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Thread: polar bonds

  1. #1 polar bonds 
    Forum Freshman almirza's Avatar
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    How we can know the most polar molecule depending on the difference in the electronigativity of the atoms which make that molecule????????


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  3. #2  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    What is a polar molecule?
    What is electronegativity?
    If you can answer these two questions, then the answer to your own question should become self evident.
    Does that help?


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  4. #3  
    Forum Senior silkworm's Avatar
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    The atom with the higher electronegativity is more negative because it's pulling electron density towards it.

    Ophiolite:

    What is electronegativity?
    I've thought about this a lot and it may just be a type of optical illusion based on size versus electron affinity. I don't think it has anything to do with actual pull in an of itself.

    But, I'm still just an undergrad. What do I know?
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  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silkworm
    But, I'm still just an undergrad. What do I know?
    Probably more than me: at the very least it will be fresher in your mind.
    I was trying to get almirza to think for his(her)self. This looked like a "Can you do my homework for me?" kind of question. Oh, well.

    The greater the difference in electronegativity between the participating atoms, the greater will be the tendency for the more electronegative atom to attract the electrons. (Actually I prefer your phrase electron density in this context.)
    The greater the extent of this shift in electron density from one atom to the other, the more polar the molecule. At the extreme case, where the electrons are pulled entirely to one of the atoms, we have ionic bonding, rather than covalent. There is probably a complete range between wholly co-valent, polar, to ionic. As is often the case man's habit of classifying things can create artificial barriers.
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