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Thread: If one part of the body is warmer than the rest, would that make the other parts feel cold?

  1. #1 If one part of the body is warmer than the rest, would that make the other parts feel cold? 
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    For example if you are stood in a room that has a neutral temperature (i.e. a temperature that does not make you feel warm nor cold) and then you get into bed, sat up with only your legs under the cover, would you feel considerably colder on the top half and possibly get goosebumps (despite the upper body surrounding temperature not being too cold for thermoregulatory responses to a cold environment?) If so, is it due to the comparable difference in temperatures from your bottom half (under the covers) to the top (out in the open air)?


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    Forum Professor Zwolver's Avatar
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    Your body cannot maintain multiple temperatures. Also it cannot heat up more on one place then the other. So one part will be underheated, while another part will be overheated. Because of the variation on the surrounding temperature.


    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by schaffles View Post
    For example if you are stood in a room that has a neutral temperature (i.e. a temperature that does not make you feel warm nor cold) and then you get into bed, sat up with only your legs under the cover, would you feel considerably colder on the top half and possibly get goosebumps (despite the upper body surrounding temperature not being too cold for thermoregulatory responses to a cold environment?) If so, is it due to the comparable difference in temperatures from your bottom half (under the covers) to the top (out in the open air)?
    No, the top half of your body will not get cold if you warm the bottom half. The opposite will occur. Heat transfers from one part of the body to another by blood circulation. Your body is constantly dissipating heat to maintain a constant core body temperature. If the heat dissipation in the lower half is reduced, it will have to increase in the upper half. This occurs by processes like increased skin temperature, sweating, etc.
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    The circulatory system is whats at issue here.. ~ If you are experiencing cold limbs, as like feet or hands. Chances are you might require some medical intervention to establish a better blood flow so as to warm the extremities in a more uniform manor..
    If the environment is a comfortable temperature and you experience cold.. You have a problem with your circulatory system.
    The body can endure much and withdrawing blood flow from cold limbs is a survival method which can be fatal.. We would not like that would we.. ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by schaffles View Post
    For example if you are stood in a room that has a neutral temperature (i.e. a temperature that does not make you feel warm nor cold) and then you get into bed, sat up with only your legs under the cover, would you feel considerably colder on the top half and possibly get goosebumps (despite the upper body surrounding temperature not being too cold for thermoregulatory responses to a cold environment?) If so, is it due to the comparable difference in temperatures from your bottom half (under the covers) to the top (out in the open air)?
    Core temperature can vary with immune response, ambient temperature, and daily cycles.
    Extremity response (including trunk skin) can vary due to vasodilation or vasoconstriction.
    Sensory perception varies for many reasons including evaporative cooling and neurological response.

    Under your scenario, warming your legs sufficiently may stimulate an increase in sweating of the upper body causing it to feel cooler.

    This is somewhat complicated, what specific reason do you ask.
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    Quote Originally Posted by schaffles View Post
    For example if you are stood in a room that has a neutral temperature (i.e. a temperature that does not make you feel warm nor cold) and then you get into bed, sat up with only your legs under the cover, would you feel considerably colder on the top half and possibly get goosebumps

    You might feel colder, but that is very different from being colder. We perceive temperature in many ways, and it is often not related to the temperature of our skin.
    In general if you decrease the heat you are losing (say with a blanket) your body will warrm up as a whole. If one part is in a considerably colder environment, then your body will respond via vasoconstriction etc to try to maintain temperature.
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    A nice experiment to do at home.

    Put one hand in warm water, and the other hand in cold water.

    Then if you are accustomed to the temperatures, put both hands in the average temperature to either of them. Both hands will perceive a totally different temperature, even though it is the same. Kind of the same is happening with your heat perception when you are partially covered with a blanket.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwolver View Post
    A nice experiment to do at home.

    Put one hand in warm water, and the other hand in cold water.

    Then if you are accustomed to the temperatures, put both hands in the average temperature to either of them. Both hands will perceive a totally different temperature, even though it is the same. Kind of the same is happening with your heat perception when you are partially covered with a blanket.

    Correct up until the blanket part.

    Your body generates heat, and the blanket prevents it from leaving your body as it does not conduct heat well.

    Your blood will then move heat from this warmer part of the body.
    Newbie to Science, trying to educate myself on this forum and further my scientific knowledge.

    I like to ask a ton of questions so please be understanding!

    I like to think of new stuff and in new ways.
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    I was talking about autonomous heat perception. Your body has a constant temperature, heat is being transported all over the body. Places where heat is lost, feel cold, and places where heat is piled up, will feel warm. Because, basically they are warm and cold.

    If your blood temperature is dropping, your body will try to heat up more, or prevent blood from going into smaller blood-vessels by vasoconstriction. You will feel overall cold, even though some part of your body are not cooled down.
    Growing up, i marveled at star-trek's science, and ignored the perfect society. Now, i try to ignore their science, and marvel at the society.

    Imagine, being able to create matter out of thin air, and not coming up with using drones for boarding hostile ships. Or using drones to defend your own ship. Heck, using drones to block energy attacks, counterattack or for surveillance. Unless, of course, they are nano-machines in your blood, which is a billion times more complex..
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