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Thread: Bad Places to Work

  1. #1 Bad Places to Work 
    Forum Professor arKane's Avatar
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    I've often thought that unhappy employees make for bad customer relations and the following article seems to confirm that. I also think that when jobs are hard to come by, companies feel they can really put the screws to employees who really need the work and don't have to many options. I believe when a company losses a customer through bad service or product, they not only lose that customer but many other people that the unhappy customer will complain to. I know the article was limited to only a few companies, but I was somewhat surprised not to see banks and phone companies mentioned as I've had some very bad customer service from both of them.

    Anyway how do others on this forum feel about this topic and do you have any good stories that relate to this topic?

    Sears, Dish Network among the lowest ranked workplaces by employees - Bottom Line


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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    I've often thought that unhappy employees make for bad customer relations and the following article seems to confirm that. I also think that when jobs are hard to come by, companies feel they can really put the screws to employees who really need the work and don't have to many options. I believe when a company losses a customer through bad service or product, they not only lose that customer but many other people that the unhappy customer will complain to. I know the article was limited to only a few companies, but I was somewhat surprised not to see banks and phone companies mentioned as I've had some very bad customer service from both of them.

    Anyway how do others on this forum feel about this topic and do you have any good stories that relate to this topic?

    Sears, Dish Network among the lowest ranked workplaces by employees - Bottom Line


    Look at it from another employers point of veiw, you have employees go into what they know is not the best place to work and still doing a good job, these are the kind of staff they want to employ.

    My advice would for employees is always do the best job you can, forget about poor working conditions but look for another position with a different company as soon as possible. Being a poor employee because your unhappy will only mean that you find it far harder to get another job and increase the chances that you are will stuck with job you have, if indeed you manage to keep that one.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    Look at it from another employers point of veiw, you have employees go into what they know is not the best place to work and still doing a good job, these are the kind of staff they want to employ.

    My advice would for employees is always do the best job you can, forget about poor working conditions but look for another position with a different company as soon as possible. Being a poor employee because your unhappy will only mean that you find it far harder to get another job and increase the chances that you are will stuck with job you have, if indeed you manage to keep that one.
    You do make a good point, but that doesn't change the reality of the situation. I think most of us can relate to being stuck in a bad work situation. If you are an unhappy employee that deals directly with customers, it may simply be impossible to fake a good attitude for the customers. Anyway, if it was your company, would you want unhappy employees taking care of your customers?
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    Look at it from another employers point of veiw, you have employees go into what they know is not the best place to work and still doing a good job, these are the kind of staff they want to employ.

    My advice would for employees is always do the best job you can, forget about poor working conditions but look for another position with a different company as soon as possible. Being a poor employee because your unhappy will only mean that you find it far harder to get another job and increase the chances that you are will stuck with job you have, if indeed you manage to keep that one.
    You do make a good point, but that doesn't change the reality of the situation. I think most of us can relate to being stuck in a bad work situation. If you are an unhappy employee that deals directly with customers, it may simply be impossible to fake a good attitude for the customers. Anyway, if it was your company, would you want unhappy employees taking care of your customers?
    My employees are all very happy, at least thats what I'm told.
    That said though my employees are also my customers, so I have a vested interest in keeping them happy.

    I still stand by my original point though, if you are an employee if you want to be successful it is very important to be professional and maintain a possitive attitude regardless of the working enviroment and things going on around them. The most successful people are people who don't let things stand in their way or dictate their level of performance. As I said previously, employees finding self in a bad situation should remain possitive, professional and look for another position as soon as possible, there's never an excuse for a poor attitude.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    My employees are all very happy, at least thats what I'm told.
    That said though my employees are also my customers, so I have a vested interest in keeping them happy.

    I still stand by my original point though, if you are an employee if you want to be successful it is very important to be professional and maintain a possitive attitude regardless of the working enviroment and things going on around them. The most successful people are people who don't let things stand in their way or dictate their level of performance. As I said previously, employees finding self in a bad situation should remain possitive, professional and look for another position as soon as possible, there's never an excuse for a poor attitude.
    I'm not disagreeing with what you said. I just don't think most people are going to behaive as you are suggesting they should. But I will agree if you need to look for a new job, it's much easier to find one if you already have a job. So, let me ask you if that's also true with you when you are looking for a new employee? Does a persons current employment status make a difference in their chance to get hired by you?
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  7. #6  
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    It's really quite simple:
    If you do not want to do the work, don't take the money.
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    My employees are all very happy, at least thats what I'm told.
    That said though my employees are also my customers, so I have a vested interest in keeping them happy.

    I still stand by my original point though, if you are an employee if you want to be successful it is very important to be professional and maintain a possitive attitude regardless of the working enviroment and things going on around them. The most successful people are people who don't let things stand in their way or dictate their level of performance. As I said previously, employees finding self in a bad situation should remain possitive, professional and look for another position as soon as possible, there's never an excuse for a poor attitude.
    I'm not disagreeing with what you said. I just don't think most people are going to behaive as you are suggesting they should. But I will agree if you need to look for a new job, it's much easier to find one if you already have a job. So, let me ask you if that's also true with you when you are looking for a new employee? Does a persons current employment status make a difference in their chance to get hired by you?
    Unfortunately yes, when it comes to new employees you want someone who is going to fit in and be able to do the job. Generally speaking if a potential employee has not been in work for a while any employer is going to wonder why. I think if you already have a job this is definately an advantage. However that said the one thing I value above all others in an employee is the ability to get things done. So I think that if someone is unemployed for whatever reason they can really help their chances of employment by going and doing things, whether education courses, voluntary work or getting involved in local committees and projects. It is always good to able to show any potential employer that you have been busy and you've achieved plenty of things during the period of your unemployment.

    This is also really useful for making contacts and getting references. No matter what situation you may find yourself in there are always ways to improve it. I suggest you start off small with little targets and objectives that are easy to achieve, these help with confidence and help to train yourself to be able to acheive your goals. Over time you should increase your goals and set more ambitious targets.

    Also I you suggest you can try getting your foot in the door at a company you may wish to work for by offering to do voluntary work for them, if you can get your foot in the door your next objective should be trying to identify key skills the company requires, especially where those skills are only possessed by very few company employees, and work hard to aquire
    those skills. This will dramatically improve your chances of getting a permanent salaried position and may even lead to you becoming a crucial employee for the company.

    Remember the more skills you have the more versatile an employee you become and are far more useful to the company. Also you should always be upbeat and willing to help out a colleague, regardless of whether it's your responsibily or not.
    Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it. - confucius
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  9. #8  
    Forum Professor arKane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    It's really quite simple:
    If you do not want to do the work, don't take the money.
    That's pretty simplistic. For example you may have a family dependent on your having a paycheck, and because of a combination of your skills and available jobs in the area where you live, you have to take what you can get. Does that mean you should be happy about having to work for a company that provides a bad work inviornment? Also, if you are running a company that deals with the genneral public as your customer base and your unhappiest employees are the ones that are in contact with and making an impression about your company to those customers. Who is at fault, if that company fails because no one wants to shop or buy your products?
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    Unfortunately yes, when it comes to new employees you want someone who is going to fit in and be able to do the job. Generally speaking if a potential employee has not been in work for a while any employer is going to wonder why. I think if you already have a job this is definitely an advantage. However that said the one thing I value above all others in an employee is the ability to get things done. So I think that if someone is unemployed for whatever reason they can really help their chances of employment by going and doing things, whether education courses, voluntary work or getting involved in local committees and projects. It is always good to able to show any potential employer that you have been busy and you've achieved plenty of things during the period of your unemployment.

    This is also really useful for making contacts and getting references. No matter what situation you may find yourself in there are always ways to improve it. I suggest you start off small with little targets and objectives that are easy to achieve, these help with confidence and help to train yourself to be able to achieve your goals. Over time you should increase your goals and set more ambitious targets.

    Also I you suggest you can try getting your foot in the door at a company you may wish to work for by offering to do voluntary work for them, if you can get your foot in the door your next objective should be trying to identify key skills the company requires, especially where those skills are only possessed by very few company employees, and work hard to acquire
    those skills. This will dramatically improve your chances of getting a permanent salaried position and may even lead to you becoming a crucial employee for the company.

    Remember the more skills you have the more versatile an employee you become and are far more useful to the company. Also you should always be upbeat and willing to help out a colleague, regardless of whether it's your responsibility or not.
    That's some very good advice. Many companies actually hire temps with the skills they need and after a few months of working with them if they are a good fit, the company will make them an offer for permanent employment. This is both very good for the company and the possible new employee as the temp won't accept if they don't like the working environment and the temp agency will just send them out to another company.

    The thing I really like about this arrangement from an employee viewpoint is they can work at many companies as a temp and get a very good idea of what they like and don't like, and their resume just keeps getting better.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    It's really quite simple:
    If you do not want to do the work, don't take the money.
    That's pretty simplistic. For example you may have a family dependent on your having a paycheck, and because of a combination of your skills and available jobs in the area where you live, you have to take what you can get. Does that mean you should be happy about having to work for a company that provides a bad work inviornment? Also, if you are running a company that deals with the genneral public as your customer base and your unhappiest employees are the ones that are in contact with and making an impression about your company to those customers. Who is at fault, if that company fails because no one wants to shop or buy your products?
    simplistic, yes, so here is a longer version:

    If you are a manager with unhappy employees, then it is your job to create a better work environment, or fire the bad ones and replace them. If you cannot do that as a manager, then it is you that needs to move on.
    If you take a job, then go balls to the wall, doing your best. No excuses, no "phoning it in". If you feel despondent, and hate the job, this will poison both you and your fellow employees, so get out. Find something you really want to do, then get good at it.

    Long ago, I was the most productive employee in my section of a factory which was expanding. I got fired due to internal politics----a fellow who wanted the new foremans job, feared that I would get it instead of him. So, he got the night plant manager whom i had pissed off more than once by thinking for myself---with the approval and support of the chemist in charge of our product(I was a mouse cought in between 2 fighting elephants.) to fabricate a rule violation. He ended up getting the job, couldn't do it, and was fired in his turn, whereupon, they called me up and offered me the job. I'm afraid that my response was significantly less cordial than they might have expected.
    That well had been poisoned by their previous action, and I just wasn't all that thirsty. And, I was only working there to stash enough cash to afford to go to another university(my 5th), so I had a fun spring, working outside with people I actually liked, making a few dollars more, then went back to the professors and books for another 3-4 years

    But no matter what Job I took, I always gave it my full attention and abilities, and made it my own. And sometimes it worked well for me as/re the place of employment and sometimes it didn't. But it always worked well for my psyche and self image.
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  12. #11  
    Forum Professor arKane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by arKane View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by sculptor View Post
    It's really quite simple:
    If you do not want to do the work, don't take the money.
    That's pretty simplistic. For example you may have a family dependent on your having a paycheck, and because of a combination of your skills and available jobs in the area where you live, you have to take what you can get. Does that mean you should be happy about having to work for a company that provides a bad work environment? Also, if you are running a company that deals with the general public as your customer base and your unhappiest employees are the ones that are in contact with and making an impression about your company to those customers. Who is at fault, if that company fails because no one wants to shop or buy your products?
    simplistic, yes, so here is a longer version:

    If you are a manager with unhappy employees, then it is your job to create a better work environment, or fire the bad ones and replace them. If you cannot do that as a manager, then it is you that needs to move on.
    If you take a job, then go balls to the wall, doing your best. No excuses, no "phoning it in". If you feel despondent, and hate the job, this will poison both you and your fellow employees, so get out. Find something you really want to do, then get good at it.

    Long ago, I was the most productive employee in my section of a factory which was expanding. I got fired due to internal politics----a fellow who wanted the new foreman's job, feared that I would get it instead of him. So, he got the night plant manager whom i had pissed off more than once by thinking for myself---with the approval and support of the chemist in charge of our product(I was a mouse caught in between 2 fighting elephants.) to fabricate a rule violation. He ended up getting the job, couldn't do it, and was fired in his turn, whereupon, they called me up and offered me the job. I'm afraid that my response was significantly less cordial than they might have expected.
    That well had been poisoned by their previous action, and I just wasn't all that thirsty. And, I was only working there to stash enough cash to afford to go to another university(my 5th), so I had a fun spring, working outside with people I actually liked, making a few dollars more, then went back to the professors and books for another 3-4 years

    But no matter what Job I took, I always gave it my full attention and abilities, and made it my own. And sometimes it worked well for me as/re the place of employment and sometimes it didn't. But it always worked well for my psyche and self image.
    Well I applaud your attitude, but not everybody grows up the same and they may not have the luxury to be able to have your attitude. Not everybody will have your education and skill set to work with, which will limit their options. I'm not trying to defend bad employees. I just don't see any excuse for bad companies.
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    Unhappy employees should be replaced with happy employees. Problem solved.
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  14. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Unhappy employees should be replaced with happy employees. Problem solved.
    A bad company to work for is never going to have happy employees. But if bad policies can be changed to good ones, the employees they already have could become a lot happier. Another way to solve the problem.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    Unhappy employees should be replaced with happy employees. Problem solved.
    This strategy can work but it assumes the company's policies and those whom enforce or create them are, for lack of a better term, "good". Unfortunately, when the policies and employers are, "bad", then there aren't going to be many employees who are happy or just tolerate the situations. This also can result in the company getting a bad rep with fewer people interested in being employees and have effects on the remaining employees. On the other hand, If the policies are changed in a positive way, then all current employees can improve their work, fewer will need to be replaced and the company can improve its rep.
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    This can work, but can also prove to be a very costly stratergy if the employees they wish to replace have been trained at the companies expense in acquiring necessary work skills. This can mean that some companies have to come to a decision on just how bad a trained employee has to be before it becomes cost effective to replace them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisgorlitz View Post
    This can work, but can also prove to be a very costly strategy if the employees they wish to replace have been trained at the companies expense in acquiring necessary work skills. This can mean that some companies have to come to a decision on just how bad a trained employee has to be before it becomes cost effective to replace them.
    That's a good point, but sales people generally don't require much training and are easily replaceable in a weak economy. But I would think companies would have to know that unhappy sales people are going to cause problems with the company image and lose customers permanently. What are the thinking about?
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  18. #17  
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    Thought this an interesting link that looks at college majors by satisfaction and other measures after students graduate.
    StudentsReview: Job Satisfaction by Major
    Meteorologist/Naturalist & Retired Soldier
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnalbert View Post
    What were some bad places to work in the early 1900s beside the factories and textile mills?
    Working in any kind of underground mines would qualify as a bad place to work.
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  20. #19  
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    To me the worse places were always cubical jobs. I'd rather be knee deep in dead fish filling a huge canvas bucket, training a soldier to fire a weapon in 120 F Iraqi heat, or flying below the anvil of a severe thunderstorm far worse than being trapped in a room cut off from others steering at a computer screen or shuffling papers....I know because I've done all those things. I think many people assume jobs that are risky, dirty or uncomfortable are "bad" jobs--being bored and unengaged with others is far worse for me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    To me the worse places were always cubical jobs. I'd rather be knee deep in dead fish filling a huge canvas bucket, training a soldier to fire a weapon in 120 F Iraqi heat, or flying below the anvil of a severe thunderstorm far worse than being trapped in a room cut off from others steering at a computer screen or shuffling papers....I know because I've done all those things. I think many people assume jobs that are risky, dirty or uncomfortable are "bad" jobs--being bored and unengaged with others is far worse for me.
    Yes but that's more of a personal choice. I believe the OP was interested in showing bad places to work because of the way the employer treated the employees. If you need benefits anyplace without them will be a bad place to work.
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    As an employee i can say we are not perfect sometimes we screw things but sometimes we also do a good job for me it is common to see some people making a bad work and the thing is if you a the businessman you should give your employee a things to make their work nice,just like in Finland where their is a risk management service at http://www.safehouse.fi/ that really do a very difficult management but then because of being professional of many employee they are doing it well and sometimes they have a reward for making it really nice work.
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    Let's see. Our employees (about 80%) retire or die while working for us. Mostly retire.

    We do it right.
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    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Let's see. Our employees (about 80%) retire or die while working for us. Mostly retire.

    We do it right.
    Yeah but you missing out the fact that you work for the INTERNATIONAL BINGO REFEREES GUILD. providing experienced qaulity bingo callers to all homes across the florida district and beyond....
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    A company with unhappy employees has poor human relations abilities in general, which I think will eventually contaminate its attitude toward customers. This can happen through their unhappy employees, through some corporate decision, etc. They will eventually poison the pond they live in.
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    Quote Originally Posted by graemedon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by babe View Post
    Let's see. Our employees (about 80%) retire or die while working for us. Mostly retire.

    We do it right.
    Yeah but you missing out the fact that you work for the INTERNATIONAL BINGO REFEREES GUILD. providing experienced qaulity bingo callers to all homes across the florida district and beyond....
    Whack!!! I am talking about OUR BUSINESS!! *laughing*...as in self-employed! Brat!
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    Letters of Note: The Tiger Oil Memos

    From the offices of the now-defunct but at one time Houston-based Tiger Oil Company come a total of 22 enormously entertaining memos, all sent by, or on behalf of, the firm's incredibly amusing, painfully tactless, and seemingly constantly angry CEO — Edward "Tiger Mike" Davis — to his staff.
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    The introduction of zero-hour contracts and permanently temporary positions has created legalized wage-slaves. Corporations and governments do not care about the worker and are positively salivating at the prospect ofthe return to Victorian working conditions.

    You would not expect forced laborers to rate their salt-mine highly in a satisfaction survey

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