmospheric pressure in the condenser. Or high side.

    With a 410-A system high side pressures of 325 psi, are considered low pressures even with no system duress.

    On a very hot day with inside temperatures near the evaporator coil of 90 plus degrees. R-22 would usually have a head pressure of around 275-295 psi, and evaporator or low side pressure of 75-85 psi. So the cooling is created with a 200 psi differential. Not really a vacuum.

    But a vacuum does work. You have to be able to contend with the problems of boiling off a liquid. And all the noise it creates.



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    William McCormick
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  19. #18  
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    LOL , did you get this out of one of your books found alonside the curb?
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    Can it be used in a pre-scrub operation for distillate of phlogiston?
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  21. #20  
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    Quote Originally Posted by octopass
    well it's flammable, very flammable!!
    Too right, I've never seen, nor do I plan to, an ether fire but I hear the speed at which it spreads is rather frighting.
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
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  22. #21  
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney
    LOL , did you get this out of one of your books found alonside the curb?
    Real life experience actually. I install and maintain, refrigeration equipment, and AC equipment. And satellite controlled energy management systems.


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    William McCormick
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  23. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    Can it be used in a pre-scrub operation for distillate of phlogiston?
    If you are not Greek, I would say that the basis of your science, having a strong influence, from the substance phlogiston, would explain your past posts in a new and interesting light.



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  25. #24  
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    I n a few words , Sir you are a FRIGG'EN idiot!
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  26. #25  
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    Hey Megabrain , do you have 500 grams of phlogiston you could spare? What's the per gram price these days?
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