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Thread: Reproduction abstinence: genetic selection.

  1. #1 Reproduction abstinence: genetic selection. 
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    Situation-X: there is no overpopulation and resources are sufficient

    What selection conditions can be applied to direct a species' evolutionary path toward: instinctively wanting to not reproduce before death in Situation-X?

    Note that - instinctively wanting to not reproduce before death
    is not the same as - having no instinct to reproduce before death

    I can't think of a selection condition that be applied to give this desired result.
    The suitable fields of application is psychology and population control.

    Let's have a human population in Situation-X.
    I assume that a portion of people this population don't want to reproduce and just want to die.
    What percentage of that population makes up this portion?


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  3. #2  
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    Is this a course question? If so what are your thought? There are entire groups of animals where this is common and evolved independently many times.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Is this a course question?
    What's a course question?
    If you're talking about regarding school, then no.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    If so what are your thought?


    I asked this question because I watched the first 14 seconds of this video.
    I tried to figure out of what selection conditions could create the desire to abstain, which seems to be an evolutionary paradox.
    I didn't manage to think of a solution.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    There are entire groups of animals where this is common and evolved independently many times.
    Could you give me some examples?
    I can't find any examples on the wiki page here.
    Last edited by RamenNoodles; September 23rd, 2017 at 09:07 AM. Reason: Formatting
    Quote Originally Posted by jocular View Post
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  5. #4  
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    Please refine your question....

    You start with a general question about species--of which the closest is many colonial animals (e.g. bees) for which high-maintenance offspring and close kinship have evolved members that contribute to the reproductive success of close relatives but don't have their own instinct to reproduce.

    As for humans, there might be something similar going on with women explaining why they lose their reproductive capability long before their potential lifespans--some sort of evolutionary optimization between lower-chance of high-maintenance offspring (even worse than bees) survival (due to age and birth defects) versus contribution and improved success of close kins in tight tribal societies (where we evolved).
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Please refine your question.... You start with a general question about species--of which the closest is many colonial animals (e.g. bees)
    I see what you mean. I refer to a species of animal with brains that have developed the instinct to reproduce.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    You start with a general question about species--of which the closest is many colonial animals (e.g. bees) for which high-maintenance offspring and close kinship have evolved members that contribute to the reproductive success of close relatives but don't have their own instinct to reproduce.
    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    Note that - instinctively wanting to not reproduce before death
    is not the same as - having no instinct to reproduce before death
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    You start with a general question about species--of which the closest is many colonial animals (e.g. bees) for which high-maintenance offspring and close kinship have evolved members that contribute to the reproductive success of close relatives but don't have their own instinct to reproduce.
    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    Situation-X: there is no overpopulation and resources are sufficient
    What selection conditions can be applied to direct a species' evolutionary path toward: instinctively wanting to not reproduce before death in Situation-X?
    I refer to selection conditions which direct the entire species to abstinence.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    As for humans, there might be something similar going on with women explaining why they lose their reproductive capability long before their potential lifespans--some sort of evolutionary optimization between lower-chance of high-maintenance offspring (even worse than bees) survival (due to age and birth defects) versus contribution and improved success of close kins in tight tribal societies (where we evolved).
    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    Situation-X: there is no overpopulation and resources are sufficient
    What selection conditions can be applied to direct a species' evolutionary path toward: instinctively wanting to not reproduce before death in Situation-X?
    Regarding human females, they, before losing their reproductive capability, have (I presume) the instinct to reproduce while still alive.
    The key of my question is about the instinct to not reproduce at any point of time, when alive.
    I think menopause doesn't lead to wanting to not reproduce. I think menopause leads to not wanting to reproduce.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by RamenNoodles View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox View Post
    Please refine your question.... You start with a general question about species--of which the closest is many colonial animals (e.g. bees)
    I see what you mean. I refer to a species of animal with brains that have developed the instinct to reproduce.
    So am I! Most insects have that as do more intelligent animals.

    "I think menopause doesn't lead to wanting to not reproduce. I think menopause leads to not wanting to reproduce."
    Huh?

    I'm still not sure what you after in this thread. A talk about species, then individuals, while rejecting some of nature's more spectacular examples because you seem to vastly overestimate the intelligence required for reproduction, then return to species. What are you getting at? A species view seems to defy logic, since ones that evolve no capacity to reproduce--cease to exist. If you mean for short periods, say less than a life cycle, than sure--nature offers many of them as well--when environmental triggers don't start a mating cycle for example until conditions are more favorable (e.g. shifting bird mating as a result of climate change).
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