Notices
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Making a stock solution from non water soluble chemicals

  1. #1 Making a stock solution from non water soluble chemicals 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2
    Hello Science Forum

    I have been doing a lot of reading about plant tissue culture in preparation for 'having a go' myself. I have query relating to making up my stock solutions for napthalene acetic acid and benzylamine purine. I understand both of these are not water soluble and best dissolved in an organic solvent. I read that alcohol and ammonia are some options. I am concerned that these solvents will interfere with the process so am hoping the following will work for me so that I may use the smallest amount of organic solvent possible.

    My question is, can i dissolve the small quantity of chemical in the bare minimum amount of solvent, then mix this into water to make a workable volume without it falling out of solution?

    I'd just do the experiment and see but I am paying a small fortune for them and hope to get this step right the first time

    Thankyou


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,256
    Hexane and cyclohexane are both good organic solvents. However, they are harmful to humans, and so probably are to cultured tissues as well.


    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    951
    Think you mean benzyladenine or benzylaminopurine a plant hormone.
    if its insoluble in water it will most likely precipitate out if diluted from an alcahol solution.
    napthalene and acetic acid are two separate compunds,you sure its not a napthenic acid or something else?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4 Re: Making a stock solution from non water soluble chemicals 
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,178
    Quote Originally Posted by backyardgardener
    Hello Science Forum

    I have been doing a lot of reading about plant tissue culture in preparation for 'having a go' myself. I have query relating to making up my stock solutions for napthalene acetic acid and benzylamine purine. I understand both of these are not water soluble and best dissolved in an organic solvent. I read that alcohol and ammonia are some options. I am concerned that these solvents will interfere with the process so am hoping the following will work for me so that I may use the smallest amount of organic solvent possible.

    My question is, can i dissolve the small quantity of chemical in the bare minimum amount of solvent, then mix this into water to make a workable volume without it falling out of solution?

    I'd just do the experiment and see but I am paying a small fortune for them and hope to get this step right the first time

    Thankyou
    I do not know about your experiment or its purpose. I wish I did.

    But what about formaldehyde. Or Xylene. I know they use Xylene for blood work, probably does not allow oxidation of the samples as they are being prepared on slides.

    They say at wiki that formaldehyde can turn to formic acid in the blood. I had never heard that.

    They use formaldehyde as you probably know to store cancer tumors and things like that for later study.

    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5 Re: Making a stock solution from non water soluble chemicals 
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,569
    Quote Originally Posted by William McCormick
    They use formaldehyde as you probably know to store cancer tumors and things like that for later study.
    But the OP wants to culture cells. Formaldehyde kills tissue and preserves its structure. You can't recover viable cells from formaldehyde.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Professor Zwirko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    55 N, 3 W
    Posts
    1,082
    This pdf may be of help. From what I've read, they are dissolved in acids or bases, depending, rather than organic solvents.

    For example, the pdf linked to above describes preparing a stock solution of NAA like so:
    Code:
    NAFTALENACETIC ACID (NAA)
    1 Stock solution of NAA 1,000 ppm
    Weigh 0.2 g of NAA and dissolve well with some NaOH 1N drops.
    2. Add 200 ml of distilled water.
    Keep it in a conveniently labeled vial at 0~O.
    One ml of stock solution (1,000 ppm) contains 1 mg of NAA.
    BAP is also described.


    Another site:

    Code:
    NAA
    
    1 mM stock solution  --> 9.31mg/50ml
    
    disolve in about 2.5 ml 95% etoh or 2.5 ml of 1M KOH or NaOH stir, heat
    gently and gradually add water to volume.  pH to 5.0
    
    
    BAP
    
    1 mM stock solution --> 11.25 mg/50ml
    Disolve in 2.5 ml of 0.5 M HCl, heat gently and make to volume.  Adjust pH
    to 5.0

    I was never very good at making solutions, so take what I say with a pinch of salt.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    2
    Thankyou everyone for your answers!

    William I am just trying to propagate plants using plant tissue culture. Nothing ground breaking, for now,

    Zwirko those PDF's are gold, just what i needed. I had hoped to avoid sodium hydroxide as I need a ph that will be somewhere between 5 and 5.8 but that's ok, I'll just adjust the pH.

    I have since found the NAA and BAP a lot cheaper, though not lab grade. I'll do the experiments and report back.

    Fizz you are quite correct on the actual chemical I meant to type regarding benzylaminopurine. With the napthalene acetic acid there seems to be about 20 synonyms, but i should have typed naphthalene.

    The 2 ingredients I referred to are correctly 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid C10H7CH2CO2H and 6-Benzylaminopurine C12H11N5

    Thankyou
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    945
    For future reference I believe it is possible to solvate aliphatic or other non water soluble compounds in mixtures of suitable solvent and water as you suggested, but the right ratio is required. Slightly dissolving it and pilling in water would not work, but say 60:40 solvent to water might.

    Simple tests can be done, altering the ratio to get a workable mixture. Work with what you can I guess
    Stumble on through life.
    Feel free to correct any false information, which unknown to me, may be included in my posts. (also - let this be a disclaimer)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •