Notices
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: noble gases are they inert?

  1. #1 noble gases are they inert? 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    90
    i was brought up to believe that noble gases (group 8/0 elements) were inert but i have recently been told that they can form bonds with metals usually noble metals such as gold and platinum.
    how do noble gases bond if they are so stable?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,525
    1. You are right - they have extremely low reactivity.

    2. When we humans set our minds to it, and if it is possible, we eventually achieve it. See wiki on this.

    3. It would be a nice symmetry if the chemical bonding of noble gases was with the 'noble' metals, but that isn't really the case. Noble metals too are low in reactivity and again, like noble gases, need highly reactive substances to effect chemical change in them.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Sophomore Gods servant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    173
    i was also told that it was inert hence very low chanc eof it bonding with another element, are you sure that this is possible? example

    Nope -- it's called an inert gas. Any transient compound it may form falls apart quickly.

    From Wikipedia: "Helium is chemically unreactive under all normal conditions due to its valence of zero.[39] It is an electrical insulator unless ionized. As with the other noble gases, helium has metastable energy levels that allow it to remain ionized in an electrical discharge with a voltage below its ionization potential.[23] Helium can form unstable compounds, known as excimers, with tungsten, iodine, fluorine, sulfur and phosphorus when it is subjected to an electric glow discharge, through electron bombardment or is otherwise a plasma. HeNe, HgHe10, WHe2 and the molecular ions He2+, He22+, HeH+, and HeD+ have been created this way.[59] This technique has also allowed the production of the neutral molecule He2, which has a large number of band systems, and HgHe, which is apparently only held together by polarization forces.[34] Theoretically, other compounds may also be possible, such as helium fluorohydride (HHeF) which would be analogous to HArF, discovered in 2000.[60]"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helium#Compounds
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4 Noble gases 
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    951
    There are about a dozen known compounds of Xenon most are fluorides or oxides, Xe4Au does exist also. Kr is thouht to make a couple of fluorides . The rest are still pretty much inert. google Xe and Kr compounds.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    90
    thanks for the replies
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Sophomore Tharghana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    157
    The only truly inert Noble Gas is Neon, in which No Compounds have been made with, (thats if you dont count Ne+,) the Chain of reactivity goes as shown

    Ne He Ar Kr Xe Rn Uuo

    But compounds like HArF, and XePtF6 have been made

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenon_hexafluoroplatinate

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argon_hydrofluoride

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noble_gas_compounds
    www.periodicvideos.com - A Great Site

    "Well, good chemists shouldn't lick their fingers, anyways." - Martyn Poliakoff

    "You have lived to die, and your running out of life."

    "Once and a while, I go out of my way... to kill you... a little"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Senior Booms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    The perceptual schematic known as earth
    Posts
    361
    I was under the impression that noble element compounds don't occur naturally, however through the genius of science we have forced elements to combine


    Pure noble elements cannot make a compound, they have a full shell and have no 'reason' to react ions will react though
    It's not how many questions you ask, but the answers you get - Booms

    This is the Acadamy of Science! we don't need to 'prove' anything!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Sophomore Gods servant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    173
    true
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9 Re: noble gases are they inert? 
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,176
    Quote Originally Posted by rhysboi1991
    i was brought up to believe that noble gases (group 8/0 elements) were inert but i have recently been told that they can form bonds with metals usually noble metals such as gold and platinum.
    how do noble gases bond if they are so stable?

    I would be leery of someone telling me the noble gases form compounds. They may mix. They may have contaminants that are very hard to remove from the nobles. Those contaminants may hold other elements.

    Helium picks up compounds that contain oxygen. Like carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. That is why they use percentages of it over 92 percent, for humans to breath in deep sea subs.


    You can also destroy noble gases, breaking them down causing them to fission. Those created compounds may also form a bond with other chemicals.

    Universal Scientists did highly refined tests. And their conclusion shocked many Universal Scientists. There had been great debates and even threats of war or accusations of conspiracy, over scientists in different countries using identically purified chemicals. To repeat scientific experiments.

    The scientists were getting totally different results. The reason was the source and method of manufacture of purified chemicals. The contaminants in the two separate batches of 99.9 percent pure chemicals, created a totally different effect in the identical lab experiments. Even though they went through seemingly perfect purification methods in a lab.

    The release of this information, was perhaps to late. Because it caused a great distance between scientists of different nations. Bickering and low blows followed. The law makers loved it.

    Meanwhile the real news was overlooked. The contaminant was found to often be more important, then the substance itself, in creating effects in certain combinations of chemicals.

    And today in my opinion we have perhaps 65 percent of our chemicals labeled wrongly.

    Gold oxidizes so quickly that, it remains shiny. You see and touch the gold oxide. Gold may attract nobles that contain trace amounts of oxygen.

    The same is true of radio active isotopes. It is impossible to remove all the oxygen from them.


    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •