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Thread: Breeding extinct animals in captivity

  1. #1 Breeding extinct animals in captivity 
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    Hi I am planning to write a story something along the line of BBC's Prehistoric Park. Except for one thing, the stars of the "zoo" are animals that we have directly and indirectly caused their demise.

    I am making a list of species that we should bring back to the present. The Dodo and the Tasmanian Wolf are among them.

    Since this is a "science" forum I feel that this place would suit such a topic, I do not have much knowledge on how zoos operate or how some of the animals in really can be kept in zoos in the first place without them escaping. Amongst such questions are"

    I got an Eagle who has a wingspan of over 3 metres, how am I going to make sure she doesn't fly over her enclosure and attack the moa's enclosure nearby.

    I even saved Megalania, the giant goanna from Australia, but can it survive on goats? I got a population of deer and goat for the carnivore's enclosure.


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  3. #2 Re: Breeding extinct animals in captivity 
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttyo888
    I got an Eagle who has a wingspan of over 3 metres, how am I going to make sure she doesn't fly over her enclosure and attack the moa's enclosure nearby.
    the same way that andean indians used to trap condors : use a smallish enclosure with some bait, and since the condor needs a running start, once it's landed it cna't get out - that, or you'll need a giant aviary

    Quote Originally Posted by ttyo888
    I even saved Megalania, the giant goanna from Australia, but can it survive on goats? I got a population of deer and goat for the carnivore's enclosure.
    if crocs can survive on chickens, i don't see why goats wouldn't be good enough for goannas


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  4. #3  
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    How about the Passenger Pigeon ?

    Wikipedia:
    The passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) or wild pigeon was a species of pigeon that was once the most common bird in North America. They lived in enormous flocks, and during migration, it was possible to see flocks of them a mile (1.6 km) wide and 300 miles (500 km) long, taking several days to pass and containing up to a billion birds.

    Contain that!

    OK but since this is a science (read "geek") forum, may I suggest the Fraser Delta marine snail? Her demise is blamed on penile growths in female snails, caused by ships' antifoulant paint, which ...complicated... breeding. We also mourn the loss of many lamprey, hagfish, leeches, and other jawless sucking scumdweller species. Don't they deserve glory?

    Did we hunt woolly mammoth to extinction I wonder?
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  5. #4  
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    Oh yes definitely! Among the animals that I will bring back in my park the passenger pigeon is among the ones I am going to back from the past.

    Others include the Thylacine, the Dodo, the Diprotodon, Lonesome George, Quagga.

    The more stranger choices include the Yangtze River Dolphin and the Southern Chinese Tiger.

    My main characters will also clash with humans from differing time periods ranging from ancient maori to early european settlement and Maoist China and they may have to resort to TASERing the poachers or hunters to save the animals they are trying to bring back.
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  6. #5  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    do you intend to bring neanderthals back ? in which case, you have an ethical dilemma : do they belong in a zoo ?

    btw, you can't bring lonesome george back from the dead, he's not dead yet !
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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  7. #6 Re: Breeding extinct animals in captivity 
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttyo888
    I got an Eagle who has a wingspan of over 3 metres, how am I going to make sure she doesn't fly over her enclosure and attack the moa's enclosure nearby.
    In the raptor rescue here in Montreal some of the large birds of prey are kept tethered to a perch, while the ravens have an aviary, these are quite a bit smaller than an eagle of that size, but I'd imagine the same techniques would be used. I think a good first step would be to visit some zoos...
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    do you intend to bring neanderthals back ? in which case, you have an ethical dilemma : do they belong in a zoo ?

    btw, you can't bring lonesome george back from the dead, he's not dead yet !
    Sorry no neanderthals, we did not hunt them to extinction.

    And according to Life in Cold Blood, Lonesome George is the only living individual of his species. Once he dies, his species will be declared extinct.

    And yah I decided to have a giant aviary for the extinct birds including that giant eagle. There will be a walkthrough that is on the top of the forest and a small monorail.

    The only problem is how to make sure the 3m Eagle doesn't attack the other birds in the exhibit and also the visitors and keepers alike,
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttyo888
    Quote Originally Posted by marnixR
    do you intend to bring neanderthals back ? in which case, you have an ethical dilemma : do they belong in a zoo ?

    btw, you can't bring lonesome george back from the dead, he's not dead yet !
    Sorry no neanderthals, we did not hunt them to extinction.

    And according to Life in Cold Blood, Lonesome George is the only living individual of his species. Once he dies, his species will be declared extinct.

    And yah I decided to have a giant aviary for the extinct birds including that giant eagle. There will be a walkthrough that is on the top of the forest and a small monorail.

    The only problem is how to make sure the 3m Eagle doesn't attack the other birds in the exhibit and also the visitors and keepers alike,
    Keep it well fed? I wouldn't expect mixed birds of prey in an aviary.
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  10. #9  
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    mammoth.
    "Kill them all and let God sort them out."

    - Arnaud Amalric

    http://spuriousforums.com/index.php
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  11. #10  
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    And one more thing, I am planning to save 3 aquatic mammals namely, the Carribean Monk Seal, The Yangtze River Dolphin and the Stellar's Sea Cow. As I can see, those mammals are pretty heavy. How do people get aquatic animals from aquariums?
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  12. #11  
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    This zoo is in the future, no? Why not simply invent a technology? There are some non-lethal weapons made for humans. Maybe some derivative for birds? It could be a force field you could direct in any direction. Maybe 4 sides and then a horizontal one from a nearby mountain top? It could be tuned to affect only avians, so humans can walk around unobstructed. In fact, you could make all the enclosures that way, with each enclosure tuned to a species? You can decide on what happens when an animal enters the field: Maybe it is gripped by nausea or light-headedness? The field would have to have the property of varying intensity, with the centre being the worst so animals could start to sense discomfort, but still have enough faculties to be able to return to the comfort zone. You could mark where the middle of the field is so visitors and keepers would be able to know where the safe-zone is?

    Just some thoughts :wink:
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  13. #12  
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    Bring back Dragons!
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  14. #13  
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    Yah I am bringing back Megalania to the park. I heard that the megafauna in Australia had survived climate very well until humanity started burning down the habitat like incense.
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttyo888
    And one more thing, I am planning to save 3 aquatic mammals namely, the Carribean Monk Seal, The Yangtze River Dolphin and the Stellar's Sea Cow. As I can see, those mammals are pretty heavy. How do people get aquatic animals from aquariums?
    Do you realize that the Carribean Monk Seal was just declared extinct? It's been suspected for awhile but just recently officially declared. Also, the Yangtze River Dolphin may not officially be extinct, but is likely functionally extinct. Just thought I'd bring those points up.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chemboy
    Do you realize that the Carribean Monk Seal was just declared extinct? It's been suspected for awhile but just recently officially declared. Also, the Yangtze River Dolphin may not officially be extinct, but is likely functionally extinct. Just thought I'd bring those points up.
    I see.... but anyway even if there are any survivors, their weakened genetic vigor or genetic diversity cannot sustain their species for long and would lead to problems in the long run.

    Other species that lived along side the extinct animals will be saved too. On the quest to save the Thylacine, I travelled back to 1810 and saved the Tasmanian Emu and also a family of Tasmanian Devils who do not have the facial tumor that plague their modern day descendants.
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttyo888
    I see.... but anyway even if there are any survivors, their weakened genetic vigor or genetic diversity cannot sustain their species for long and would lead to problems in the long run.
    I realize that, I just wanted to point out that they're not technically extinct.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
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  18. #17  
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    So you are hinting that they probably are hiding somewhere? The Carribean Monk Seal has little fear of humanity. And Master Yoda's saying was kinda right for animals.

    Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, Hate leads to Survival. From a certain point of view.

    Also I heard that inbreeding can be disasterous for a species, the devil facial tumor I heard was caused by a low genetic variety in the Tazzie Devil population.
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  19. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttyo888
    So you are hinting that they probably are hiding somewhere? The Carribean Monk Seal has little fear of humanity. And Master Yoda's saying was kinda right for animals.

    Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, Hate leads to Survival. From a certain point of view.

    Also I heard that inbreeding can be disasterous for a species, the devil facial tumor I heard was caused by a low genetic variety in the Tazzie Devil population.
    Not hinting at any such thing. You should realize that I'm just very picky about things, and if a species isn't officially declared extinct then I'm not going to declare it as such, functionally extinct or not. So don't mind me, I'm just being picky about it. Not overly picky in my opinion, but you don't need to pay heed to my posts if you personally would like to look at them as being officially extinct.
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
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