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  1. #1 highest demanded science job 
    Forum Bachelors Degree Demen Tolden's Avatar
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    Does anyone know what are currently the science fields in highest demand? I have a friend that was a chemist but couldn't get into a company with much job security so she switched to radiation and easily found a good job. I was thinking of maybe going into a science field myself, but rather than jump into something I wanted to get a good feel of what would be the demand for the training I would choose. I really have an expansive set of interests so there doesn't seem to be any aspect of science, math, or any subject that I am not very interested in learning.


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  3. #2  
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    I don't know the answer to the question but I think nuclear engineering might be a good field to get into right now. There are orders being placed for new nuclear power plants because of the concerns about greenhouse effect from burning fossil fuel.


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  4. #3  
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    A lot depends on location, lifestyle, desire to travel, etc.

    You live in a hot spot for medical research and innovations. Technical side of the industry such as engineering would open doors. Here in western Canada the demand is for folks in geology and geophysical sciences.... and there is also a hot demand for folks in environmental sciences. Candidates interview employers instead of the other way around.

    My advice is to stay away from generic sciences such as 'biology' or 'mathematics' or 'chenistry' unless you want to pursue an advanced degree (medicine and so on) or possiblly teach at the high school level. Those are excellent degrees but not in themselves always the best for careers. Whereas an engineer, geologist, etc. are professional designations in private and public industry.
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  5. #4  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    There is currently a very high demand for engineers of all disciplines. Engineering and construction companies are hiring new grads by the thousands. Chemical engineers are in especially high demand.

    Fields that might have long term stability include nuclear power, alternative fuels development (oil companies diversifying into biofuels, coal and gas conversion to liquids), and demilitarization (safe destruction of chemical and biological weapons under treaty obligations).

    I say “might” have long term stability because job security has never been associated with the engineering business. Historically it’s been boom and bust. I think this has changed though, and there should be plenty of work for the foreseeable future.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Bachelors Degree Demen Tolden's Avatar
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    I think I may be going to school for chemical engineering. My main reason for doing something like this is that I want to learn a lot of math and science and get paid for it. I could do nuclear engineering, and I guess either would be fine for me. I thought fluid dynamics looks pretty interesting. Is this more of a chemical thing? With my background in computer animation, ie working in 3d space, what would be the best engineering compliment?
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  7. #6  
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    I always like to through in *Nanotechnology*, when a person is interested in science and long term. For starters, there is more public and private money available in grants to schools or for qualified students scholarships. The University of Minnesota, no exception. Then virtually every industry sector has some R&D along these lines, to say nothing of the 200 companies that have formed directly linked in some area. Governments also, have shown interest, primarily for military purpose, including the US. IMO, its worth checking into and in connection with any primary personal interest.
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    If you're in Europe, the hottest science topic is bioinformatics. It focuses on biology (genetics) and computer science.
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  9. #8  
    Forum Masters Degree organic god's Avatar
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    I thought fluid dynamics looks pretty interesting
    fluid dynmaics is a huge part of the chemical engineering course.
    everything is mathematical.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by organic god
    I thought fluid dynamics looks pretty interesting
    fluid dynmaics is a huge part of the chemical engineering course.
    Yes, and Computational Fluid Dynamics - CFD - is a rapidly developing discipline that might be interesting to someone who likes both fluid dynamics and computer modeling.
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