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Thread: way to slow aids

  1. #1 way to slow aids 
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    i was wondering if transplanting white blood cells from a healthy person to an aids patient might slow aids or put it into remission for a time... thoughts?


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  3. #2  
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    I think that's already done.


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  4. #3  
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    This can cause graft vs host disease in immune compromised individuals and is a dangerous procedure, it also doesn't work very well.

    This was originally tried in the early days of HIV, thymus transplants, bone marrow transplants, and white blood cell transfusions. They unfortunately don't work at all.
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_feel_tiredsleepy
    This can cause graft vs host disease in immune compromised individuals and is a dangerous procedure, it also doesn't work very well.

    This was originally tried in the early days of HIV, thymus transplants, bone marrow transplants, and white blood cell transfusions. They unfortunately don't work at all.
    oh, well it follows a logical enough train of thought... guess it doesn't work though

    what if you found a way to separate infected white blood cells from the healthy ones and transplant them back to the patient? im guessing the infected cells'd be a little heavier?
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  6. #5  
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    It could be possible to seperate HIV infected cells that were expressing HIV proteins on the surface through FACS, but the vast majority of infected cells won't be expressing any HIV proteins since it is a retro-virus and the DNA becomes incorporated into the DNA of the cell and then stays relatively dormant until the T cell is activated. Also, a FACS cost about 2000 dollars an hour to operate and is a very slow machine it would take it several days to process all the blood in a human being. Moreover, you could never guarantee that you would be able to remove all the infected cells. Then the virus particles that are actually floating in the plasma would be impossible to filter out.

    And this is ignoring the virus particles that are found in the semen and other bodily fluids, the thymus, the lymph nodes, and the spleen.
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  7. #6  
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    ... ok then, what if you genetically engineered a "neutered" hiv virus that would infect cells but never become active. would the infected blood cells then be immune to further infection by the real virus?
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by medlakeguy
    ... ok then, what if you genetically engineered a "neutered" hiv virus that would infect cells but never become active. would the infected blood cells then be immune to further infection by the real virus?
    Hmm I doubt it, since most HIV infected people are usually infected by several different strains at once. Morever, this would be very dangerous since HIV is a fast mutating virus. It is typically taboo to genetically manipulate human viruses because of the potential dangers.
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  9. #8  
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    A person with AIDS, or rather HIV, can take pills that are on the market currently to substantially prolong their life.
    "The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt" - Bertrand Russell
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by BumFluff
    A person with AIDS, or rather HIV, can take pills that are on the market currently to substantially prolong their life.
    Ya there are quite effective anti-virals and cell-surface receptor targetting medications that work reasonably well for about 10 years.
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  11. #10  
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    It is typically taboo to genetically manipulate human viruses because of the potential dangers.
    yea but i think some form of gene therapy might be the anwser... what if you made a kind of slow mutating un-aids? a virus that infects t-cells and replaces the hiv parts with the original genetic code could work, right?
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by medlakeguy
    It is typically taboo to genetically manipulate human viruses because of the potential dangers.
    yea but i think some form of gene therapy might be the anwser... what if you made a kind of slow mutating un-aids? a virus that infects t-cells and replaces the hiv parts with the original genetic code could work, right?
    Ya but this is getting into science fiction, we really don't have this kind of skill yet.
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  13. #12  
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    ture, but its around the corner...
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  14. #13  
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    It's really not, gene therapy has gone from being very promising to being very dangerous with little or now efficacy, there's no predicting which way it may go, but as refined an idea of yours would be at least anotehr 20-25 years away before someone would even consider trying it.
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  15. #14  
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    i don't know, gene therapy seems like the cure to just about everything if we can perfect it. no doubt that's been said before and yea, a lot of people in test groups end up dying but it shows a lot of promise.

    20-25 years? i get the feeling its more like 10-15, science often advances faster than people think.
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  16. #15  
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    well ok, very contentious and a lot of obstacles that I cant see aronnd at the moment but sure fingers crossed.
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  17. #16 sophomoric question 
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    "Gene therapy" to this point has been nothing little more than hype. Appears you're a kid - so I'll report that there have been a number of so-called magic therapies that have been promoted with the same hype and that have amounted to nothing - e.g. bacteriophage therapy, a subject of much work in the early-mid 20th century including a book by Sinclair Lewis. Rather than happily accept the hype - read the papers - I doubt you could actually name the reports or describe the data behind "a lot of promise"

    Back to the original question. I'll ask a question back. Why would you think transplanting WBC's from a healthy person would help? Their uninfected status is most likely due to lack of infective exposure - not lack of susceptibility or some resistance factor.
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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by i_feel_tiredsleepy
    Ya there are quite effective anti-virals and cell-surface receptor targetting medications that work reasonably well for about 10 years.
    True, but new strains are being discovered that are more-or-less immune to most of the drugs. Apparently its been long enough that the virus is starting to evolve around the drugs. This evolution is believed to be sped up by the fact that people with HIV tend to have a lot of unprotected sex with other people who have HIV (because, hey, why not?), so there's a lot of virus strain swapping among people whose bodies are loaded up with different combinations of the drugs.
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  19. #18 Other idea 
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    It would be far better to engineer a AB Negative blood cell to serve the purpose of the white blood cell. Implant marrow that only produces this type of cell and done. of course i realise the problems with this. It would have to be much smaller and completely reprogrammed, but would be a completely diffrent cell type and therefore not effected by the virus. This would at least Lengthen the persons life. Of only so many could be produced so the person would die, but much more slowly.
    Nothing is certain, but uncertainty.
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  20. #19 Re: Other idea 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chisco1389
    It would be far better to engineer a AB Negative blood cell to serve the purpose of the white blood cell. Implant marrow that only produces this type of cell and done. of course i realise the problems with this. It would have to be much smaller and completely reprogrammed, but would be a completely diffrent cell type and therefore not effected by the virus. This would at least Lengthen the persons life. Of only so many could be produced so the person would die, but much more slowly.
    What?

    This is even more ridiculous than the gene therapy proposal.
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