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Thread: Ionization Energy - Help!

  1. #1 Ionization Energy - Help! 
    Forum Sophomore Stranger's Avatar
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    It's about the hydrogen ionization energy... I know it's 1312 kJ/mole.

    However, Ionization Energy means "Energy required to remove the outermost electron from an atom in the gaseous state" right?

    If we apply this on Bohr's equation, we find that :

    (delta) E = RH (1/ni square - 1/nf square) Where RH is Rydberg's const. = 2.18 x 10^-18. As we remove the electron from a hydrogen atom in its ground state, ni = 1 and nf = infinity.

    Thus,

    (delta) E = 2.18 x 10^-18 (1/1 square - 1/infinity square)
    = 2.18 x 10 ^-18 J.

    Is it 1312 kJ or 2.18 x 10^-18 J???

    I know I must be wrong somewhere but I really can't find the mistake.

    Thanks for help.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor
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    The Bohr equation is for finding the ionization energy of a single atom. Try converting that to kj/mol.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Sophomore Stranger's Avatar
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    You are right.

    Thanks for help, it was really annoying me.
    Watch what thy eyes can't see... and live it.

    (T.B)
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