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Thread: From bacteria/cell to animal

  1. #1 From bacteria/cell to animal 
    Forum Professor Obviously's Avatar
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    Hello,

    I was wondering how the first animal may have come to be. I don't know how bacteria or cells can become something as complex as an animal, so I was hoping to learn something new


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  3. #2 read on evolution 
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    if I'm going to give an answer it will be repeating an evolution chapter on any biology book. so read one and ask anything you don't understand.


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    Oh, ok. Sorry if I wasted your time on this. I was just curious.
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  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    The early cells, such as bacteria, were comparatively simple. They had no distinct nucleus and no large organelles to carry out particular functions. These 'simple' cells are called prokaryotes. From them evolved the eucaryotes, with a nucleus and a complex cell structure. However, the first eucaryotes were still single celled beasties.
    In parallel with these deveopments the emergence of photosynthesis was slowly transforming the Earth's atmosphere to an oxygen rich one. Once the concentration of oxygen became high enough it was possible for cells to group together and still get reasonable access to oxygen.
    Look up the interesting 'beast' called the slime mold. It's unicellular, but in times of hardship a large group of cells come together forming a 'thing' that moves across the ground, then forms a spore body that disperses its spores on the wind. Multicellular animals may have started in a similar way.
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    Forum Freshman Nikolas_Miller's Avatar
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    Some scientist and theorist believe that the some of organelles inside of plant and animal cells were once independent bodies of their own, functioning with out a host. This is most commonly thought of ribosomes and chloroplasts.
    Eventually, they believe, these bodies took refuge in a prokaryotic cell...and the rest is history.
    Philosophy consists very largely of one philosopher arguing that all others are jackasses. He usually proves it, and I should add that he also usually proves that he is one himself.
    --Henry Louis Mencken.
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  7. #6  
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    intriguing question, the first link below goes over some basics about it, unfortunately the more comprehensive link in it doesnt seem to work, the wikipedia link goes over some hypotheses on it.

    http://www.cartage.org.lb/en/themes/...enetictree.htm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evoluti...lticellularity
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  8. #7  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikolas_Miller
    Some scientist and theorist believe that the some of organelles inside of plant and animal cells were once independent bodies of their own, functioning with out a host. This is most commonly thought of ribosomes and chloroplasts.
    Eventually, they believe, these bodies took refuge in a prokaryotic cell...and the rest is history.
    I think you mean chloroplasts and mitochondria. Ribosomes are complex molecules, not potentially independent organisms. Both mitochondria and chloroplasts have their own DNA and express their own proteins, further supporting this theory.
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    Quote Originally Posted by Nikolas_Miller
    Some scientist and theorist believe that the some of organelles inside of plant and animal cells were once independent bodies of their own, functioning with out a host. This is most commonly thought of ribosomes and chloroplasts.
    Eventually, they believe, these bodies took refuge in a prokaryotic cell...and the rest is history.
    I think you mean chloroplasts and mitochondria. Ribosomes are complex molecules, not potentially independent organisms. Both mitochondria and chloroplasts have their own DNA and express their own proteins, further supporting this theory.
    yes i did, thanks for the correction.
    Philosophy consists very largely of one philosopher arguing that all others are jackasses. He usually proves it, and I should add that he also usually proves that he is one himself.
    --Henry Louis Mencken.
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  10. #9  
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    hehe cellular battle of the species.
    back when plant cells and animal cells battled for dominion.
    when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth
    A.C Doyle
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  11. #10  
    Forum Professor Obviously's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the info This was quite interesting :wink:
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nikolas_Miller
    Some scientist and theorist believe that the some of organelles inside of plant and animal cells were once independent bodies of their own, functioning with out a host. This is most commonly thought of ribosomes and chloroplasts.
    Eventually, they believe, these bodies took refuge in a prokaryotic cell...and the rest is history.
    Like paralith pointed out, it is mitochondria and chloroplasts. And, if anyone feels like looking into it farther, look up "endosymbiotic theory."
    "There is a kind of lazy pleasure in useless and out-of-the-way erudition." -Jorge Luis Borges
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  13. #12  
    Forum Freshman adamd164's Avatar
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    Presumably, "parasites" such as Mitochondria were incorported into these original, simple, prokaryotic cells, enabling them to more effectively harnass energy resources and ergo survive to reproduce. Aerobic respiration necessitates the presence of the mitochondrion. These organisms then became far less wasteful. A major evolutionary stepping stone would have been the point at which cells began to group themselves together. No longer was it a case of 'every cell for itself', but organisation took hold, the interest of every individual cell better served by working towards a common good. From here, the evolution of animals, in Darwinian terms, is axiomatic.
    Knowledge of evolution may not be strictly useful in everyday commerce. You can live some sort of life and die without ever hearing the name of Darwin. But if, before you die, you want to understand why you lived in the first place, Darwinism is the one subject that you must study.

    ~ Richard Dawkins
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  14. #13 hello there 
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    i added an article on this to my blog,

    check it out:

    http://www.pulasthi.info/2007/08/how...rth-begin.html
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  15. #14 Re: hello there 
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    Quote Originally Posted by pulasthi
    i added an article on this to my blog,

    check it out:

    http://www.pulasthi.info/2007/08/how...rth-begin.html
    But the question related to how bacterial cells evolved into animals, not how life on earth began! :?
    Knowledge of evolution may not be strictly useful in everyday commerce. You can live some sort of life and die without ever hearing the name of Darwin. But if, before you die, you want to understand why you lived in the first place, Darwinism is the one subject that you must study.

    ~ Richard Dawkins
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  16. #15 Re: From bacteria/cell to animal 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Obviously
    Hello,

    I was wondering how the first animal may have come to be. I don't know how bacteria or cells can become something as complex as an animal, so I was hoping to learn something new

    if life began on a microscopic level, as you would be hoping for.........for some explanation to your question...........what also if it began on another level, beyon microscopic...........that a deal was struck between two "ideals" to foster relations for ideals not yet properly "managed"..........managed by.....(and now you must think my son)...the level those ideals struck the agreement on?
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