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Thread: Insulating

  1. #1 Insulating 
    Forum Bachelors Degree The P-manator's Avatar
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    What's the insulating in houses made out of?


    Pierre

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  3. #2  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    There are many different types of insulation used in houses.

    As a general rule, anything that does not conduct heat/electricity is a good insulator.

    Styrofoam does the job well. Double pane windows have a very thin layer of air between the panes to insulate, and this works well because air is a poor conductor.


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  4. #3  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Is styrofoam not potentially highly flammable? I don't think it is permitted in the UK. Fibre glass wool would be common here, I think. On the other hand I live in a 150 year old house with as much insulation as the top of Yul Brynner's head, so what do I know.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    Ophiolite:
    Is styrofoam not potentially highly flammable?
    I wouldn't say flammable, though it definitely will melt. But, point taken, perhaps that was a bit of a bad example for a house (because it's still uncommon), though I have seen that recently styrofoam and other disposable coffee cups and shreaded up tires are being blown into walls and put in attics for insulation.

    If you're meaning to imply that styrofoam would be a bad insulator because it melts, it's actually a good insulator because you can't conduct and electric current with it.

    But seriously man, I'd get some insulation. It makes an amazing difference. My uncle's garage is well insulated with no heating or air and it's probably the most comfortable place I've ever been.
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  6. #5  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silkworm
    If you're meaning to imply that styrofoam would be a bad insulator because it melts, it's actually a good insulator because you can't conduct and electric current with it.
    No it is a good insulator, it was the possibel fire hazard I was concerned about. Even if you can add flame retarders to it, if it does go up I suspect it will release all kinds of nasty toxins.
    But seriously man, I'd get some insulation.
    Right after the re-wiring, the replumbing, and the new central heating system. Would you like to make a contribution? :wink:
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  7. #6  
    Forum Bachelors Degree The P-manator's Avatar
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    Thank you very much everybody.
    Pierre

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  8. #7  
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    styrofoam is falmable, no debate,

    fiber glass (not that i have ever tryed...)burns to form a glass like hard mass of, stuff...

    fiber glass is the best for roofs, but because of possible health problems , its not nice to inhale.

    as far as i know styrofoam is perfect, we had the stuff pumped into the wall cavity, and becasue its in the wall, im hopeing theres no fire hazard....

    styrofoam and air is the best becasue where theres no styrofoam.... theres air.

    double glazing is cool, keeps the wind out, since we got our new windows but also .. we cannot light our fireplace (real irish...) no draw...

    but in saying all that.. i still find my whole house cold, it dosen't seem to have made a differance,

    i cannot help but wonder, if you were asking , in relation to the fuel cell post, where some one suggested using an insulator. both those metioned (except perhaps the air cavity) wouldn't suffice due to possible high temps in the said fuel cell...?
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  9. #8  
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    The fuel cells for cars are relativily low-temperature.
    Pierre

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  10. #9  
    Forum Ph.D.
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    my bad
    Stumble on through life.
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