Notices
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: aromatherapy

  1. #1 aromatherapy 
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    tunisia
    Posts
    4
    Hello every body
    I'd like to know if there's someone who knows the vertues of Citrus aurantium and it's applications in aromatherapy.
    Thank you


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    The whole subject of aromatherapy borders on pseudoscience in that there is no proven therapeutic effect except maybe as a placebo. When you ask such a specific question, I think that definitely pushes it over the edge.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. Wolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    969
    Oh, I don't know about that.

    Different kinds of scents invoke different responses in both my psychie and by body.

    I sometimes light a candle near my computer (mostly because I'm a pyro) because the smell of the candle can help me relax, or help me focus.

    In an extremely broad example, the smell of food has a profound effect on our body and mind. Why couldn't other scents as well?
    Wolf
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    "Be fair with others, but then keep after them until they're fair with you." Alan Alda
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    I'd put it in almost the same category as the Chinese herb medicines. Some of it probably works to an extent, a lot of it looks like nonsense, and not much has been proven. To do that would require some clinical studies which nobody will probably be funding any time soon.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8
    There is no proof that aromatherapy works. As Harold mentioned, it is probably a placebo effect and borders on pseudoscience.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Ph.D. Wolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    969
    Think of something you like the smell of. When you smell that, does it make you happy to smell it? If so, the smell is having an impact on you. If you say you like the smell of something, but it doesn't change your mood, disposition, or body in any way, how do you know you like it?

    If I play soothing music, I relax. It's not so far a reach to also experience conscious and physical effects from any of our other senses, so why not smell, too?

    Aromatherapy may be largely a crock, but there is a methodology to it. The probability that one particular scent may be soothing to a wide range of people, lends that scent to be labeled in such a fashion to be used for soothing.

    And no proof? If I were to be equally as ignorant, I could say there's no proof it doesn't.

    But aside from my own experiences, and that of others I know...a 5 second bout of Google-Fu produced an indication that quite a few studies have been done. I'm not saying they prove anything (nor that a 5 second search counts as proof) but they are seeing some results and effects.

    Of course, since aromatherapy is typically a natural method (ie - using natural ingredients) many "scientific" individuals (whom we won't call closed minded) have instantly labeled aromatherapy a farce. Probably because the scents weren't created in a lab using a formula, which is the only acceptable way to produce anything.

    I also don't know why when someone mentions "aromatherapy" people think if only candles and miracle cures. Walking in the woods, smelling fresh air, is aromatherapy. In a detrimental form, smelling exhaust fumes from a passing city bus is aromatherapy, too.

    I won't deny that some aspects of aromatherapy are probably ineffective, and all in the suggestive mind of the user, but lets remember that aromatherapy isn't just using candles to cure cancer. There's many more aspects of aromatherapy. Saying "aromatherapy doesn't exist" is like saying "science doesn't exist" simply because there are some crackpot projects going on.

    Here's some links for the muse:

    http://www.wlnaturalhealth.com/aroma...y-research.htm

    http://altmed.creighton.edu/Aromatherapy/Studies.htm

    http://www.holisticonline.com/Aromat...a_benefits.htm

    http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/aromatherapy/32012
    Wolf
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    "Be fair with others, but then keep after them until they're fair with you." Alan Alda
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,190
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf
    Think of something you like the smell of. When you smell that, does it make you happy to smell it? If so, the smell is having an impact on you. If you say you like the smell of something, but it doesn't change your mood, disposition, or body in any way, how do you know you like it?
    This is largely due to associative memory, and not necessarily from the smell itself. Thus one single smell can mean different things to different people, based solely on their past experiences with it. Smells are also indicators of things - if food has gone rotten, or if flowers are blooming. The smells tell us something, and that significance may affect our mood, but that doesn't mean that smell alone is the cause.
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Ph.D. Wolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    This is largely due to associative memory, and not necessarily from the smell itself. Thus one single smell can mean different things to different people, based solely on their past experiences with it.
    True, but there is usually a pretty strong pattern. What's more likely to invoke a pleasant moment in others? The smell of fresh flowers, or rotting socks?

    Even though there is no certainty that everyone reacts similarly to the same scents, there is enough of a probability that there will be an effect for people (maybe even the majority).

    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    The smells tell us something, and that significance may affect our mood, but that doesn't mean that smell alone is the cause.
    Maybe. But there is an effect, and that effect alone can certainly be used.

    If you know something triggers relaxation, even if is not solely responsible for the relaxation, doesn't it make sense to use that something if relaxation is desired?

    I guess you could say aromatherapy is the practice of triggering, rather than the "brute force" of direct medicine.

    Cinnamon appears to be a scent favored by those seeking concentration, while lilac appears to be preferred by those seeking rest. Vanilla is often used for relaxation. Although these effects are not universal for all people (my Aunt for instance hates the smell of vanilla), you can't deny that nothing is happening here.

    Even if the whole reaction is memory driven, do you think the individuals would have experienced the same reaction in a room with no smells?

    Also, if the whole reaction is simply memory related, how come thinking about the smell of vanilla (or whatever) doesn't appear to have as much an effect as actually smelling it? (Oddly enough, scent coming from a natural source also proves to be more effective than scent artificially created.)

    If you agree that the scent is amplifying (or even just supporting) the effect, then the scent does have significance.

    Quote Originally Posted by ellouzeines
    Hello every body
    I'd like to know if there's someone who knows the vertues of Citrus aurantium and it's applications in aromatherapy.
    Thank you
    Darn, ellouzeines...I think we forgot to answer you question! Sorry 'bout that!

    Here you go:
    Citrus Aurantium is found in several forms. I think the one you're looking for is produced from Bergamot. See below:

    Bergamot peel is used in perfumery for its ability to combine with an array of scents to form a bouquet of aromas which compliment each other. Approximately one third of all men's perfumes contain bergamot juice and about half of women's. Bergamot was a component of the original Eau de Cologne developed in 17th century Germany - in 1704 the bergamot was first used to make the now famous "Eau de toilette" from the bergamot fruit by scooping out the pulp and squeezing the juice into sponges.

    Bergamot peel is also used in aromatherapy to treat depression and as a digestive aid.

    Sources:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bergamot_orange
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citrus_aurantium
    Wolf
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    "Be fair with others, but then keep after them until they're fair with you." Alan Alda
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Cosmic Wizard paralith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,190
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf
    Also, if the whole reaction is simply memory related, how come thinking about the smell of vanilla (or whatever) doesn't appear to have as much an effect as actually smelling it? (Oddly enough, scent coming from a natural source also proves to be more effective than scent artificially created.)

    If you agree that the scent is amplifying (or even just supporting) the effect, then the scent does have significance.
    Touche, my friend. Good point. Definitely the memories are far stronger in response to the actual smell. If nothing else smells can elicit more intense memories. Of course, the same could be said of actually seeing, say, a beautiful sunset, as opposed to just remembering. This just means that smells probably don't do much in the absence of a previously established memory association - unless it is something like rotting food, which we probably instinctually recognize as bad - an adaptation to keep us from eating bad meat =p
    Man can will nothing unless he has first understood that he must count on no one but himself; that he is alone, abandoned on earth in the midst of his infinite responsibilities, without help, with no other aim than the one he sets himself, with no other destiny than the one he forges for himself on this earth.
    ~Jean-Paul Sartre
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Ph.D. Wolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    Of course, the same could be said of actually seeing, say, a beautiful sunset, as opposed to just remembering.
    There is a very strong understanding of visual linkage, as well. Ever wonder why the "green room" in studio sets is painted green? Or why McDonalds chose the colors red and yellow?

    I think there's strong reason to suspect that there's a way of utilizing all our senses to achieve an effect. We already widely accept that music has an effect on us. As does touch. I don't see it as illogical to also assume such a force through our other senses.

    Quote Originally Posted by paralith
    This just means that smells probably don't do much in the absence of a previously established memory association
    I suppose. But if that's the case, what happens when you smell something new? Say, yer trying a new cologne or perfume? Although I suppose that could be a reaction from the perception of multiple familiar scents derived from the new scent. All I can say is that I have been to places, smelled something new, and still had a sensation from it.

    Another kicker. What about pheromones? There's already been a lot of research into just how much our sense of smell impacts our bodies and minds.
    Wolf
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    "Be fair with others, but then keep after them until they're fair with you." Alan Alda
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolf
    Bergamot peel is also used in aromatherapy to treat depression and as a digestive aid.
    Yep. Pseudoscience.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Ph.D. Wolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    Yep. Pseudoscience.
    What's your definition of pseudoscience?

    Pulling out Webster:

    Pseudoscience: An activity resembling science but based on fallacious assumptions. A theory, methodology, or practice that is considered to be without scientific foundation.

    I think we just worked out in the posts above that the area of aromatherapy has both method, effect, evidence, and scientific processes. So why's it still pseudoscience? Because it doesn't have a mathematical equation? What other evidence do you want that the sense of smell has an effect on the body?
    Wolf
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    "Be fair with others, but then keep after them until they're fair with you." Alan Alda
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    8,795
    If you are going to claim that bergamot has some efficacy for depression or to aid digestion, I believe you should have some scientific evidence of such. That would involve a clinical trial, or some other sort of evidence, wouldn't it? If you make such a claim without such evidence, I think that fits your definition of pseudoscience.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Ph.D. Wolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370
    If you are going to claim that bergamot has some efficacy for depression or to aid digestion, I believe you should have some scientific evidence of such. That would involve a clinical trial, or some other sort of evidence, wouldn't it? If you make such a claim without such evidence, I think that fits your definition of pseudoscience.
    Do you have evidence that it doesn't? Or did you just not bother to look and are making some sort of guess? Sounds like you're just shooting the idea down because you don't happen to know anyone whose claimed to have taken bergamot extract for stomach problems. (I'll bet they have, and just don't know it. )

    Why are you so quick to burn this topic as crap? Do you have some kind of reasoning behind your statement that it's all fake, other than an unfounded hunch? If you're going to come in and blast the topic, you'd better back things up, otherwise it's just trolling. You claim I am stating something without evidence, yet the only way you could say that honestly is if you had done research for aromatherapy and found nothing about it, about the studies, results, methods, practices, or science behind the layman top-level concepts. Given that there is, you're either just spouting an opinion which is off topic and flame intended, or you're trying to convince us of your argument without any scientific process yourself! :?

    You say there's no evidence, yet I've pointed out quite a bit already. You say there's no studies or methodology, yet I've pointed out that there's quite a bit of that, too.

    The response to what bergamot was used for, that I posted, was a snip from Wikipedia. It answered the thread author's question. There was no need to paste up all the evidence. Evidence was not what the thread author asked for. Neither did the thread author ask for an analysis of the field of aromatherapy. I apologize for that on my end.

    BTW, bergamot is one variety of a type of fruit you may consider mythical but we morons call "oranges." A fruit whose properties have been proven by both private and government studies to have health benefits. But then again the study of how food and other natural substances effect the body is all fantasy. There's no proof. Food effecting our stomachs is crazy talk. There's never been a case of a fruit or vegetable doing anything other than providing nutrients once digested. How does the government/world put up with such nonsense?

    As for "treating depression?" We've already discussed that smell can and does trigger mood changes in people. In this case, a scent is being used to trigger mood changes which counteract depression. Since there's already an understanding of what scents potentially cause certain mood changes, they pick the scent(s) that are likely to trigger happy moods, verses those that trigger relaxation or sleep.

    But I digress...judging by the blank arguments, you're either playing devil's advocate, or trying to start a flame war. The prior is fine, only if you note it first. The later I won't get in to (any further). The initial facts and evidence are on the table. If you choose to ignore it, it's not my fault. I've done my job as a scientific observer.

    I've answered the thread-author's question. The rest of this is off topic.
    Wolf
    ---------------------------------------------------------
    "Be fair with others, but then keep after them until they're fair with you." Alan Alda
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •