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Thread: Contralateral Representation of human body

  1. #1 Contralateral Representation of human body 
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    I was wondering what is the evolutionary advantage of the contralateral representation of the body?

    What is the importance of one part of the body being controlled by the opposite part of the brain? (i'm referring to motor and sensory functions not co-ordination)


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  3. #2 hello everybody! 
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    even if there's no definite answer for this question. please post your ideas. i really need to get some idea about this!


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  4. #3  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    what do you mean by the "contralateral representation of the body" ?
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
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    if you have a stroke, and the right hand side of your face "drops", then it is the left hand side of the brain which has been damaged.........yes
    be nice im new
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  6. #5  
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    what do you mean by the "contralateral representation of the body" ?
    that means, one side of the body is represented by the opposite side of the brain.

    So, what do you think might be the evolutionary advantage of this phenomenon? Has this helped the animals to survive and reproduce?
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    Forum Freshman Warpboy's Avatar
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    Maybe this is an odd perspective but it could be true. From an evolutionary standpoint the brain could have developed to form two hemispheres to create a balance for the bodily functions. For example the right side of the brain controls the movement of the left arm. Because we are more likely to be using both arms at one time for some sort of 'evolutionary task' we could have evolved the contralateral representation to help guide more precision. During an activity such as catching a ball (with both hands) you could assume that to help guide both hands in a exact precision the neurons signaled from each hemisphere of the brain must converse or coordinate to enable the ball to be caught. By evolving the contralateral representation this allows the hemispheres and the neurons signaled from them to become more exact because they cross over before reaching their destination. Once again, just an interesting thesis.
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  8. #7  
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
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    i must admit to being a Gould-ist in this respect - not every aspect needs to be directly adaptationist, some things just happened, others may be constrained because of developmental paths

    fair enough if someone can show that it definitely is an adaptation, but i wouldn't be too disheartened if it wasn't
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  9. #8 hi 
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    Maybe this is an odd perspective but it could be true. From an evolutionary standpoint the brain could have developed to form two hemispheres to create a balance for the bodily functions. For example the right side of the brain controls the movement of the left arm. Because we are more likely to be using both arms at one time for some sort of 'evolutionary task' we could have evolved the contralateral representation to help guide more precision. During an activity such as catching a ball (with both hands) you could assume that to help guide both hands in a exact precision the neurons signaled from each hemisphere of the brain must converse or coordinate to enable the ball to be caught. By evolving the contralateral representation this allows the hemispheres and the neurons signaled from them to become more exact because they cross over before reaching their destination. Once again, just an interesting thesis.
    But co-ordination is a function of cerebellum, which sends nerve fibers in an ipsilateral manner.
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