Notices
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Testable Prediction

  1. #1 Testable Prediction 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2
    Hi, I am doing this worksheet and we have to find the flaw in a prediction. What is the best way to find a flaw in a prediction? I am having trouble.
    Here is one that I did:
    Pred.:Salamanders disappear from wet flowerbeds
    Flaw:Salamanders may dislike water, so water may be the real influence.

    Is that the right way? Any suggestions is greatly appreciated.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. GhostofMaxwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Thames estuary
    Posts
    851
    Im not sure what youre looking for but what youve got down as a flaw is actually a support for your prediction.


    Es ist Zeit für sauberen



    You guys
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. GhostofMaxwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Thames estuary
    Posts
    851
    Oh wait a minute .... I see what you mean.

    If you write. flaw: salamanders hate water so they most likely wouldnt be there in the first place. It may sound less confusing. But you're actually right.
    Es ist Zeit für sauberen



    You guys
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,190
    hmmm - I would say the flaw is that the predictions doesn't say why the salamanders would disappear from wet flower beds. Do they leave, or do they die? Do they leave because of the flowers? Because of the wet? Because of the mulch used in the beds?

    Usually predictions are made based on a hypothesis. Is there a hypothesis given too, or just a prediction?
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2
    It just says the Hyposethis-Salamanders disappear from the flowerbed because the bed became too wet. Like the prediction says "Wet flowerbeds should have few salamanders." I'm thinking that the word choice "should" is the flaw. Any suggestions?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,190
    Well, I have to say I don't think that hypothesis is very well phrased either. Let's say that the hypothesis is: "Salamanders don't like wet soil." And the prediction you were given says, "Wet flowerbeds should have few salamanders." This sounds ok on the surface, but here's the problem: what is "a few" salamanders? If you go to a wet flowerbed and find five salamanders, is that a lot of salamanders, or a little? You need a comparison. The prediction should say, "If the hypothesis is true, then we expect wet flowerbeds to have less salamanders than dry flowerbeds."
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Ph.D. GhostofMaxwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Thames estuary
    Posts
    851
    Its difficult to give a definitive answer, especially because we dont know what kind of thing the question looking for.

    What grade are you in?
    Es ist Zeit für sauberen



    You guys
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •