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Thread: Help with Iron Borate

  1. #1 Help with Iron Borate 
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    I am trying to find the melting point of Iron Borate and/or a ternary phase diagram for Iron, Borate and Oxygen. I have searched quite a bit, does anyone know this or have a suggestion where I might look?


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    Forum Bachelors Degree Demen Tolden's Avatar
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    I think its very likely that any college that offers the class General Chemistry would have a Chemists Handbook among their reference books in their library. You can find the answer to your melting point question in that book.


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  4. #3 Re: Help with Iron Borate 
    Forum Sophomore oceanwave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by khoffman1701
    I am trying to find the melting point of Iron Borate and/or a ternary phase diagram for Iron, Borate and Oxygen. I have searched quite a bit, does anyone know this or have a suggestion where I might look?
    What's a ternary phase mean and I think you mean: ....diagram for iron, boron and oxygen.
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  5. #4  
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    Yes, that's what I meant, I didn't even realize I had mistyped it, lol.

    And I've looked in books like the Handbook for Chemsitry and physics and Iron Borate is not in there.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Sophomore oceanwave's Avatar
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    ok, here's my take on the issue:

    (oh, here's the definition of TERNARY, courtesy of wiki!): Ternary complex refers to a complex containing three different molecules which are bound together......A ternary complex can also refer to a polymer formed by electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. From this, I think only the first part would be relevant.

    let's look at it from different points of argument; Boron first

    1) Boron as an element lies in the semi-metalloid range which classifies it under the 'same' group as silicon (i.e. semi-conductors). Thus, throwing it into its extremes of a non-metal: it readily oxidises rather then reduces as it is (quote wiki) the least electronegative of non-metals (which is actually saying alot). Throwing it as a metal would immediately toss out the iron borate formula (for obvious reasons) HOWEVER, as it is a semi-metal we cannot just put them into extreme groups for semi-metalloids behave differently and share characteristics of metals and non-metals BUT, the above example is just for theoretical argument's sake.

    2) Let's look at boron via the electronic configuration. One type of method views it as lacking 5 electrons for full octet stability. The other views it as a which means that it would need 2 electrons for semi stability or the above 5 for complete stability.

    3) can i edit this post later? im rushing other stuff now...hahahahah!
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