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Thread: Ten Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs (and Cats)

  1. #1 Ten Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs (and Cats) 
    flattened rat 甘肃人's Avatar
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    I came across this article surfing. Ten Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs.

    It's one of those teaser websites that just give you the info your after in small bits. You have to open ten different windows. So given the seriousness of the subject matter, I will cut and paste all ten foods here for you, and your dog - I'm guessing the lazy S.O.B. never learned to read.

    Most dog owners know itís not a great idea to feed their canine pal from the dinner table, but once in a while, pieces of food happen to get slipped to a dog. While this is usually fine, there are some people foods that dogs should absolutely not have. Certain foods can be dangerous or even deadly to your dog. Knowing which ones can help you avoid a tragic accident.

    1. Garlic and Onions
    Keep onions and garlic far away from your dog. Both vegetables are frequently used in human cooking to add flavor, but to a canine they spell trouble. Raw onions and garlic are the most dangerous, but you should avoid exposure to any form of the flavorful foods. Certain compounds within items of the onion family can cause toxicosis in pets. Unfortunately, the symptoms may not show up for three or four days after ingestion. You will notice that your dog seems lazy and his urine will be orange or dark red.

    2.Chocolate
    Chocolate may seem like the ultimate treat to dogs with a sweet tooth. Sadly, the caffeine and the theobromine in the chocolate can be deadly to animals. The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is. If your dog does ingest some chocolate, he may experience vomiting, irritation and pain in his abdomen. Seizures and death may occur in cases where large amounts of chocolate were ingested.

    3. Avocado
    Nearly all parts of the avocado tree are toxic to animals, including the fruit. In order to actually poison your pet, he would have to eat quite a bit of the avocado fruit. However, the toxins in the flesh and skin of the avocado are not the only problem. The pit can also pose a choking hazard. If swallowed, it could cause an intestinal blockage.

    4. Xylitol
    You may not recognize this ingredient, but chances are itís found in your sugar-free gum or any other sugar-free items you keep on hand. The artificial sweetener doesnít cause problems in humans, but if a dog eats it, his blood sugar levels will drop drastically. Seizures and confusion may result. In cases where a dog has eaten a large amount of xylitol, liver failure is one of the more serious problems.

    5. Chicken
    Poultry is a danger to dogs, not because of toxins it contains, but because of the bones. Chicken bones splinter and can cause stomach and bowel obstructions or worse. Raw chicken is safe to give to animals, but once cooked, the bones become potentially deadly weapons. If you suspect your dog has eaten a chicken bone, keep a close eye on him. At any sign of pain or discomfort, see a vet. Often, the bone fragments will pass naturally and without serious effect, but this is not always true.

    6. Moldy Food
    It might seem natural to toss an older piece of food to your pup, knowing that heíll eat it even if you wonít. Unfortunately, this could be problematic if the food has mold on it. Some molds that grow on food contain tremorgenic mycotoxins. These toxins can cause tremors which become increasingly worse until they turn into convulsions. The end result, if left untreated, could be death. Avoid giving your dog moldy food and be careful not to leave moldy item in the garbage where your dog might be able to sniff it out.

    7. Corn on the Cob
    A corn cob may seem like a harmless thing for your dog to chew on, but it can actually be fatal. Bits of corn cob can cause intestinal obstructions, which can lead to serious complications.

    8. Dairy Products
    Skip giving your dog milk or ice cream, since most dogs are lactose intolerant. While not exactly dangerous, the results are unpleasant. Expect excessive gas and diarrhea with too much dairy. That being said, small amounts of cheese and yogurt may be fine for your dog, since they have minimal amounts of lactose.

    9. Raw Salmon
    Giving your dog a piece of raw salmon is never a good idea. While cooked salmon is fine, the raw fish can cause SPD (Salmon Poisoning Disease). The disease is caused by parasites and can resemble the parvovirus. The most common symptoms include a high fever about a week after eating the fish, followed by vomiting and bloody yellow diarrhea. The disease is usually fatal unless treated early on.

    10. Liver
    Small amounts of cooked animal liver are fine for dogs, but beware of giving too much. Since the liver can contain high amounts of Vitamin A, the organ can actually be toxic to animals. An excess of Vitamin A can cause deformed bones, anorexia and even death in some rare cases.

    Okay then. While I am a dog person myself, unlike dogs themselves, I have no quarrels with cats, but I don't feel like cutting and pasting a whole other article right now. Here is the link to a sister website on cats.

    I haven't checked if there is a similar website for fish. I'm going to guess that you shouldn't give them milkshakes or soda pop.


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    So the thing that irks me about these types of memes, is that they never cite any sources.

    Avocado is a good example of the reality being oversimplified to the point of being incorrect. Avocado is used in both cat and do food, and as noted on the ASPCA website, the fruits are NOT expected to cause harm in general, with symptoms only showing after "significant" ingestion amounts. Avocado | ASPCA

    The chicken one is placing much to much emphasis on the chicken part and should in general just be a caution to watch animals with any smoked bone.


    All of the toxic compounds ones (like garlic relatives) are a dosage makes the poison situation, with the ASPCA noting that the quantities have to be very high or concentrated


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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    So the thing that irks me about these types of memes, is that they never cite any sources.

    Avocado is a good example of the reality being oversimplified to the point of being incorrect. Avocado is used in both cat and do food, and as noted on the ASPCA website, the fruits are NOT expected to cause harm in general, with symptoms only showing after "significant" ingestion amounts. Avocado | ASPCA

    The chicken one is placing much to much emphasis on the chicken part and should in general just be a caution to watch animals with any smoked bone.


    All of the toxic compounds ones (like garlic relatives) are a dosage makes the poison situation, with the ASPCA noting that the quantities have to be very high or concentrated
    All right. I get you, but isn't a significant ingredient even in good cat food: ash? I don't have a can of cat food at hand, but I think it can be five per cent. It may have something to do with the cooking, but if the pet food producers think it's legally (if not morally) permissible to feed ashes to pets, why listen to anything they say?
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    Ash is a product of the cooking process for both dog and cat foods. It is NOT an ingredient that is added to the foods, so the assertion that the aspca site is not reliable is invalid. Add to that is AFCO that oversees and makes food guidelines not the ASPCA.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

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    flattened rat 甘肃人's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    Ash is a product of the cooking process for both dog and cat foods. It is NOT an ingredient that is added to the foods, so the assertion that the aspca site is not reliable is invalid. Add to that is AFCO that oversees and makes food guidelines not the ASPCA.
    You habitually term my remarks as invalid without understanding them. In the above quotation you are repeating what I said as if it were all your idea because you haven't understood. I have never spoken or implied anything about the ASPCA.

    My recollection, never having owned a cat (or having not lived in a place where I might read English-language cat-food labels for several years) is that 'ash' is actually listed among the ingredients on pet food cans. Why would that be so unless there was a significant amount?

    Besides all that, you have missed my original point entirely. I am saying that if pet food company's use avocado in their products, why not use ash?

    If we're going to discuss whether avocado is good for cats and dogs, and (more to the point) why they would take the trouble to procure avocado and add it in to pet food - please tell me more since you seem to know. Or we could discuss that ash is probabbly perfectly harmless in pet food. However, if you are just going to negate my every statement without reading it through, why are we even talking?
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    I notice no mention of rasins and grapes. Grape products are rather severely poisonous to dogs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    I notice no mention of rasins and grapes. Grape products are rather severely poisonous to dogs.
    Thanks. Good to know!
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    I must admit, I severly misread the topic. I thought it said something along the lines of "dog & cat are dangerous food for people."
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    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    Ash is a product of the cooking process for both dog and cat foods. It is NOT an ingredient that is added to the foods, so the assertion that the aspca site is not reliable is invalid. Add to that is AFCO that oversees and makes food guidelines not the ASPCA.
    Habitually? How many statements have I said are invalid, to date, that make it a habit?

    You habitually term my remarks as invalid without understanding them. In the above quotation you are repeating what I said as if it were all your idea because you haven't understood. I have never spoken or implied anything about the ASPCA.

    My recollection, never having owned a cat (or having not lived in a place where I might read English-language cat-food labels for several years) is that 'ash' is actually listed among the ingredients on pet food cans. Why would that be so unless there was a significant amount?

    Besides all that, you have missed my original point entirely. I am saying that if pet food company's use avocado in their products, why not use ash?

    If we're going to discuss whether avocado is good for cats and dogs, and (more to the point) why they would take the trouble to procure avocado and add it in to pet food - please tell me more since you seem to know. Or we could discuss that ash is probabbly perfectly harmless in pet food. However, if you are just going to negate my every statement without reading it through, why are we even talking?
    You are recalling incorrectly.

    The nutrition labels will include the % of ash in the food, just as they will include the amount of phosphorous. That does not make ash an ingredient that is willfully added to the food. As I have already said, it is a byproduct of the food cooking processes.

    You very clearly implied that the ASPCA is the governing body that oversees pet food nutrition, and that they allowed ash as an individual ingredient in the foods, nether is correct.

    Avocado is used in foods , (such as the brand Avoderm) for the high vitamin and oil/fatty acid content that are good for cats and dogs.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

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    Forum Radioactive Isotope cosmictraveler's Avatar
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    I use to feed my animals the IAMS foods and that way no bad stuff ever got into their digestive tracts that I was aware of. Never fed table scrapes to them.
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    @Paleoichneum - I say 'habitually' because just before I wrote that, I was reading in the Bible questions thread (in the #50s) where you were calling all my assertions invalid without really understanding what I was talking about. And you do the same here. I brought up 'ash' and said it may be a byproduct of cooking. Twice now you have explained to me (what?) that I am mistaken and that ash is a byproduct of cooking. And at the same time you tell me that my statement (that the ash is a byproduct of cooking) is invalid because it is not true...or something... I really don't know what you are talking about. Likewise this whole ASPCA thing you claim I keep going on about. You now even say that I, "clearly implied that the ASPCA is the governing body that oversees pet food nutrition." Please show me where? And if I you think I implied it, it is only you making a false inference and so 'your argument is invalid' as you are fond of saying. I know that I never mentioned the ASPCA. You brought up this organization in Post #2 and keep going on about it.

    You wrote:
    You are recalling incorrectly.

    The nutrition labels will include the % of ash in the food, just as they will include the amount of phosphorous. That does not make ash an ingredient that is willfully added to the food. As I have already said, it is a byproduct of the food cooking processes.
    Are you kidding me? I haven't seen a can of cat food that I could read the language the label is in in 20 years and you want to hang me on it's the nutrition label - not the ingredients label? I have told you I have next to no opportunity to read pet food can labels. And I got it right! There is ash in pet food and it is listed as a percentage. I thought you might tell me what that percentage is, but no, you'd rather be right than actually share topical information.

    In any case, I only meant to give some helpful information to pet owners when I started this thread. I never expected argument that would border on the vicious if its contentions were anything but wholly imaginary and/or back-assward. Get a grip, man.
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    How else is one supposed to interpret your response immediately after I cite the ASPCA. Your very next post used the possesive "they" to make assertions regarding pet food.

    In regards to those assertions, yes I will call them out as identifiably incorrect. You continue to assert that ash is a ln ingredient in pet foods. It is NOT as it is not added precooking to a food. I work as assistant manager & inventory lead at a pet supply store, I deal with foods every day and what your are claiming is not factual. It results from cooking and ONLY appears in the nutrition panel. Do you understand the difference between the two panels and what they are for?

    I cant tell you an amount as it varies with the proteins, carbohydrates, vitamin sources, cooking methods, food type (kibble, can, dehydrated, air dried, freeze dried, baked, raw) and a number of other factors.

    I take issues with your assertion of no quality based of your own lack of information and at least 20 year old memories. I posted initially to note that the subject is more complex then the website you cited makes it.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    So the thing that irks me about these types of memes, is that they never cite any sources.

    Avocado is a good example of the reality being oversimplified to the point of being incorrect. Avocado is used in both cat and do food, and as noted on the ASPCA website, the fruits are NOT expected to cause harm in general, with symptoms only showing after "significant" ingestion amounts. Avocado | ASPCA

    The chicken one is placing much to much emphasis on the chicken part and should in general just be a caution to watch animals with any smoked bone.


    All of the toxic compounds ones (like garlic relatives) are a dosage makes the poison situation, with the ASPCA noting that the quantities have to be very high or concentrated
    All right. I get you, but isn't a significant ingredient even in good cat food: ash? I don't have a can of cat food at hand, but I think it can be five per cent. It may have something to do with the cooking, but if the pet food producers think it's legally (if not morally) permissible to feed ashes to pets, why listen to anything they say?
    Read what I actually said please. I wrote: ...isn't a significant ingredient even in good cat food: ash? I am asking a question. Then I say, and this is the first time such a statement appears in this thread: It may have something to do with the cooking. Sounds like I am not sure. I was not - a question is implied. The answer turns out to be yes the ash content has to do with cooking. Then I write: if the pet food producers think it's legally (if not morally) permissible to feed ashes to pets, why listen to anything they say? Clearly 'they' refers to pet food producers.

    I have never said anything about the ASPCA and you continually insist that I have. I have never even referred to them by implication as you also insist. You are imagining all this.

    You claim to be in this business, so for you 'ingredients' has a specific meaning different from ingredients that appear in the nutrition panel. I was using the more general meaning of ingredients: the things that are in a food product. I did so because I am not in the cat food business, and had no way of knowing you were, and what special terms you use.

    Later on you write:
    I take issues with your assertion of no quality based of your own lack of information and at least 20 year old memories. I posted initially to note that the subject is more complex then [sic] the website you cited makes it.

    I asserted nothing. I asked one question, then I asked another conditional question (the one with "if" shown above). A question is an interrogative sentence. An assertion is declarative. You are imagining that I defamed your business for some reason.

    Yes, the subject may well be more complex than the website I cited makes it. If you are an expert, tell us where it goes wrong. Why come after me for imagined slights?

    And I mentioned 20 year-old memories to emphasis that yes, I don't know. I am asking!
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    甘肃人,

    Do you an English name you go by, so I know what to call you?
    Fixin' shit that ain't broke.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver1968 View Post
    甘肃人,

    Do you an English name you go by, so I know what to call you?
    The name literally means Gansu Person, but Gansu Man will do, or just Gansu. I just saw that I could put Chinese character as my username, and so I did, having just moved to Gansu, China. I'm really American, and I love Texas! Thanks for asking.
    And what does the Lord require of you but to love justice, to be merciful and to walk humbly with Him?
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    1. Garlic and Onions

    I tried feeding my dog unions, but he didn't like it, so i stopped trying to feed it to him.

    7. Corn on the Cob

    Try stopping him from eating them. We have many corn fields nearby, and we like to leave him running loose through them.

    8. Dairy Products

    Feeding him ice cream is more like a rule than an exception. At home, most people give the last bit to the dog.


    My dog doesn't like lettuce, nor spinach, but he loves cucumber, tomatoes and courgette. He also likes raw eggs, he actually takes them from bird nests he can get his paws on. Just an interesting topic..
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    I use to feed my animals the IAMS foods and that way no bad stuff ever got into their digestive tracts.
    Except for the Iams. You can find better pet food.
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    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    Read what I actually said please. I wrote: ...isn't a significant ingredient even in good cat food: ash? I am asking a question. Then I say, and this is the first time such a statement appears in this thread: It may have something to do with the cooking. Sounds like I am not sure. I was not - a question is implied. The answer turns out to be yes the ash content has to do with cooking. Then I write: if the pet food producers think it's legally (if not morally) permissible to feed ashes to pets, why listen to anything they say? Clearly 'they' refers to pet food producers.
    I understand what you wrote, do you understand that what you wrote is incorrect? There are very specific differences in the two labels on ANY food, human or pet, and something appearing on the nutrition label does not make it a material that is part of the pre-cooking formula.

    Your end conclusion of post 3 was that it was part and as such. And if it wasn't, why did you bring it up at all in response to post #2 ?

    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    You claim to be in this business, so for you 'ingredients' has a specific meaning different from ingredients that appear in the nutrition panel. I was using the more general meaning of ingredients: the things that are in a food product. I did so because I am not in the cat food business, and had no way of knowing you were, and what special terms you use.
    The meaning is no different for the seller then it is for the manufacturer or the consumer. This is the same convention that is used for human foods.

    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    Later on you write:
    I take issues with your assertion of no quality based of your own lack of information and at least 20 year old memories. I posted initially to note that the subject is more complex then [sic] the website you cited makes it.

    I asserted nothing. I asked one question, then I asked another conditional question (the one with "if" shown above). A question is an interrogative sentence. An assertion is declarative. You are imagining that I defamed your business for some reason.

    Yes, the subject may well be more complex than the website I cited makes it. If you are an expert, tell us where it goes wrong. Why come after me for imagined slights?

    And I mentioned 20 year-old memories to emphasis that yes, I don't know. I am asking!
    and i answered that you were not correct with what you remembered. I am not claiming defamation of anything, but pointing out hat you were not correct. And pointed out that the website of the initial post also was inaccurate. and i explained why it was so.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    ...In regards to those assertions, yes I will call them out as identifiably incorrect. You continue to assert that ash is [an] ingredient in pet foods. It is NOT as it is not added precooking to a food. I work as assistant manager & inventory lead at a pet supply store, I deal with foods every day and what your are claiming is not factual. It results from cooking and ONLY appears in the nutrition panel. Do you understand the difference between the two panels and what they are for? ...I cant tell you an amount as it varies with the proteins, carbohydrates, vitamin sources, cooking methods, food type (kibble, can, dehydrated, air dried, freeze dried, baked, raw) and a number of other factors.
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post
    I understand what you wrote, do you understand that what you wrote is incorrect? There are very specific differences in the two labels on ANY food, human or pet, and something appearing on the nutrition label does not make it a material that is part of the pre-cooking formula...

    ...Your end conclusion of post 3 was that it was part and as such. And if it wasn't, why did you bring it up at all in response to post #2 ?...

    ...The meaning is no different for the seller then it is for the manufacturer or the consumer. This is the same convention that is used for human foods...
    No, I don't understand the difference.

    I have taken the liberty of just quoting the pertinent parts of your statements so far that have to do with what is still not clear to me. If I have missed something significant please do tell.

    (I see you have withdrawn your ASPCA accusations. I will take that to mean you understand now that I never said anything about the ASPCA positively or negatively. You do admit that, don't you?)

    Now what I can't understand is that if the following statement is so: "It results from cooking and ONLY appears in the nutrition panel" ('it' meaning 'ash', how then can you say: "I cant tell you an amount (meaning: ash) as it varies with the proteins, carbohydrates, vitamin sources, cooking methods, food type (kibble, can, dehydrated, air dried, freeze dried, baked, raw) and a number of other factors." I read this statement as an admission that there is indeed ash in the product. In order for an amount of anything to 'vary' there must be some amount there.

    Next you write:"something appearing on the nutrition label does not make it a material that is part of the pre-cooking formula". All right - the ash was not there before cooking, but it is there now. Is this perhaps some legal nicety 'cooked-up' by corporate lawyers that makes it possible to say there is no ash - or at the very least that they need not specify that there is ash, nor its percentage among the ingredients (and by 'ingredients' I mean what actually is in the can, not the 'legal' definition)?

    Finally: "Your end conclusion of post 3 was that it was part and as such. And if it wasn't, why did you bring it up at all in response to post #2 ?..." I don't understand the bold phrase at all. What do you mean? Nevertheless, answering your question as per what I think you are asking me: I brought it up because I believe there is ash in pet food, and I was asking if this is so. Now despite your obfuscations and just (excuse me, sloppy writing style) I believe you are telling me that I am correct: not only cat and dog food, but food for human consumption contains a bit of ash (as a byproduct of its preparation). And yet somehow, you say that I am incorrect...

    It makes no difference that the ash was not there before the cooking - it is there now.

    Now before you 'take issue at my assertions' again, I will say that I understand how and why there is ash in canned (and perhaps other sorts) of food. I am all right with it. Ash is carbon and a bit of carbon is completely harmless. What is slightly burnt toast but an open-faced ash sandwich?

    What I take issue with is what I have learned from you. ("There are very specific differences in the two labels on ANY food, human or pet, and something appearing on the nutrition label does not make it a material that is part of the pre-cooking formula.") Apparently the food corporations have found a way to not list ash and its percentage in food products by mentioning them on the nutrition label instead. All right. Ash is harmless enough, but what else are they up to then? It's just a little suspicious to me that middle-level employees, such as you, have convinced themselves that there is no ash in the product when in fact there is. What you seem to be saying is self-contradictory: there is ash but there isn't - that because it is a byproduct of preparation it does not 'legally' exist. I find what I think it is you are saying rather worrying. I don't accept this separation between ingredient and nutrition labels. It sounds like the corporations are trying to prevent themselves getting sued for something. Gosh knows what.
    And what does the Lord require of you but to love justice, to be merciful and to walk humbly with Him?
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  21. #20  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Company definition of Ash
    Ash is the inorganic mineral portion of any substance. When referring to dog and cat food, "ash content" is the mineral matter, such as magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, iron, and copper. Ash is not an ingredient, but a crude simple measure, but s crude simple measure of the foods total mineral content.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pet food association of Canada
    Pet food components are broken down into the following categories: protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber and moisture. The inorganic components of pet food, such as minerals and vitamins, are called "ash" because they are not incinerated when the food is burned for its nutritional analysis.

    It was once thought that ash was responsible for Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD). However, researchers now agree this is not the case. In fact, ash contains important minerals, such as calcium and manganese, which are needed for your pet's continued good health.
    I will say now I did not give a good description of EXACTLY what ash is.

    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    No, I don't understand the difference.

    I have taken the liberty of just quoting the pertinent parts of your statements so far that have to do with what is still not clear to me. If I have missed something significant please do tell.

    Now what I can't understand is that if the following statement is so: "It results from cooking and ONLY appears in the nutrition panel" ('it' meaning 'ash', how then can you say: "I cant tell you an amount (meaning: ash) as it varies with the proteins, carbohydrates, vitamin sources, cooking methods, food type (kibble, can, dehydrated, air dried, freeze dried, baked, raw) and a number of other factors." I read this statement as an admission that there is indeed ash in the product. In order for an amount of anything to 'vary' there must be some amount there.
    As the above definitions show, there will be ash in every food that is analyzed and as I have stated there is not a set single number for all foods, it will be different with every food and even within different batches, this is why it is labeled as a min or max amount.

    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    Next you write:"something appearing on the nutrition label does not make it a material that is part of the pre-cooking formula". All right - the ash was not there before cooking, but it is there now. Is this perhaps some legal nicety 'cooked-up' by corporate lawyers that makes it possible to say there is no ash - or at the very least that they need not specify that there is ash, nor its percentage among the ingredients (and by 'ingredients' I mean what actually is in the can, not the 'legal' definition)?
    Corporate conspiracy theories are not science, this the above statement, as shown by the posted definitions, is false.

    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    Finally: "Your end conclusion of post 3 was that it was part and as such. And if it wasn't, why did you bring it up at all in response to post #2 ?..." I don't understand the bold phrase at all. What do you mean? Nevertheless, answering your question as per what I think you are asking me: I brought it up because I believe there is ash in pet food, and I was asking if this is so. Now despite your obfuscations and just (excuse me, sloppy writing style) I believe you are telling me that I am correct: not only cat and dog food, but food for human consumption contains a bit of ash (as a byproduct of its preparation). And yet somehow, you say that I am incorrect...

    It makes no difference that the ash was not there before the cooking - it is there now.
    The problem is that your belief is not based in fact, at all, as I have shown several times now.

    Quote Originally Posted by 甘肃人 View Post
    Now before you 'take issue at my assertions' again, I will say that I understand how and why there is ash in canned (and perhaps other sorts) of food. I am all right with it. Ash is carbon and a bit of carbon is completely harmless. What is slightly burnt toast but an open-faced ash sandwich?

    What I take issue with is what I have learned from you. ("There are very specific differences in the two labels on ANY food, human or pet, and something appearing on the nutrition label does not make it a material that is part of the pre-cooking formula.") Apparently the food corporations have found a way to not list ash and its percentage in food products by mentioning them on the nutrition label instead. All right. Ash is harmless enough, but what else are they up to then? It's just a little suspicious to me that middle-level employees, such as you, have convinced themselves that there is no ash in the product when in fact there is. What you seem to be saying is self-contradictory: there is ash but there isn't - that because it is a byproduct of preparation it does not 'legally' exist. I find what I think it is you are saying rather worrying. I don't accept this separation between ingredient and nutrition labels. It sounds like the corporations are trying to prevent themselves getting sued for something. Gosh knows what.
    Where specifically have i said there is NO ash in a product? again, i refer you to the definitions posted above, and state that corporate conspiracy theories are not valid arguments. Don't accept all you want, but they are distinct specific entities.
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  22. #21  
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    Gravy is bad for them too. Saying that, my dog used to love a roast dinner.
    I kept her on dried food for her whole life but she'd get treats like Chicken, Rice.
    Whenever I bought a Garlic Chicken from Asda, I'd put it in the oven for a while even though it was cooked.
    My dog would sit by the oven staring at it through the glass. I guess evolution didn't do my dog any favours in that department.

    She would eat fruit too. I used to cut up an apple for her and she loved Grapes.

    But her all time favourite was Haribo sweets.
    She would sniff them out before I could get the shopping bags through the door. She wouldn't leave us alone until we opened them and gave her one.
    Watching her chew it was classic comedy. It would get stuck to her gums.
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  23. #22  
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    Nuts.

    What type of nut is known for causing temporary paralysis in dogs?
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